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Prehistoric Fiction
Bulletin Board

newest listings first

The Shadow of the Watching Star

9/14/2014 - I am desperately seeking a hardcover edition of William Sarabande’s “The Shadow of the Watching Star”... Do you have any suggestions? There are numerous copies in paperback and I have managed to collect the series in hardcover up to this one. I have searched diligently for a while but have had no luck finding this volume in hardcover. I am finding only dead ends. Thank you for any input you might have.

Caroline Weddel

Cave > Trees > Cave

5/13/2012 - My uncle mentioned the other night that he once read a book/story about a caveman telling his son the story of how they came to be living in the cave. In essence, their people used to live in the trees as a form of protection against the savages who preyed on them from the ground. Ultimately they create weapons of defense, move onto the ground, built a society, set up government, religion, tithes, etc - Then the Gov and religion absorb so much of hte people's wealth that they can no longer support themselves... they decide to go to war against the savages. Lose. Flee to the caves. Does this ring any bells???

Michael Flynn

Linda Lay Shuler

2/6/2012 - ...Someone asked (2003!) about Linda Lay Shuler's next novel. I just read that she died a year ago at the age of 100, so I guess she's not writing any more novels. I've never read her stuff but have read Jean Auel's and Sue Harrison's works which I love. I just acquired She Who Remembers and look forward to reading the sequels.

Ellie Miller
Bethany, CT

Linda Lay Shuler 1910-2011 obituary here.


Born of the Sun

May 13, 2011 - I've just published a prehistoric novel on Amazon Kindle. You can find it here: Born of the Sun.

Many thanks!
Pete Munford

A Book Like "Dream Time"

March 24, 2011 - Thank you for your comprehensive site on on Prehistoric fiction, I've found several I want to read, even though my youth is rather long gone :)
Anyway, I'm looking for a particular book in this genre, and I couldn't find it in your list. I read it in 1973, so it obviously had to be published before then. It was written in first person, about a boy/young man who practiced cave-drawing. Although he was punished by his tribe, he wasn't ostracized. In the end he tells them to pierce the eye of a woolly mammoth, and as that is successful in killing it, he's called "Leader of the People". The book "The Dream Time" might be this, except in the description it says he's ostracized, which I don't remember.
---------------No, not Dream Time. ST
The young man of the story, and it was told in first person, is about to be initiated into manhood, along with his friends. On a dare they enter the secret initiation cave and find small carvings of animals. They get caught, as punishment they are sentenced to stay in their own cave until the rite, about 10 days. While there, he starts playing with charcoal and begins drawing, unsatisfied he watches his sisters lion cubs and gets ideas. During the initiation he realizes his drawings are better than the ones in the secret cave. Later on he becomes a scout, and then the finale is killing the woolly rhino.
I've still no idea who wrote it. I'd say it was written at young adult level.

Louisa Deboo

New Auel Novel Coming

June 14, 2010 - Just wanted to let you know that the 6th and final book in the Earth's Children Series (by Jean M. Auel) will be released March 29th 2011. The title will be: "The Land Of Painted Caves", 752 pages.

Kind regards,
Roy Knoops

Research...

February 19, 2008 - I am researching the Mesolithic period in Scotland and how the Mesolithic period has been depicted in Europe in fiction. (The Mesolithic in Scotland is considered to have been from c. 9600 BC to 4000BC, when evidence starts to appear in the archaeological record for settled farming, rather than hunter/gatherer/fisher communities). I have read the Bulletin Board with interest and wondered if any readers would be willing to tell me why you enjoy this prehistoric genre so much. Do you also read any archaeology books (non fiction)? If not, does it matter that you do not have accurate information on the period? Does accuracy matter at all? Do you assume that the author researches the period? Do you ever research the prehistoric period yourself by visiting museums? Do you think that becuase there is no documentary evidence and very little physical evidence for this period that it is more exciting because the imagination is not hampered by facts?
I hope I don't have to wait a year and a half for someone to answer, as seems to be the case with some of the other questions, but would really appreciate anyone's help.

Sheila Young

An Indian running up a hill on the cover...?

