Bibliography  Reference  Forum  Plots  Texts  Simenon  Gallery  Shopping  Film  Links

Maigret of the Month: Maigret et la jeune morte (Inspector Maigret and the Dead Girl, Maigret and the Young Girl)
10/4/07 –

Maigret et la jeune morte translates literally into English as Maigret and the young dead girl, and it has appeared in English under two titles, first as Inspector Maigret and the Dead Girl, and then as Maigret and the Young Girl, both the translation by Daphne Woodward. It was last published in English almost 35 years ago, and so is somewhat difficult to find. One of only five Maigrets not published in a Penguin edition, apparently the only paperbacks of the title were the U.S. Avon edition (1957) , and the British Arrow editions (1958, 1965).


Avon (1957)

Arrow (1958)

Arrow (1965)

Interesting how the blue dress of the story – the first clue – has changed color on those two covers…

It's unfortunate that it's not more easily obtainable (though used copies of the Companion Book Club edition (1956) are fairly easy to locate on the net) because in many ways it's almost an archetype of the Chief Inspector's legendary ability to get into the skin of a victim or perpetrator… At the denouement of the story, we find the marvelous dialogue spanning Chapters 8 and 9, which begins,

"How did you guess?"
Maigret replied calmly, "I didn't guess. I knew at once…
You see … at first glance your story is perfect, almost too perfect, and I'd have bought it if I hadn't known the girl." …
"You knew her?!"
"I came to know her quite well…"

From there Maigret goes on to tell what he knows must have happened, as opposed to the lies he'd been told, in what must have seemed a stupifying display of clairvoyance. It almost rings of Sherlock Holmes!

And there's more to the resemblance between this novel and Maigret's Dead Man (Maigret et son mort) than just the titles. Both begin with the discovery of a body, dumped from a car in a public square, where the identity of the victim is unknown, and where the discovery of the victim's identity forms the first part of the mystery. In both cases it's Maigret's empathy with the victim which leads him to the discovery of the criminals. As Murielle wrote of Maigret et son mort (MoM - May '06), "...it's one of most typical with regard to the way the Chief Inspector "works" with his intuition, and it also illustrates the relationship that he can form with a victim he is involved with." The same might well be said to apply to Maigret et la jeune morte.

However, in this case, Maigret has the "assistance" of Inspector Lognon, whose portrait Murielle assembled for us last year in her Lognon Special. Here we get to see him as a tireless, astute, and, for the most part, successful investigator... until the critical moment when fate catches up with him, as it always seems to...

This is the only novel in which I recall Maigret longing for onion soup... I'm hoping Murielle will fill us in on this, as well as perhaps the references to the "Exchange", the central clearing house for the call boxes all over the city which seems to crop up in the stories now and then...

ST

Maigret of the Month: Maigret et la jeune morte (Inspector Maigret and the Dead Girl, Maigret and the Young Girl)
10/11/07 –

[translation]

1. Concerning Maigret, Lognon and young girls....

This novel is one of my favorite Maigrets, for a number of reasons. First, it is characteristic, in the sense that in it Simenon describes the "little world of Paris", with its cast of more or less picturesque characters. And, as Steve wrote, he shows us Maigret at work in his empathetic way of leading an investigation. It's not by brilliant logical deduction that the Chief Inspector discovers the truth, but because he has gotten to know Louise, from the inside, we might say... by his extraordinary faculty of "putting himself into the skin" of others, he has succeeded by knowing that the behavior the young girl was purported to have shown in Albert's bar did not gibe with that of Louise at all.

This novel is one of those in which Maigret deals with young girls, and this rapport which he establishes with young females is one of the most interesting aspects of the Chief Inspector's investigations... In the long train of young girls or young women encountered by the Chief Inspector, we can certainly note Félicie (FEL), Cécile (CEC), Arlette (PIC), Berthe and Emma (SIG), another Emma (JAU), Else (NUI), Anna (FLA), Julie (POR), Céline (eto), etc. In this regard we can examine once more Robert Jouanny's text. Let's also note this significant detail, emanating more or less unconsciously from the author... have you noticed that numerous young girls and young women, with whom Maigret develops a special relationship, are named Louise? Consider Louise Sabati (PEU), Louise Fillon (TRO) and Louise Laboine. Even more significantly, Mme Maigret herself is named Louise...

