Bibliography  Reference  Forum  Plots  Texts  Simenon  Gallery  Shopping  Film  Links

English   French  

Maigret of the Month: Maigret et le tueur (Maigret and the Killer)
11/25/09 –

1. Mini-analysis of the novel

This novel is split into two large parts. In the first, the author paints a sort of picture of the life of the districts of Paris. It's as if Simenon wants to offer us a condensation of the various milieus of the capital... thus the author leads us successively into the district where the Maigrets live, that of "little people", craftsmen and shopkeepers, then into the well-to-do Ile Saint-Louis (where the Batilles live), then, with the aid of the recordings made by young Antoine, into the cafés of the Bastille district, whose habitués are underworld types. It's a chance for the author to describe to us the ambiance of the cafés where Maigret feels comfortable, in contrast with the muffled atmosphere of Tout-Paris – the Paris smart set, represented by the Batilles. And without missing a chance to show us the closeness of the Maigret couple.

Up until the middle of the novel, we witness a parade of images, like "flashes", as if Simenon were enjoying recalling for us all the different milieus in which Maigret had led his investigations.

And then, after an episode almost out of Rocambole, the arrest of the gang of thieves, as if the author were showing us that if he wanted to, he could also write us an "American-style action novel", with suspense and exciting arrests, suddenly the tone changes in Ch. 5, which begins the second part of the novel. The playing is over. Maigret attends Antoine's funeral, and we are brought back to reality – someone has been killed in this story, and the killer has to be found.

The author presents us with a few more of the victim's traits, by way of questioning his schoolmates and his girlfriend, and then, while we might imagine that Maigret will focus, as he often does, on the life of the victim, the projector changes its target once more... it's the murderer who will take front stage. And thus begins the second part of the novel, where the author will ask, once again, one of his fundamental and permanent questions, that of human responsibility, in particular when one has committed murder.

After the killer sends a letter to a newspaper, he regularly phones Maigret, and the Chief Inspector himself will constantly try to understand the personality of his caller and gain his trust, to have him give himself up. So we observe a "demonstration" of Maigret's faculty of empathy, as summed up in this sentence Simenon attributes to Mme Maigret, certainly the person who understands best, "from the inside" the reactions of the Chief Inspector. "She knew hardly more than the newspapers, but what the newspapers didn't realize, was how much energy he put into trying to understand, the kind of concentration he brought into play during the course of certain investigations. You could say that he identified with those he tracked, and that he suffered the same torments they did."

The tragic confession of the killer leaves us with a bitter taste. He relieves himself of his anguish, putting his fate in Maigret's hand, but his situation will be no better than before... the care he needs will not be given, and he will be condemned to an "ordinary" detention, with no true hope for recovery. How better could the author have expressed his feeling of the uselessness of the justice of men faced with the question, with no answer, or responsibility...

2. To the movies, for a change of ideas

At the end of Ch. 4, Maigret phones his wife to tell her he'll be home for dinner, and he suggests going to the movies, "for a change of ideas".

If Maigret likes going to the movies, it's not so much for the film itself – he's simple enough in his taste on that point – he likes westerns, and comedies from the 20s and 30s, Chaplin, and Laurel and Hardy (NEW). In fact, what he likes about the movies, is going there accompanied by his wife.

From the beginning of the corpus, there have been few allusions to the cinema. It was while following Pietr le Letton (LET) that he entered a movie theater, where a "puerile film" was showing. Maigret hardly watched the screen, satisfied to mull over his investigation. It's somewhat the same "technique" that he uses in the memorable scene in CEC, where we see "Maigret, his two hands in his pockets, pipe in his teeth, strolling down Boulevard Montparnasse, looking grouchy. He stops in front of a movie theater". He asks for a seat in the balcony, settles himself in, encased in his overcoat, and "in that state of physical numbness, his thoughts, like in dreams, sometimes going to the absurd, followed paths that pure reason wouldn't have discovered... And that's how he thinks without thinking, in snatches, by pieces of ideas which he doesn't try to put end to end."

But aside from this "professional" use of the cinema, it's above all for the pleasure of sharing a good moment with Mme Maigret that the Chief Inspector goes to the movies. And it's especially in the Presses de la Cité period, where Mme Maigret takes on greater importance, that we see the couple going off, arm in arm, to a local movie house, for example on Boulevard Bonne Nouvelle (BAN, CLI), or Boulevard des Italiens (MME), or, more rarely, to one of the big theaters on the Champs-Elysées (AMU).