June 15, 2007 - Over 30 years ago my father showed me some of his old books from when he was a child, which were then all at my grandmother's house, and later disposed of by a relative.
One had cover art of Mohawk (I think) Indian running up a hill with a knife in his hand, sort of held firmly at his side. I spent a lot of time looking at that book cover, absolutely fascinated. I was only about 7-8 at the time and a bit too young to read the book.
It was hardcover with a dust jacket and probably published in the 1950s.
I now collect books with prehistoric or Indian themes but have never seen another copy of that book, despite many attempts and hours and hours online.
If you have any idea what the book might be would you write me?

Thanks, Jeff

Sarabande List?
January 13, 2007 - There are two lists like that on this site, a series list, and the main list. Both show that there are no books betwen "The First Americans 9" and "The First Americans 10". (I can't remember what happened to those characters...)


ST
Sarabande List?
January 12, 2007 - Would someone please put out a chronological list of the books: The First Americans Saga by William Sarabande? Is there a book between Face of the Rising Sun and Time Beyond Beginning or do the characters Ika and Warakan just disappear?

Joan Kilgen
To The Far Horizon
November 26, 2006 - Does anyone have any new information? I keep coming back to this link hoping to find out the novel has been released.

WLJ

NEW Prehistoric Fiction
November 14, 2006 - I am the author of a 6 book series titled "The Second People" I have some copies of three of the books still in my possession.
Struggling to survive in an ever-increasing hostile environment. Hemmed into smaller and smaller enclaves of habitable land they fight the elements and the beasts of the land. Some find the courage and stamina to persevere while others succumb to the rigors and hardships. Generations are born, live and die as the battle for existence continues unabated. Whole clans are annihilated when they are trapped in inescapable valleys as the long cold winter catches them unprepared. Bands starve to death when their food supplies dwindle and then even the final scraps are consumed before the hunters can venture forth seeking fresh game.
This novel illustrates in graphic detail their terror filled encounters with the beasts that inhabited those lands. It chronicles their every day fight for survival as they are forced to abandon traditional and historic ways of living and hunting that had been used by their people for perhaps three or four centuries or even more. However, even in those perilous circumstances they find time for passionate moments of sex and tender caring of their infants and elderly.
The last Ice Age found both the resident Neanderthal population of Europe and the encroaching population of Homo Sapiens (so called Cro-Magnon) engaged in a life or death struggle. This book is based on some of the latest finds and startling revelations coming from Eastern Europe and the Iberian Peninsula concerning the Neanderthals and Cro-Magnon peoples of that period.

Ed Wagner

William Sarabande
August 28, 2006 - Does anyone know why "To The Far Horizon" has not been published? Perhaps the author is ill. Does anyone know how to get in touch with the publisher?


Toni
Any new prehistory books coming out soon?
August 26, 2006 - Does anyone know of any new prehistory fiction books coming down the pipes? I don’t know what happened to William Sarabande’s new novel but, in the meantime, is there a specific web site (other than this one) that is devoted to prehistory books? I’ve read everything I can get my hands on and I’d like to find some new prehistory authors or, better yet, new books by some existing favorite authors of prehistory.
Thanks!,
Linda
William Sarabande's "To the Far Horizon"
April 8, 2006 - I was anxiously awaiting the March 2005 release of this book only to learn that the publisher pulled the release, with no future release date scheduled. Have tried to find out from the publisher when this final book of the series will be released with no results. Does anyone know anything?? Apparently, this book was originally scheduled for release in 1996!! Maybe the author herself will be kind enough to provide some info. I find it very frustrating to have read the entire series (which I loved!), only to be unable to obtain this final book.
Nikita

Where's the new Sarabande?
March 1, 2006 - I have searched the web for HOURSSSSSSSSSS trying to get my hands on "To The Far Horizon" by William Sarabande - have you got any idea if the book was ever published and what in the world happened to the author?
Margaret Allans wanted
I have also been trying to get the collection by Margaret Allan, ie Keeper of the Stone, the Mammoth Stone, Last Mammoth, Spirits Walking Woman, Sister of the Sky - I just want them in good condition paper backs.

Thanx,
Linda Geist
New book on prehistoric films
March 1, 2006 - If you like films and prehistory, this is where they've all been collected and described. Michael Klossner's new book from McFarland, Prehistoric Humans in Film and Television. It's a great reference, with long articles on, for example, Quest for Fire, Clan of the Cave Bear, The Flintstones, One Million Years B.C., Ice Age, Brother Bear... illustrated with b/w stills. It describes the movies in detail, and is fun to read.