Finally, I also like this novel because the adaptation which was made for the television series with Jean Richard is one of the most successful, and the actor knew well how to render the "intimate" rapport which was established between the Chief Inspector and the victim.

It's true that this novel evokes Maigret's Dead Man (Maigret et son mort ) in many aspects, but it also makes me think of Maigret in Montmartre (Maigret au Picratt's), in the sense that there, also, a very strong rapport is established between Maigret and Arlette. By small strokes, Simenon draws the two young girls closer together, even if there are great differences between their lives. For example, Louise is found missing a shoe, we see "her toes through the silk stocking"; with Arlette, the same image, "a shoeless foot, whose toes show through the silk stocking". Also, in both stories, we find Maigret grappling with Lognon, who has not at all the same attitude as the Chief Inspector with regard to victims. Lognon reacts in a "professional" way, following Louise's trail as a policeman should, but without having recourse to the intuition which is Maigret's strength, and which leads to his triumph... "Technically, [Lognon] made no errors, and no police course could teach him to put himself into the skin of a young girl" (Ch. 9), but...! It is just this power of empathy which permits Maigret to discover the truth...

2. Where we discover Emergency Services (Police-Secours) and those in Criminal Records...

I don't mind answering Steve's questions with regard to Police-Secours and onion soup... I'll get to the soup in a little while, as for the moment we'll make a visit to Police-Secours. In fact, mention of this locale does not occur before the story The North-Star, written around 1937-38. This can no doubt be explained by the fact that Simenon didn't actually "discover" it until the 1930s, when Xavier Guichard invited him backstage at the police, as reported by Simenon in texts appearing in 1934 in Paris-Soir. In 1937, he would put out another series of texts, entitled "Police-Secours, or, The New Mysteries of Paris", in which he describes precisely the locale of Police-Secours and the activities taking place there. These two sets of texts have been collected in the volume, "Simenon, my apprenticeship" (Simenon, mes apprentissages)", from Omnibus. Here are some extracts...

"In the large room with the iron door, but two windows open to the night, there are four, four peaceful officers, with two of them wearing gray smocks... On the left, an enormous piece of furniture which resembles a telephone switchboard, in which hundreds of little lamps are ready to light. On the right, a telegraphic device which runs from one moment to the next. Finally, above... we hear the steps of a "solitary", a fifth officer who, he alone, waits before his equipment to send out radio calls. ... Just now a lamp, as big as a lozenge, lights up on the map of Paris attached to the wall. It's the lamp of the 13th arrondissement and its blinking signifies that the Police-Secours car of that arrondissement has just left. ... Already the operator has taken up the telephone which will put him in direct connection with the principal station of the 13th. ... The station there, Place d'Italie, is not yet aware. It's one of their agents who has broken the glass of the call box on the Rue de Tolbiac, thus requesting reinforcements. ... I am once again in this vast room at Police Headquarters where hundreds of bulbs, lit or unlit, are such witnesses of the dramas of Paris. ... I am for the last time at the heart of this network of lines which transcribe to the illuminated table of the Central Bureau all the diverse facts of Paris. It is night. There are five of us in the midst of the apparatus which goes on and off intermittently."

As said above, this department is mentioned in eto, where it's a call from the officer on duty at Police-Secours which will clinch Maigret's investigation. Police-Secours is mentioned in many novels, sometimes when Maigret receives a call from them, sometimes when he calls them himself to learn if something has happened in Paris. A more precise description of the room is found in three novels. It's how Maigret and the Fortune-Teller (Signé Picpus) opens, at Police-Secours... "Three minutes to five. A white bulb lights up on the immense map of Paris which covers one entire section of wall. A worker sets down his sandwich, inserts a plug into one of a thousand holes of a telephone switchboard." Later, the locale is described as a "room which is like the brain of Police-Secours." It's there that Maigret has come to await the announcement of the possible murder of a fortune-teller...