3. Maigret's leisure time

The novel, two-thirds of the way through, is interrupted by the Sunday visit of the Maigrets to their house at Meung. It's as if Maigret – and behind him his author – needed a pause to regain his momentum before facing the final part of the investigation and the last interrogation of the killer.

What does Maigret do when he goes to Meung, or when he arrives there, rather rarely, to take a break during an investigation and to get out of the capital? In a word, what does he do during his rare free time?

What we can say first off, is that his activities are, for one thing, little varied, and for another, they're already the same as what he'll do in retirement.

For one, Maigret tends a garden, as a way, perhaps, to find again a little of the taste of a country childhood, and to renew contact with the earth. What does he grow in his little enclosed garden? Lettuce and tomatoes (not), melons (not, NEW), peas, endive and eggplant (FAC).

His other important activity is fishing: trout streams in Alsace (GUI), pike in the Loire (MAI), perch again in the Loire (ceu) roach in the Seine (COL). Maigret fishes with a rod and reel, and is even good at it, according to what the people say in Meung (TUE).

The third leisure activity to which the Chief Inspector is devoted is games, essentially, card playing. It sometimes happens, fairly rarely, that he'll play billiards (JUG, AMU), but it's really cards which are his preference. If his plays manille (ceu), Pope Joan (OMB), or bridge (GUI), even if he sometimes denies being able to play the latter, giving him an excellent pretext for watching the others play, their behavior at play revealing much about their character (VAC, PEU), his preference is for belote (JUG, NEW, ASS, TUE, BRA).

This stay at Meung is a little break, at the same time a foreshadowing of what's waiting for Maigret in retirement... when he will no longer have to deal with murders, when he will no longer need to plunge himself into the depths of the human soul, he can spend his time playing cards and caring for his garden, while a stew is simmering, wafting a perfume that mixes with the scent of the polish of well-waxed rooms. Yes, it will be a rest... but will the Chief Inspector be truly happy there, to the extent of having no longing for the ambiance of the cafés and streets of Paris ....

Murielle Wenger

translation: S. Trussel
Honolulu, November 2009

original French

Maigret of the Month: Maigret et le tueur (Maigret and the Killer)
11/25/09 –
Maigret of the month

Maigret et le tueur

1. Mini-analyse du roman

Ce roman s'articule en deux grandes parties: une première, où l'auteur brosse en quelque sorte un tableau de la vie des quartiers de Paris. C'est comme si Simenon voulait nous offrir un condensé des milieux divers de la capitale: c'est ainsi que l'auteur nous promène successivement dans le quartier du domicile des Maigret, peuplés des petites gens, artisans et boutiquiers, puis dans le quartier cossu de l'île Saint-Louis (au domicile des Batille), puis, par le truchement des enregistrements fait par le jeune Antoine, dans les cafés du quartier de la Bastille, dont les habitués sont des "gars du milieu". C'est l'occasion pour l'auteur de nous décrire l'ambiance de ces cafés où Maigret se sent à l'aise, par contraste avec le milieu feutré du Tout-Paris représenté par les Batille. Sans manquer aussi de nous montrer un peu de l'intimité du couple des Maigret.

Jusqu'au milieu du roman, on assiste ainsi à un défilé d'images, comme des "flashes", comme si Simenon s'amusait à nous rappeler tous les milieux dans lesquels il arrive à Maigret de mener ses enquêtes.

Et puis, après l'épisode quasi rocambolesque de l'arrestation de la bande des cambrioleurs, comme si l'auteur forçait encore le trait en nous montrant que, s'il le voulait, il saurait même nous écrire un roman "d'action à l'américaine", avec suspense et arrestation mouvementée, soudain le ton change au chapitre 5, qui inaugure la deuxième partie du roman: fini le rocambolesque, Maigret se rend à l'enterrement d'Antoine: nous sommes rappelés à la réalité: il y a un mort dans cette histoire, et il s'agit de découvrir le coupable.

L'auteur nous présente encore quelques traits de la victime, par l'intermédiaire des interrogatoires de ses camarades d'études, et de sa petite amie, puis, alors qu'on pourrait s'imaginer que Maigret va se focaliser, comme il lui arrive de le faire, sur la vie de la victime, le projecteur change de nouveau de cible: c'est le meurtrier qui va occuper le devant de la scène. Et c'est alors que débute la deuxième partie du roman, où l'auteur va poser, une fois de plus, une de ses interrogations fondamentale et permanente: celui de la responsabilité de l'être humain, en particulier lorsqu'il a commis un meurtre.