William Sarabande's "To the Far Horizon" not coming out?!
March 10, 2005 - I have heard through the grapevine that William Sarabande's new book To the Far Horizon is not going to printed at all. Does anyone know what happened?!!!!!!

Dawn Wilson
William Sarabande
January 6, 2005 - Does anyone know when William Sarabande's new prehistoric nove "To The Far Horizon" will be out? Magnificent writer.
Jackie Ulch
William Sarabande
January 1, 2005 - Hi! I just put 'prehistoric fiction books' in my search engine and came up with your excellent site as the first hit. I'll definitely put it on my favorites list, to read at leisure. There's a lot there!
I liked Jean Auel's book, but felt 'Clan of the Cave Bear' was her best and the subsequent books went TOO deeply into detail. Got a bit boring in places.
I prefer Sarabande's First American series. Is he/she still writing? I've read all that's out, I believe, and thirst for more. I love her realistic creation of a prehistoric society, including mores, religion, food, clothing. It's like reading archaeology instead of fiction, she seems so knowledgeable about this prehistoric culture she creates. I also love the fact that the characters span a couple of books in the series. People that are children in one book have matured to young adults in the next and are finally the aged ones in the next. She's just totally unique in her style and I recommend her to anyone who loves this genre.
Thanks for a great website!
Sue Ellen

Anyone know what this new book will be about? Do you think "To the Far Horizon" will have the same characters as Spirit Moon?. I can't remember, were there any still alive? ;-)
If Joan Hamilton Cline, aka William Sarabande is reading this, can you explain why you've changed the storyline throughout books 1-11. I felt like I "knew" Torka, and then he was gone. :-( I'm not being critical, just wondering. Some of the books had abrupt beginnings, because I didn't know I was beginning a new storyline. Thanks so much for the GREAT books. They are my favorite series.

Rachel Brusseau
To the Far Horizon - William Sarabande
December 29, 2004 - I'm so excited about the new book by William Sarabande. It's supposed to be released in March of 2005. Only three months away!!! Here's the info:

To the Far Horizon
William Sarabande
Mass Market Paperback 656 pages (March 1, 2005)
Publisher: Bantam Books
ISBN: 0553579126 Book about a cave girl...
May 12, 2004 - I am looking for a book about a cave girl I read in 1970. A cave girl is found dead, in pristine condition, and her life story unfolds. Great Nature Book. Wonderful writing of her life. It was an old book in 1970, Hardcover, no pictures. At the end of the book she decomposes after her story is revealed. No it is not morbid!! Great nature book!! Please help if you can. I can't remember the name of the book or the writers name. Thanks!!

Patti
William Sarabande
Jan. 18, 2004 - Been reading Sarabande for years and was quiet tickled to find out he was a she. Ha! I have complete sets of most of these prehistoric series. You might say this is my thing. I read quiet a lot of science fiction. Is there a similar site for those? Sorry to those who are hunting for copies. I'm not selling, but if you will check sites like Amazon, eBay and Alibris, you probably can find them.
Regards
nicksroxie
William Sarabande
November 23, 2003 - I'm from South Africa and am so glad that I discovered this site! I've read all the Jean M Auel books and also several of Sue Harrison and Michael and Kathleen Gear's books. I recently discovered William Sarabande's works and must say that I find them fascinating. So far I've managed to source all the titles locally, except for "Face of the Rising Sun". I know that this can be purchased from Amazon, etc. but due to the R/USD exchange rate and the cost of shipping, this is not possible for me. I was hoping that there may be some South Africans who read your bulletin board that may be of assistance to me. I am prepared to pay for a secondhand copy as well as all postage/shipping ex-South Africa. If there is a South African out there who has a copy but doesn't want to sell it, I would appreciate it if I could borrow it and then return it once I've read it (I cherish and respect books and will not damage it), in this case I will also pay all postage/shipping, etc.
Regards
MJ Pillemer
Linda Lay Shuler's 4th book?
August 21, 2003 - I know I posted this earlier, but it was nearly 4 years ago, so I thought I would try again.
Does anyone know when Linda Lay Shuler is going to write the fourth book to the Time Circle quartet? I have read her other three books and eagerly await the fourth. On the Amazon book description of the Let the Drum Speak, it said that this book was the third in the Time Circle quartet, which I assume there should be more coming? Does anyone know how to get a hold of her or if she has a personal web site!?! Any information, rumors or not, would be appreciated. Thanks!.
Kevin
Sarabande update / wanawut
May 26, 2003 - Interesting site! Here's a Sarabande update and a brief reply to the person who requested information on the wanawut in William Sarabande's novels, CORRIDOR OF STORMS and FORBIDDEN LAND:
The character was not a purely fanciful conjuring. It was inspired by a pictograph incised into a reindeer antler baton found in a Magdellenian Cave in Ice Age France.
TO THE FAR HORIZON, the twelth novel in The First Americans series, will be published early next year.
Best,
Joan Hamilton Cline
aka William Sarabande
Lawson Wood
November 22, 2002 - I notice Steve lists a book by Alice Raiker, The Tootle Bird & The Brontos, illustrated by Lawson Wood. (Buffalo, NY 1907). I am researching the artist Lawson Wood, who was particularly well known for for his imaginary prehistoric illustrations. Does any one know where I can find a copy of this book? More examples of his work can be found at www.lawson-wood-prints.com.
Carole Webb