Another novel begins at Police-Secours, or to be exact, a story, Maigret and the Surly Inspector. Maigret, " bored, alone in his office", awaiting an important phone call, crosses the street. "It was comfortable, a little heavy, in the vast room of Police-Secours, where Maigret had come for refuge." There he found his nephew Daniel, with whom he exchanged some family news. But it was "impossible to finish a sentence of any length... invariably, one of the little lamps would light up on the immense map of Paris which covered one whole section of the wall." There follows next in the text a lengthy explanation of Maigret's relationship with the place... "Maigret had always liked this immense room, calm and neat like a laboratory, unknown to most Parisians, but which was, however, the very heart of Paris. At every intersection in the city, there are red-painted devices, with a glass that has simply to be broken to connect automatically with the police station of the district by telephone, as well as with the central station. Does someone call for help for some reason or another? Immediately one of the lights goes on on the giant map. And the man on duty hears the call at the same moment as the officer in the nearest station. Below, in the dark and peaceful courtyard of the Prefecture, there are two cars filled with officers ready to be sent out for emergencies. In sixty police stations, other cars wait, as well as bicycle officers. ... All day long, all night long, the dramatic life of the capital comes thus to be written in little lamps on a wall; no car, no patrol leaves one of the stations without the reason for its movement being reported to the center. Maigret had always maintained that young inspectors should be required to serve at least a year in this department to learn the criminal geography of the city, and he himself, in his free moments, came there happily to spend an hour or two." On Maigret's relationship with this division, we can read this text by Modenesi, which refers to this story. It's precisely the breaking of the glass of a call box which is the origin of the investigation which unfolds for Maigret...

We find Police-Secours in Maigret's Memoirs, in Ch. 7: "11:00 o'clock at night. A telephone rings in the Police-Secours Center, across the way, in the municipal police building, where all the calls are centralized and become displayed on an illuminated tableau which takes up the width of the wall."

Finally, it's in a non-Maigret story, that the action is based on the Police-Secours Central, Seven Little Crosses in a Notebook. Officer Lecoeur, who is on duty that night, has the habit of marking in a notebook little Xs, in columns corresponding to the type of call received... drunken brawls, suicides, car thefts, etc.

Lecoeur works "in front of a telephone switchboard with a hundred plugs": "A lamp as big as an aspirin tablet lights up on one of the walls... A gigantic map of Paris was painted on the wall across from him, with small lamps indicating the police stations. As soon as one of these was alerted for some reason, its lamp lit up, and Lecoeur connected his plug." We learn further that the room has "great curtainless windows", that it is painted "a yellowish color". The action begins when the glass of a call-box is broken, for some unknown reason. Then, there will be six more broken, until Lecoeur realizes that someone is calling for help... they will learn that it's a young boy who is following the trail of a serial killer... I won't say any more, leaving you readers to find for yourself this fine story, which was also made into a television episode in the Bruno Crémer series...

Since we're visiting the area of the Police, you'll note that mention is also made, in Maigret and the Young Girl, of the Criminal Records area, where... "on miles of shelves are aligned the dossiers of all those who have fallen afoul of the law." (Ch. 6). So I've decided to take you on a little tour of this place, and to show you how it is described in the text. The Criminal Records room is found "under the attic of the Palais de Justice" (amo), next to the laboratory, separated from it by "a spiral staircase" (ibid.), "poorly lit, which resembled a staircase taken from a chateau" (MME). If you don't mind, we'll save our visit to the laboratory, Moers's fiefdom, for another article, and for today, deal with the Records room. The employees there are dressed in long grey smocks, and one of them is "ancient and sucks on violet lozenges." (AMI). They work with more than "80,000" files (PRO), contained in "iron cabinets" (PRO), and holding the prints of all those who have passed through the anthrompometric services. Maigret calls on these workers in numerous novels, which are, in addition to those already mentioned, MME, MOR, BAN, CHA, PAR, FAN, ENF and IND.

3. Where we move from onion soup to Pernod...

To answer Steve's second question, onion soup is only eaten by Maigret in one other novel in the corpus: In Maigret and the Fortune-Teller (Signé Picpus), Maigret and Le Cloaguen-Picard have onion soup au gratin, before eating a copious choucroute garnie (Ch. 9). I can find no other mention of onion soup in the corpus, so Steve is (almost) right!