Après la lettre envoyée au journal par le meurtrier, celui-ci n'aura de cesse d'appeler Maigret au téléphone, et le commissaire, lui, n'aura de cesse de tenter de cerner la personnalité de son interlocuteur et de le mettre en confiance, afin qu'il se livre de lui-même. On assiste alors à une "démonstration" de la faculté d'empathie de Maigret, résumée par cette phrase que Simenon attribue à Mme Maigret, la personne sans doute qui connaît le mieux "de l'intérieur" les réactions du commissaire: "Elle n'en savait guère plus que les journaux, mais, ce que les journaux ignoraient, c'est avec quelle énergie il essayait de comprendre, quelle concentration était la sienne au cours de certaines enquêtes. On aurait dit qu'il s'identifiait à ceux qu'il traquait et qu'il souffrait les mêmes affres qu'eux."

La confession tragique du meurtrier nous laisse comme un goût amer: il s'est délivré, en remettant son sort entre les mains de Maigret, de ses angoisses, mais la situation n'en est pas meilleure pour autant: les soins qu'il réclamait ne pourront lui être donnés, et il sera condamné à une détention "ordinaire", sans véritable espoir de guérison. Comment l'auteur pouvait-il mieux exprimer son sentiment de l'inutilité de la justice des hommes face à la question, sans réponse, de la responsabilité...

2. Au cinéma, pour se changer les idées

A la fin du chapitre 4, Maigret téléphone à sa femme pour lui annoncer qu'il rentre dîner, et lui proposer d'aller au cinéma, "pour se changer les idées".

Si Maigret aime aller au cinéma, ce n'est pas tellement pour le film lui-même – il est assez simple dans ses goûts de ce point de vue-là: il aime les westerns, et les films comiques des années 20 et 30: Charlot et Laurel et Hardy (NEW). En fait, ce qu'il aime au cinéma, c'est le fait d'y aller en compagnie de sa femme.

Au début du corpus, on rencontre peu d'allusions au cinéma: c'est en suivant Pietr le Letton (LET) qu'il entre dans un cinéma, où on donne un "film puéril". Maigret suit à peine les images, se contentant de ruminer sur son enquête. C'est un peu la même "technique" qu'il reprend dans la scène mémorable de CEC, où l'on voit "Maigret, les deux mains dans les poches, la pipe aux dents, déambuler boulevard Montparnasse, l'air grognon, s'arrêter devant un cinéma permanent". Il demande un fauteuil de balcon, s'installe, engoncé dans son pardessus, et "dans cet état d'engourdissement physique, [son] esprit, comme dans les rêves, saisissait des rapports parfois saugrenus, suivait des chemins que la pure raison n'aurait pas découverts... [...] C'est ainsi qu'il pensait sans penser, par bribes, par morceaux d'idées qu'il n'essayait pas de mettre bout à bout."

Mais, à part cette utilisation "professionnelle" du cinéma, c'est surtout pour le plaisir de partager un bon moment avec Mme Maigret que le commissaire se rend au cinéma. Et c'est particulièrement dans la période Presses de la Cité, où Mme Maigret prend de plus en plus d'importance, que l'on verra le couple se rendre, bras dessus bras dessous, dans un cinéma de quartier, par exemple sur le boulevard Bonne Nouvelle (BAN, CLI), ou le boulevard des Italiens (MME), ou, plus rarement, dans une grande salle des Champs-Elysées (AMU).

3. Les loisirs de Maigret

Le roman, aux deux tiers de son déroulement, est entrecoupé par le séjour dominical des Maigret dans leur maison de Meung. C'est comme si Maigret – et derrière lui son auteur – avait besoin de cette pause pour retrouver son élan avant d'affronter la dernière partie de l'enquête et l'interrogatoire final du meurtrier.

Que fait Maigret quand il se rend à Meung, ou quand il lui arrive, plutôt rarement, de prendre une pause pendant une enquête et de quitter la capitale ? En un mot, à quoi occupe-t-il ses (rares) loisirs ?

Ce qu'on peut dire tout d'abord, c'est que ses activités sont, d'une part, peu variées, et, d'autre part, qu'elles sont déjà les mêmes que celles qu'il adoptera à la retraite.

Maigret pratique d'abord le jardinage, façon peut-être de retrouver un peu le goût d'une enfance campagnarde, et de renouer le contact avec la terre. Que cultive-t-il dans son "jardin de curé" ? Des laitues et des tomates (not), des melons (not, NEW), des petits pois, des salades et des aubergines (FAC).