September 27, 2001 - Do you know this book?
Stephen's question from April 1, 2000, above, finally answered, a year and a half later!

This/those books was generally the lifestory of a Paleolithic Thomas Edison - he spent his life inventing things left and right: the bow and arrow, pottery, writing, and the like. It was illustrated with expressive illustrations, some of which I describe below.
The cover (which I just conjured up for the first time in years, as I type this!), if I recall it correctly, was of a boy with a bow and arrow, kneeling atop a boulder or something like that, facing an upright and snarling cave bear; and the title seems to be something like 'The First [something]....' but I wouldn't swear to it. Now, the passages that I recall:
1) As a boy, he invented the bow and arrow - from observing, I think, how a springy sapling sent flying an object pressed against it - and after some initial successes, he showed it to his grandfather, who urged him to demonstrate its worth to the tribe. A flock of migrating geese flew over their encampment - as I recall, they all lived on a cliffside full of caves, and were not nomadic - and the grandfather urged him to shoot one down. I recall some dialog: "I missed!" he cried out. "Try again!" the grandfather urged - and he succeeds in bringing one down. There's an illustration of the grandfather, a skinny and bald bearded guy, holding the goose up and proudly showing it to a wide eyed and gaping caveman.

This is Chester G. Osborne's "The First Boy and Arrow" (1951). Actually, the first time (p.71) Chicka downed the goose. It was the second time, (p. 78) when with his grandfather he tried for a flock of ducks:
Chicka held up the bow, then slid down onto one knee to keep his balance. The string twanged. "I missed!" Chicka cried.
"Try again!" said Ol.
Chicka grabbed another arrow and shot.
"I hit one he yelled. "Look! I hit one!"

2) At the end of this book, the boy, now all grown up and 'married' to a woman, has just gotten a son; there's an illustration of him holding the son up to a rising sun, and the text says something about the promise of the future, etc.

This is different book, Wilbur W. Fiske's "Bo the Cave Boy" (1941) where the final illustration looks like this (right), and the final paragraph is reproduced below:
"O Sun! Be very kind to Bo. Watch over him when I am not near, and be not angry with him. Send your light to show him the way, and let Moon light him by night. Keep him well and strong. Make him a mighty hunter. Guard him against all dangers so that he may worship thee and praise thee, even as will the children of his children."
Then we stood and watched Sun as he climbed higher in the sky, and all about us was the brightness of a new day.

3) Possibly in this book (but I recall no illustration accompanying it), there is a description of a crude calendar; when someone is born, a peg is driven in the ground where the noon shadow of a pole falls, and when the shadow returns to that peg (only once a year, obviously), that was considered the special day of the person whose peg it was, and gifts were given to him... this existed before the birth of the hero, and was not invented by him.