Since we're considering gastronomic allusions, you will have noticed that Maigret, in this novel of the young girl, takes many opportunities to drink Pernod, often synonymous for him with the Midi, or summer heat. If he orders a Pernod "mechanically" in Ch. 4, isn't it because he's evoking Louise's past in Nice? And later, if he chooses Pernod again in chapters 7 and 8, he's succumbing to his "mania" for keeping to one kind of drink during a case... "If I start one of these investigation with a Vouvray, for example, because I find myself in a bistro where that's the specialty, I tend to continue with Vouvray..." (VIC). According to Jacques Sacré, in his study Bon appétit, commissaire Maigret, from Éditions du Céfal, pastis is the aperitif Maigret drinks the most: "The premier of aperitifs, that of masculine friendship, that of smiling conviviality and a wink at vacations is without contest, pastis (35% of the liqueurs aperitifs [cited]). An amusing detail, Maigret has never told us if he drinks it straight... he's shared the description of the amber liquid becoming opaline by the addition of cold water. When he speaks of it, he mentions pastis, Pernod, Anise..." Here's the list of novels in which Maigret savors the opaline drink: JAU (the important role of the drink poisoned by Emma), GUI, LIB, MAI; ceu, MAJ; AMI, GRA, REV, PEU, ECO, MIN, COL; HES, IND and CHA.

4. Which deals with chronology, and the reconstruction of the life of a young girl...

"The gaps were now almost all filled. It had become possible to reconstruct the life of the young girl from the moment she had left her mother, in Nice, to the night she found Jeanine at Romeo's. ... All that remained was to find how she spent her time during about two hours of her final night." And if we try to "play the Chief Inspector" and to recreate this timetable of a life? By rereading the novel and assembling the clues scattered through the text, I've come up with this chronology:

* at 16, Louise leaves for Paris, she meets Jeanine on the train, who lets her stay secretly at Mlle Poré's, where she stays about 6 months.

* thrown out of there, she finds Jeanine again at Rue de Ponthieu, and the young girls share an apartment for about 2 years.

* 6 months before her death, towards October, Louise leaves the Rue de Ponthieu for a furnished room on Rue d'Aboukir; during the winter, she works for a store, in the section of sale goods sold on the sidewalk.

* beginning of January, she takes a room with Mme Cremieux, Rue de Clichy.

* in February, she gets a phone call, spends the night out, not returning till morning; where did she go? We don't find out, because it isn't this time that she goes for the first time to Mlle Irene's; if it was also in February that she rented a dress to try to enter Maxim's, it was not this same evening; who was the phone call from? her mother? Jeanine? I haven't found any clear answer to the questions...

* in March, a Sunday, Mme Cremieux throws her out; Monday, 9:00 in the evening, she goes to Mlle Irene's to rent a dress; she stops in a bar on Rue Caumartin, where she tries to telephone someone around midnight (probably Jeanine at Romeo's); there she drinks three grogs; at midnight, she goes to Romeo's, where she finds Jeanine, who tells her of the contents of the letter; she then crosses the city on Boulevard Haussmann, then Faubourg Saint-Honoré, towards the Champs-Elysées. Around 1:00 a.m., she arrives at Pickwick's-Bar, Rue de l'Etoile. A little before 2:00, she is attacked by Albert's accomplice, who leaves her body in Place Vintimille, where it is discovered about 3:00 a.m...


Murielle Wenger

translation: S. Trussel
Honolulu, October 2007

original French

Maigret of the Month: Maigret et la jeune morte (Inspector Maigret and the Dead Girl, Maigret and the Young Girl)
10/8/07 –

1. Où il est question de Maigret, de Lognon et des jeunes filles....

Ce roman est l'un de mes préférés dans le cycle des Maigret, pour plusieurs raisons: d'abord, il est caractéristique, dans le sens où Simenon y dépeint le "petit monde de Paris", avec son cortège de personnages plus ou moins pittoresques. Ensuite, comme l'a écrit Steve, il nous montre Maigret à l'œuvre dans sa façon empathique de mener une enquête. Ce n'est pas par de brillantes déductions logiques que le commissaire découvre la vérité, mais c'est parce qu'il a appris à connaître Louise, de l'intérieur pourrait-on dire: par son extraordinaire faculté à se "mettre dans la peau" des autres, il a réussi à comprendre que le comportement que la jeune fille a soi-disant eu dans le bar d'Albert ne correspondait pas du tout à ce qu'était Louise.