Son autre activité importante est la pêche: truite des ruisseaux d'Alsace (GUI), brochet de la Loire (MAI), perche encore de la Loire (ceu) ou gardons de la Seine (COL). Maigret pêche à la ligne, et même il y excelle, d'après ce qu'en disent les gens de Meung (TUE).

Le troisième loisir auquel le commissaire s'adonne est le jeu, essentiellement les cartes. Il lui arrive, plutôt rarement, de jouer au billard (JUG, AMU), mais ce sont plutôt les cartes qui ont sa préférence. S'il pratique la manille (ceu), le nain jaune (OMB), ou le bridge (GUI), même s'il se défend parfois de savoir jouer à ce dernier jeu, ce qui lui donne un excellent prétexte pour regarder jouer les autres, dont le comportement au jeu révèlent beaucoup sur leur façon d'être (VAC, PEU), c'est la belote qui a sa préférence (JUG, NEW, ASS, TUE, BRA).

Ce séjour à Meung est une petite halte en même temps qu'une préfiguration de ce qui attendra Maigret à la retraite: quant il n'aura plus à s'occuper des meurtriers, quand il n'aura plus à se plonger dans une descente au tréfonds de l'âme humaine, il pourra passer son temps à jouer aux cartes et à entretenir son jardin, tandis que mijotera un ragoût dont le parfum se mêlera à celui de l'encaustique des meubles bien cirés. Oui, ce sera le repos... mais le commissaire y sera-t-il vraiment heureux, au point de ne point avoir de regrets de l'ambiance des cafés et des rues de Paris ....

3. Les loisirs de Maigret

Le roman, aux deux tiers de son déroulement, est entrecoupé par le séjour dominical des Maigret dans leur maison de Meung. C'est comme si Maigret – et derrière lui son auteur – avait besoin de cette pause pour retrouver son élan avant d'affronter la dernière partie de l'enquête et l'interrogatoire final du meurtrier.

Que fait Maigret quand il se rend à Meung, ou quand il lui arrive, plutôt rarement, de prendre une pause pendant une enquête et de quitter la capitale ? En un mot, à quoi occupe-t-il ses (rares) loisirs ?

Ce qu'on peut dire tout d'abord, c'est que ses activités sont, d'une part, peu variées, et, d'autre part, qu'elles sont déjà les mêmes que celles qu'il adoptera à la retraite.

Maigret pratique d'abord le jardinage, façon peut-être de retrouver un peu le goût d'une enfance campagnarde, et de renouer le contact avec la terre. Que cultive-t-il dans son "jardin de curé" ? Des laitues et des tomates (not), des melons (not, NEW), des petits pois, des salades et des aubergines (FAC).

Son autre activité importante est la pêche: truite des ruisseaux d'Alsace (GUI), brochet de la Loire (MAI), perche encore de la Loire (ceu) ou gardons de la Seine (COL). Maigret pêche à la ligne, et même il y excelle, d'après ce qu'en disent les gens de Meung (TUE).

Le troisième loisir auquel le commissaire s'adonne est le jeu, essentiellement les cartes. Il lui arrive, plutôt rarement, de jouer au billard (JUG, AMU), mais ce sont plutôt les cartes qui ont sa préférence. S'il pratique la manille (ceu), le nain jaune (OMB), ou le bridge (GUI), même s'il se défend parfois de savoir jouer à ce dernier jeu, ce qui lui donne un excellent prétexte pour regarder jouer les autres, dont le comportement au jeu révèlent beaucoup sur leur façon d'être (VAC, PEU), c'est la belote qui a sa préférence (JUG, NEW, ASS, TUE, BRA).

Ce séjour à Meung est une petite halte en même temps qu'une préfiguration de ce qui attendra Maigret à la retraite: quant il n'aura plus à s'occuper des meurtriers, quand il n'aura plus à se plonger dans une descente au tréfonds de l'âme humaine, il pourra passer son temps à jouer aux cartes et à entretenir son jardin, tandis que mijotera un ragoût dont le parfum se mêlera à celui de l'encaustique des meubles bien cirés. Oui, ce sera le repos... mais le commissaire y sera-t-il vraiment heureux, au point de ne point avoir de regrets de l'ambiance des cafés et des rues de Paris ....

Murielle Wenger

English translation

 

Home  Bibliography  Reference  Forum  Plots  Texts  Simenon  Gallery  Shopping  Film  Links