This is also "Bo the Cave Boy." (Chapter 2) "We Watch Our Shadow Pole" (p.16)
"When a son was born in one of the caves, his father would wait that day until Sun had climbed to his highest point in the sky. Then he would drive a stake at the point where the shadow of the pole ended... Every boy would watch the shadow of the family pole, and the day the shadow stopped at his stake was his Day."
4) This passage has haunted me all my life, and I would love to see it again, to confirm my speculations. The hero is hunting on his own, and peering through some bushes, he sees a creature eating leaves from a tree with its tongue. [There might have been an illustration of that] When he camps out that night by a riverside, he takes the clay from the bank and plays with it, making a model of the creature he had seen. Then he drives his fist into it, making a cup, and throws it in the fire before going to sleep. Later on, he retrieves the object and notices it had hardened, and notices further it is capable of holding water... and the idea of pottery is born.
What haunts me about this passage is this: in the part describing the creature, there was a footnote identifying it for the modern reader. I remember not making any sense out of what it said, but from the description, I identified it as an iguanodon (the herbivorous dinosaur, usually depicted as eating leaves with its tongue), and I was incredulous at this juxtaposition of a dinosaur with a caveman, but let it pass for the sake of remaining engrossed in the story.
Looking back at this now, I'm betting that the creature was actually a ground sloth, and that the footnote said 'Megalotherium', which I did not recognize since I wasn't interested in Ice Age mammals then; I probably identified it (and the illustration?) with the closest animal I could think of, the iguanodon, and fastened to that identification like a leech. I would dearly love to see that passage again to confirm this.
And this is also "Bo the Cave Boy." No illustration for it, and he's actually with his friend Ner. The footnote said it was an Iguanadon! Here's the complete section, p. 125-128.
ST

July 9, 2001 - Gear Website
We have just finished the first cut ot the Gear web site. The address is www.gear-gear.com.

Barbara Lock

May 30, 2001 - IE Movies
There r a couple of the Earth's Children books by Jean Auel that were made into movies: 'Clan Of the Cave Bear,' and 'Valley of the Horses.' 'Clan of the Cave Bear' has been on cable TV several times, but 'Valley of the Horses' is harder to find.

mansquaw

May 19, 2001 - New book by Lynn Armistead McKee

There is a new book coming out by Lynn Armistead McKee (June 2001) called Daughter of the Fifth Moon. Her earlier books include Woman of the Mists (1991), Touches the Stars (1992), Keeper of Dreams (1993), Walks in Stardust (1994), and Spirit of the Turtle Woman (1999).

"My books take place about 2500 years ago in Florida (pre-European contact) so even though not ice age, they are prehistoric fiction. All the tribes I write about are extinct."

January 26, 2001 - Dinosaur Wars - I'd like to introduce my science fiction novel Dinosaur Wars. Though not about human ancestors, the book has detailed descriptions of what a "humanoid" dinosaur might have looked and acted like.
The novel combines action, adventure and romance with descriptions of dinosaurs such as T-rex, pachyrhinosaurus, parasaurolophus and megaraptor (complete with eagle-like feathers). It is scientifically more up-to-date then Jurassic Park, and has some good, wholesome human heroes as well.
To get to Amazon's page for my book, just click Amazon for "Dinosaur Wars." Their page has several reviews posted on it. To see my own web site and learn more about my book, click the dustjacket image to go to the link below. You can read some sample chapters and get a feel for the book. You probably already own Jurassic Park etc., but don't know about Dinosaur Wars yet.

Thomas P. Hopp
Author of DINOSAUR WARS,
a science fiction novel published by iUniverse
Now Humans are the Endangered Species!
members.aol.com/dinosaurwars

December 15, 2000 - Linda Lay Shuler: The 4th Book?
Does anyone know when Linda Lay Shuler is going to write the fourth book to the Time Circle quartet? I have read her other three books and eagerly await the fourth. On the Amazon book description of the Let the Drum Speak, it said that this book was the third in the Time Circle quartet, which I assume there should be more coming? Does anyone know how to get a hold of her or if she has a personal web site!?! Any information, rumors or not, would be appreciated. Thanks!.

Kevin Feeman
Lead Technical Writer
MicroMass Communications Inc.
www.micromass.com
(919) 851-3182 Ext. 3105
kevin.feeman@micromass.com

November 5, 2000 - Prehistoric Films?
I'm looking for a listing of serious movies on the topic of prehistoric peoples. Films along the lines of "Quest for Fire". Not "One Million B.C.", not cartoons, not "Exodus".
Any suggestions on where on the Net I might look?