De plus, ce roman fait partie de ceux qui voient Maigret aux prises avec des jeunes filles, et c'est un de aspects les plus intéressants des enquêtes du commissaire que ce rapport qu'il établit avec de jeunes êtres féminins: dans le long cortège de jeunes filles ou jeunes femmes rencontrées par le commissaire, on citera bien sûr Félicie (FEL), Cécile (CEC), Arlette (PIC), Berthe et Emma (SIG), une autre Emma (JAU), Else (NUI), Anna (FLA), Julie (POR), Céline (eto), etc. On renverra ici une fois de plus au texte de Robert Jouanny. Notons aussi ce détail significatif, et plus ou moins sorti de l'inconscient de l'auteur: avez-vous remarqué que nombres de jeunes filles ou jeunes femmes avec lesquelles Maigret entretient un rapport privilégié ont pour prénom Louise ? Citons Louise Sabati (PEU), Louise Fillon (TRO) et Louise Laboine. Le fait est d'autant plus significatif que Mme Maigret s'appelle, elle aussi, Louise...

Enfin, ce roman me plait aussi parce que l'adaptation qui en a été faite dans la série télévisée avec Jean Richard est l'une des plus réussies, et l'acteur a su très bien rendre ce rapport "intime" qui s'établit entre le commissaire et la victime.

C'est vrai que ce roman évoque Maigret et son mort par bien des aspects, mais il me fait penser aussi à Maigret au Picratt's, dans le sens où là aussi, c'est un rapport très fort qui s'établit entre Maigret et Arlette. Par petites touches, Simenon pousse au rapprochement entre les deux filles, même s'il y a de grandes différences entre leurs vies: par exemple, le cadavre de Louise a un pied déchaussé, et on voit "les doigts de pied à travers le bas de soie"; chez Arlette, la même image: "un pied déchaussé, dont on distinguait les orteils à travers un bas de soie". Dans les deux histoires aussi, on retrouve Maigret aux prises avec Lognon, qui n'a pas du tout la même attitude que le commissaire face aux victimes: Lognon réagit de façon "professionnelle", suivant la piste de Louise comme doit le faire un policier, mais sans avoir recours à l'intuition qui est la force de Maigret et qui fait finalement triompher le commissaire: "Techniquement, [Lognon] n'avait commis aucune faute, et aucun cours de police n'apprend à se mettre dans la peau d'une jeune fille" (chapitre 9), et pourtant ! Il n'y a que cette force d'empathie qui permettra à Maigret de découvrir la vérité...

2. Où l'on découvre Police-Secours et les Sommiers...

Je m'en voudrais de ne pas répondre aux interrogations de Steve à propos de Police Secours et de la soupe à l'oignon... Je parlerai de la soupe plus bas, et pour le moment nous allons visiter Police Secours. En fait, la mention de ce local n'intervient pas avant la nouvelle L'Etoile-du-Nord, rédigée vers 1937-38. On peut sans doute expliquer cela par le fait que Simenon n'a vraiment "découvert" ce local que dans ces années 1930 où Xavier Guichard l'invite à découvrir les coulisses de la police, découverte que Simenon relatera dans les textes parus en 1934 dans "Paris-Soir". En 1937, il fera paraître une autre série de textes, intitulée "Police-Secours ou Les nouveaux mystères de Paris", dans lesquels il décrit justement le local de Police-Secours et les activités qui s'y déroulent. Ces deux séries de textes ont été recueillies dans le volume "Simenon, mes apprentissages", paru aux éditions Omnibus. Voici quelques extraits de ces textes:

"Dans la grande pièce que ferme une porte de fer, mais dont les deux fenêtres sont ouvertes sur la nuit, ils sont quatre, quatre fonctionnaires paisibles, et deux d'entre eux ont revêtu une blouse grise [...] A gauche, se dresse un énorme meuble qui ressemble à un central téléphonique et où des centaines de petites lampes sont prêtes à s'allumer. A droite, c'est un émetteur télégraphique qui va fonctionner d'un instant à l'autre. Enfin, au dessus [...] nous entendons les pas du "solitaire", un cinquième fonctionnaire qui, lui, est tout seul, attendant devant ses appareils de lancer quelque appel par radio. [...] Justement, une lampe, grosse comme une pastille, vient de s'allumer sur le plan de Paris appliqué au mur. C'est la lampe du XIIIe arrondissement et son clignotement signifie que le car de Police-Secours de cet arrondissement vient de sortir. [...] Déjà l'opérateur a saisi le téléphone qui le met en relation directe avec le poste principal du XIIIe. [...] Le poste, là-bas, place d'Italie, ne sait pas encore. C'est un de ses agents qui a brisé la glace de l'avertisseur de la rue de Tolbiac, demandant ainsi du renfort. [...] Je suis à nouveau dans cette vaste pièce de la Préfecture de Police où des centaines de disques éteints ou lumineux sont autant de témoins des drames de Paris.[...] Je suis pour la dernière fois au cœur de ce réseau de fils qui transcrivent au tableau lumineux du bureau central tous les faits divers de Paris. Il fait nuit. Nous sommes cinq au milieu des appareils qui fonctionnent par intermittence."

Comme dit plus haut, il est fait mention de ce local dans eto, où c'est un appel de l'inspecteur de garde à Police-Secours qui va déclencher l'enquête de Maigret. On trouve la mention de Police-Secours dans plusieurs romans, soit que Maigret en reçoive un appel, soit qu'il y téléphone lui-même pour savoir si quelque chose s'est passé à Paris. Une description plus précise du local est faite dans trois romans: c'est ainsi que Signé Picpus s'ouvre dans le local de Police-Secours: "Cinq heures moins trois. Une pastille blanche s'éclaire dans l'immense plan de Paris qui couvre tout un pan de mur. Un employé dépose son sandwich, enfonce une fiche dans un des mille trous d'un standard téléphonique." Plus loin, le local est décrit comme une "pièce qui est comme le cerveau de Police-Secours." C'est là que Maigret est venu attendre l'annonce d'un hypothétique crime sur une voyante...

Un autre roman commence à Police-Secours, ou, pour être plus exact, il s'agit d'une nouvelle: Maigret et l'inspecteur Malgracieux. Maigret, qui "s'ennuyait, tout seul dans son bureau", à attendre un coup de téléphone important, a traversé la rue: "Il faisait bon, un peu lourd, dans la vaste salle de Police-Secours, où Maigret était venu se réfugier." Il y retrouve son neveu Daniel, avec qui il échange des nouvelles de la famille. Mais "impossible de finir une phrase un peu longue: invariablement, une des petites pastilles s'éclairait dans l'immense plan de Paris qui s'étalait sur tout un pan de mur." Suit ensuite dans le texte une longue explication sur le rapport de Maigret avec ce local: "Maigret avait toujours aimé cette immense salle, calme et nette comme un laboratoire, inconnue de la plupart des Parisiens, et qui était pourtant le cœur même de Paris. A tous les carrefours de la ville, il existe des appareils peints en rouge, avec une glace qu'il suffit de briser pour être automatiquement en rapport téléphonique avec le poste de police du quartier en même temps qu'avec le poste central. Quelqu'un appelle-t-il au secours pour une raison ou pour une autre ? Aussitôt, une des pastilles s'allume sur le plan monumental. Et l'homme de garde entend l'appel au même instant que le brigadier du poste de police le plus proche. En bas, dans la cour obscure et calme de la Préfecture, il y a deux cars pleins d'agents prêts à s'élancer dans les cas graves. Dans soixante postes de police, d'autres cars attendent, ainsi que des agents cyclistes. [...] Toute la journée, toute la nuit, la vie dramatique de la capitale vient ainsi s'inscrire en petites lumières sur un mur; aucun car, aucune patrouille ne sort d'un des commissariats sans que la raison de son déplacement soit signalée au centre. Maigret a toujours prétendu que les jeunes inspecteurs devraient être tenus de faire un stage d'un an au moins dans cette salle afin d'y apprendre la géographie criminelle de la capitale, et lui-même, à ses moments perdus, vient volontiers y passer une heure ou deux." Sur le rapport de Maigret avec ce local, on pourra lire le texte de Modenesi, qui fait référence à cette nouvelle. C'est justement le bris de la vitre d'un appareil de secours qui est à l'origine de l'enquête qui démarre pour Maigret...