Wes Nelson

July 1, 2000 - Megan Lindholm's "Saga of the Reindeer People"
I've just read Megan Linholm's "Saga of the Reindeer People" which includes "The Reindeer People" and "Wolf's Brother". (A note at the end explains that they were originally written as a single book, then separated to facilitate paperback publishing.) Though not exactly stone age (there's a touch of bronze) it's a great tale of prehistoric Lapps. If you can find a copy of this combined edition I'll bet you'll like it!


ST

June 22, 2000 - William Sarabande's wanawut
I am so happy to have found this site. I was wondering about the creature so vividly described in Sarabande's books called the wanawut. Is this purely a fictitious character, is it found in mythology? Any information would be greatly appreciated.

Thank you,
Kim Moore

June 19, 2000 - Missing Link
I only saw the ending but was able to guess some things about it, such as it was the same as The Inheritors. Trying to get the title of this film was a struggle. Including an email to Chris Stringer. Well it was called Missing Link. Perhaps you have overlooked it as well as me. I think I'll rent this one if I see it again. washingtonpost.com : 'Missing Link' (PG)

Thor

June 3, 2000 - Sue Harrison's New Release Delayed by Publisher
The last book in the 'Storyteller Trilogy,' "Call Down The Stars" which was supposed to be printed and released this Spring of 2000 by Avon Books. HarperCollins Publishing purchased Avon. The book now is not to be released until Fall 2001.
This is a slap in the face to all readers of Sue Harrison's works. Please write HarperCollins ASAP if you would like to see this date changed. I did.

Brent McCoy

 

May 28, 2000 - Chronology
Thrilled and delighted to discover this site. Anyone else think it would be nice to add another 'chronology' to the years of publication? Maybe there already is one? I speak of a chronology with the titles arranged according to the period(s) covered by that particular volume. Just a thought.

Cheers,
Noah

May 17, 2000 - New Sarabande Title

There is a new Joan Hamilton Cline (aka William Sarabande) book coming out called Spirit Moon. Amazon.com website says estimated publication date is August 1, 2000.

Kevin Feeman

 

April 19, 2000 - Ms William Sarabande!

I was reading William Sarabande's latest, "Time Beyond Beginning," when I happened to turn to the back page and found this photo and news:

Joan Hamilton Cline is the real name of William Sarabande, author of the internationally bestselling First Americans series. She was born in Hollywood, California, and started writing when she was seventeen years old. First published in 1979, Joan has been writing as William Sarabande for eleven years. She lives with her husband in Fawnskin, California. This is the first novel to be published in the United States that reveals her true identity.

Till now I'd thought Sarabande was about the only male writer of "serial" prehistorics besides Margaret Allan (W.T. "Bill" Quick).

ST

April 13, 2000 - John Taine?
A few years back I received a suggestion that some of John Taine's books might be appropriate for the list. I found a couple of likely-sounding titles -- "Before the Dawn," "The Time Stream," "Seeds of Life" -- but I don't know anything about them. Anyone?

ST

April 13, 2000 - Asimov's Science Fiction Masterpieces
I just saw a description of the book, "Asimov's Science Fiction Masterpieces" - Galahad Books - 1986 - 59 stories... "From man as primitive cave dweller to pioneer space explorer to regenerating immortal..." Does anyone know what the "man as primitive cave dweller" story in that book is?

ST

April 13, 2000 - "Prehistoric People" Fiction?
Thanks Bob! But (for now at least) I'm limiting myself to only listing "Prehistoric People" fiction -- stories including "Early Man" It sounds like Simak's time travelers (and the others on your list) don't run across any pre-humans...

ST

April 13, 2000 - Some More Books for Your List
"Mastodonia" by Clifford D.Simak. Set in his beloved rural Wisconsin this time travel novel sends its protagonists dinosaur hunting in the Mesozoic and living in the Pleistocene. The novel was published as "Catface" in the U.K. Simak also did a prehistoric short story called "Small Deer" which is in several anthologies.
[BTW, I remember another time travel story entitled "Mastodonia" that was broadcast in the early Sixties on the radio Sci-Fi series "X minus 1". It was a different story.]
"Wildside" by Stephen Gould. Five Texas teenagers use a tunnel that leads to a parallel Earth where there are no humans. Ice Age mammals still rule the pristine landscape and create problems when (using money from the sale of "extinct" passenger pigeons to zoos as venture capital) they try to mine millions of dollars of untouched gold at the site of the Cripple Creek, Colorado gold rush mining camp. Then a rogue CIA agent tries to take over their discovery.

BTW, I greatly enjoyed your site.
Bob Mozark

April 8, 2000 - Another book for the list
Hello again! Here's a new book to add to your list: "Nublares" by Antonio Pérez Henares. This book is a Prehistoric novel and I think is published only in Spanish.

Adiós!
Francesc

April 7, 2000 - A book for the list
Hello, I'm Spanish and I love this kind of novel (prehistoric), sorry my English is very bad! Well, I want to add to your blibliography two new books:
- "Sous le vent du monde" by PIERRE PELOT (1996)
- "Le chamane du Bout-du-Monde" by JEAN COURTIN (1998)
These two books are from France, but published in Spain too. Bueno, espero que les sea de ayuda mi aportación.

Adiós y adelante con la página!
Francesc

April 2, 2000 - Maybe the Og books...
Thanks, I'll look for them and let you know... sounds very possible.

Stephen

April 2, 2000 - Crump's "Og" books?
Sounds like it might be Irving Crump's "Og" books. Have you checked those? I've found a description of "Og of the Cave People", with a significant comment: "... Missing link genius Og continues his invention spree..." The cover is supposed to be Og about to spear a sabertooth.
There were 4 in the series: Og - Son of Fire (1922), Og, Boy of Battle (1925), Og of the Cave People (1935), Og, Son of Og (1965).

ST

April 1, 2000 - Do you know this book?
I wonder if I can give you a query about a prehistoric fiction book I read as a child? I recall passages from it vividly and I would dearly love to reread it, but I have absolutely no memory of its title or its author.
There are three or four passages that I remember - and now that I examine my memory, I wonder if I might not be confusing two separate novels, because the appearance and layout of the pages in my memory seem to differ?
Obviously I should mention when I read this/those book/s? Hmm, the early 60s: 1962 to 1964 is the narrowest I can make it.
This/those books was generally the lifestory of a Paleolithic Thomas Edison - he spent his life inventing things left and right: the bow and arrow, pottery, writing, and the like. It was illustrated with expressive illustrations, some of which I describe below.
The cover (which I just conjured up for the first time in years, as I type this!), if I recall it correctly, was of a boy with a bow and arrow, kneeling atop a boulder or something like that, facing an upright and snarling cave bear; and the title seems to be something like 'The First [something]....' but I wouldn't swear to it. Now, the passages that I recall:
1) As a boy, he invented the bow and arrow - from observing, I think, how a springy sapling sent flying an object pressed against it - and after some initial successes, he showed it to his grandfather, who urged him to demonstrate its worth to the tribe. A flock of migrating geese flew over their encampment - as I recall, they all lived on a cliffside full of caves, and were not nomadic - and the grandfather urged him to shoot one down. I recall some dialog: "I missed!" he cried out. "Try again!" the grandfather urged - and he succeeds in bringing one down. There's an illustration of the grandfather, a skinny and bald bearded guy, holding the goose up and proudly showing it to a wide eyed and gaping caveman.
2) At the end of this book, the boy, now all grown up and 'married' to a woman, has just gotten a son; there's an illustration of him holding the son up to a rising sun, and the text says something about the promise of the future, etc.
3) Possibly in this book (but I recall no illustration accompanying it), there is a description of a crude calendar; when someone is born, a peg is driven in the ground where the noon shadow of a pole falls, and when the shadow returns to that peg (only once a year, obviously), that was considered the special day of the person whose peg it was, and gifts were given to him... this existed before the birth of the hero, and was not invented by him.
4) This passage has haunted me all my life, and I would love to see it again, to confirm my speculations. The hero is hunting on his own, and peering through some bushes, he sees a creature eating leaves from a tree with its tongue. [There might have been an illustration of that] When he camps out that night by a riverside, he takes the clay from the bank and plays with it, making a model of the creature he had seen. Then he drives his fist into it, making a cup, and throws it in the fire before going to sleep. Later on, he retrieves the object and notices it had hardened, and notices further it is capable of holding water... and the idea of pottery is born.
What haunts me about this passage is this: in the part describing the creature, there was a footnote identifying it for the modern reader. I remember not making any sense out of what it said, but from the description, I identified it as an iguanodon (the herbivorous dinosaur, usually depicted as eating leaves with its tongue), and I was incredulous at this juxtaposition of a dinosaur with a caveman, but let it pass for the sake of remaining engrossed in the story.
Looking back at this now, I'm betting that the creature was actually a ground sloth, and that the footnote said 'Megalotherium', which I did not recognize since I wasn't interested in Ice Age mammals then; I probably identified it (and the illustration?) with the closest animal I could think of, the iguanodon, and fastened to that identification like a leech. I would dearly love to see that passage again to confirm this. Well, here you are. Hope you will be able to provide me with a few answers.