On retrouve Police-Secours dans Les Mémoires de Maigret, au chapitre 7: "Onze heures du soir. Un coup de téléphone du centre de Police-Secours, en face, dans les bâtiments de la police municipale, où tous les appels sont centralisés et viennent s'inscrire sur un tableau lumineux qui occupe la largeur d'un mur."

Enfin, c'est dans une nouvelle hors du cycle des Maigret, que l'action du récit est basée sur le central de Police-Secours: il s'agit de Sept petites croix dans un carnet. L'agent Lecoeur, qui est de garde cette nuit-là, a pour habitude de tracer dans un carnet des petites croix, dans les colonnes correspondant au genre d'appel reçu: rixes entre ivrognes, suicides, vols de voitures, etc.

Lecoeur travaille "devant son standard téléphonique aux centaines de fiches": "Une lumière grande comme un cachet d'aspirine, s'alluma sur un des murs. [...] Un gigantesque plan de Paris était peint sur le mur, en face de lui, et les petites lampes qui s'y allumaient représentaient les postes de police. Dès qu'un de ceux-ci était alerté pour une raison quelconque, l'ampoule s'éclairait, Lecoeur poussait sa fiche." On apprend encore que le local a de "grandes fenêtres sans rideaux", qu'il est de "couleur jaunâtre". L'action va démarrer lorsque la glace d'une borne est brisée, sans qu'on n'en sache d'abord la raison. Puis, ce seront six autres bornes qui seront brisées, jusqu'à ce que Lecoeur comprenne que quelqu'un appelle au secours: on découvrira qu'il s'agit d'un jeune garçon qui est sur la trace d'un tueur en série...Je n'en dirai pas plus, à vous lecteurs de vous plonger dans cette très jolie nouvelle, qui a d'ailleurs fait l'objet d'un épisode dans la série télévisée avec Bruno Crémer...

Puisque nous voilà dans la visite de locaux de la police, vous aurez vu qu'il est aussi fait mention, dans Maigret et la jeune morte, du local des Sommiers, où "sur des kilomètres de rayonnages, s'alignaient les dossiers de tous ceux qui ont eu des démêlés avec la justice." (chapitre 6). J'ai donc décidé de vous emmener faire un tour dans cette pièce, et de vous la montrer telle qu'elle est décrite dans le corpus. La salle des Sommiers se trouve "sous les combles du Palais de Justice" (amo), à côté du laboratoire de l'Identité judiciaire, séparée de celui-ci par "un escalier en colimaçon" (ibid.), "mal éclairé, qui ressemblait à quelque escalier dérobé de château" (MME). Si vous le voulez bien, nous réserverons notre visite au laboratoire de l'Identité, le fief de Moers, à un autre article, et nous en resterons pour aujourd'hui aux Sommiers. Les employés y sont vêtus de longues blouses grises, et l'un deux est "chenu [et] suce des bonbons à la violette." (AMI). Ils travaillent sur plus de "quatre-vingt mille" fiches (PRO), contenues dans "des armoires de fer" (PRO), et portant les empreintes de tous ceux qui ont passé par le service d'anthropométrie. Maigret fait appel à ces fichiers dans de nombreux romans, qui sont, à part ceux déjà cités, MME, MOR, BAN, CHA, PAR, FAN, ENF et IND.

3. Où l'on passe de la soupe à l'oignon au Pernod...

Pour répondre à la seconde question de Steve, il n'est question de soupe à l'oignon mangée par Maigret que dans un seul autre roman du corpus: c'est dans Signé Picpus que Maigret partage avec Le Cloaguen-Picard une soupe à l'oignon gratinée, avant de déguster une plantureuse choucroute garnie (chapitre 9). Je n'ai pas trouvé trace d'autres mentions de soupe à l'oignon: Steve avait donc (presque) raison !