Stephen

March 4, 2000 - Kel of the Ancient River
Ain't the WWW awesome!

Jim

March 4, 2000 - Kel of the Ancient River
How about: Hans Horler's "Kel Of The Ancient River"? [Frederick Warne & Co., [1957], First American Edition, 1963, yellow cloth boards with DJ, translated from German by Moyra McGavin, Illustrated by Kurt Roschl.]

ST

March 2, 2000 - Kel, a caveboy
Your prehistoric fiction site is a wonderful find! I was wondering if you have heard of a children's novel that dealt with a cave-boy. I remember it being called 'The River with one Bank' but now I have a feeling that that may have been a phrase in the book and the title may have been something else.
The cave-boy was called Kel and early on in the book he is given a tooth on a sinew to wear around his neck. The book deals with his journey to get obsidian. The river with one bank is the sea.
My memory has it that the book was translated from German into English. I read it in the early 60s as a library book. In 1963 I was eight, so you can tell that it has made a lasting impression on me.

Jim

March 1, 2000 - Colleen's Grandfather's Book (2 years later)
How about Stanley Waterloo's (1914.) "A Son of the Ages, the reincarnations and adventures of Scar, the link; a story of man from the beginning"? I haven't seen it, but from the descriptions I've read, it sounds like it might be the one.

ST

Tue, 15 Dec 1998 - The Cave Man by Corbin
My hobby is researching Robert E. Howard, the author of "Spear and Fang," listed on your bibliography. Recently I've been trying to root out some of the sources of his early work, including that one. A friend pointed me to your web page, and the bibliography is most interesting.
I took a printout of the titles through 1925 (the year that "Spear and Fang" was published) to the Library of Congress with me yesterday, in order to check out some of the titles. I found one, in particular, that definitely does not belong: John Corbin's THE CAVE MAN is a "modern" novel (at least it was in 1909). The "cave man" bit is explained in the first chapter, when the main character is explaining to a young lady that his machine shop and garage businesses take up all his time and he even eats in the shop, and she says he is like a cave man. There's a bit more badinage in which the term is repeated, to reinforce for us that this character is the "cave man" of the title. I quickly thumbed through the rest of the book to be sure, and it's just a basic romance novel of the period.
... A major source of prehistoric fiction that is overlooked in the bibliography is the pulp magazines. For instance, Paul Anderson did a series of novelettes in Argosy in 1920 or so about a tribe of Cro-Magnons. This series appears to have been at least a minor influence on Robert E. Howard's early work. I've run into some other prehistoric fiction as I've researched the old pulps. I'll try to put together a listing for you one of these days.
Hope some of the above is helpful. Particularly wanted to let you know the Corbin book should be deleted, so no poor prehistory fan ends up looking for it. And it provides me the opportunity to say thanks for creating the website, which is pretty darn cool.

Rusty

Sun, 29 Mar 1998 - Cave Man
You have "Cave Man" by John Corbin, 1909, D. Appleton & Co. listed. Do you know anything about this book? I'm trying to track down a book of my grandfather's that I read as a child - it was fiction, written from the perspective of a cave man in his day-to-day experiences. As he encounters threats, mishaps, etc., he loses consciousness or dies and wakes up in an evolved state, only to encounter another experience and so on.
As I read this book close to 30 years ago, I can't remember the author or title but "Cave Man" sounds like it could be the right title.
I would appreciate any help you could give me in determining whether Corbin's book is the right one, and if so, how I would go about finding a copy of it. It had quite an impact me as a child and I would love to read it again in memory of my grandfather.

Many thanks,
Colleen


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(ST = Steve Trussel)

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