Puisque nous voici aux allusions gastronomiques, vous aurez remarqué que Maigret, dans ce roman de la jeune morte, déguste à plusieurs reprises du Pernod, souvent synonyme pour lui du midi ou de la chaleur de l'été: s'il commande "machinalement" au chapitre 4, un Pernod, n'est-ce pas parce qu'il vient d'évoquer le passé de Louise à Nice ? Ensuite, s'il reprend du Pernod aux chapitre 7 et 8, c'est qu'il sacrifie à sa "manie" de mener une enquête avec un alcool déterminé: "Si je commence une de ces enquêtes au vouvray, par exemple, parce que je me trouve dans un bistrot dont c'est la spécialité, j'ai tendance à la continuer au vouvray..." (VIC). D'après Jacques Sacré, dans son étude Bon appétit, commissaire Maigret, parue aux éditions du Céfal, le pastis est l'apéritif le plus consommé par Maigret: "Le premier des apéritifs, celui de l'amitié virile, celui de la convivialité souriante et du clin d'œil aux vacances est sans conteste le pastis (35% des liqueurs et apéritifs [cités]). Détail amusant, Maigret ne nous a jamais dit s'il le buvait sec: il nous a privés de la description du liquide ambré devenant opalin par l'adjonction d'une eau bien fraîche. Quand il en parle, il cite le pastis, le pernod, l'anis, la boisson anisée." Voici la liste des romans dans lesquels Maigret savoure la boisson opaline: JAU (rôle important de la boisson empoisonnée par Emma), GUI, LIB, MAI; ceu, MAJ; AMI, GRA, REV, PEU, ECO, MIN, COL; HES, IND et CHA.

4. Où il est question de chronologie, et de reconstitution de la vie d'une jeune fille...

"Les vides, maintenant, étaient presque tous remplis. Il devenait possible de reconstituer l'histoire de la jeune fille depuis le moment où elle avait quitté sa mère, à Nice, jusqu'à la nuit où elle avait retrouvé Jeanine au Roméo. [...] Il ne restait à reconstituer que son emploi du temps pendant à peu près deux heures la dernière nuit." Et si nous essayions de "jouer au commissaire" et d'établir cet emploi du temps ? En relisant tout le roman, et en rassemblant les indices éparpillés dans le texte, je me suis amusée à établir cette chronologie:

* à 16 ans, Louise part à Paris, elle rencontre Jeanine dans le train, celle-ci la fait loger en cachette chez Mlle Poré, où elle reste environ 6 mois

* chassée de là, elle retrouve Jeanine rue de Ponthieu, et les jeunes filles partagent un appartement pendant environ deux ans

* 6 mois avant sa mort, soit vers octobre, Louise quitte la rue de Ponthieu et s'installe dans un meublé rue d'Aboukir; pendant l'hiver, elle travaille pour un magasin, dans un rayon de soldes installé sur le trottoir

* début janvier, elle prend une chambre chez Mme Crêmieux, rue de Clichy

* en février, elle reçoit un coup de téléphone, passe la nuit dehors et ne rentre qu'au matin; où est-elle allée ? On ne le saura pas, car ce n'est pas cette fois-là qu'elle se rend pour la première fois chez Mlle Irène; si c'est aussi en février qu'elle loue la robe pour essayer d'entrer au Maxim's, ce n'est pas le même soir; de qui était le coup de téléphone ? de sa mère ? de Jeanine ? Je n'ai pas trouvé de réponse claire à la question...

* En mars, un dimanche, Mme Crêmieux la met à la porte; le lundi, à neuf heures du soir, elle se rend chez Mlle Irène pour louer une robe; elle s'arrête dans un bar rue Caumartin, où elle essaie d'appeler quelqu'un au téléphone jusqu'à minuit (probablement Jeanine au Roméo); elle y boit aussi trois grogs; à minuit, elle se rend au Roméo, où elle trouve Jeanine, qui lui parle du contenu de la lettre; elle traverse ensuite la ville en prenant le boulevard Haussmann, puis le faubourg Saint-Honoré, en direction des Champs-Elysées. Vers une heure du matin, elle est arrivée au Pickwick's-Bar, rue de l'Etoile. Un peu avant deux heures, elle est attaquée par le complice d'Albert, qui dépose son corps place Vintimille, où on le découvre vers trois heures du matin...

Murielle Wenger

English translation

 

Home  Bibliography  Reference  Forum  Plots  Texts  Simenon  Gallery  Shopping  Film  Links