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The Maigret Stories

By Edward L. Galligan


Georges Simenon, Lakeville, Connecticut, 1953.
With a few of his books.
Collections Fonds Simenon
"The Maigret stories reveal the fundamental qualities of Simenon's mind; nearly all of them are, in a sense, fables demonstrating the ways of the creative, or intuitive, intelligence. They most definitely are not mere mystery stories. They are free of the gimmicks and clichés which make most mystery stories tedious to all but the addicts of the genre. Much more concerned with the why's of murder than with the who's, the Maigrets are perceptive about the realities of human behavior. And, like all of his work, they are written in a beautifully spare, unpretentious style....

"This effort to understand, to leave the world of abstractions for the world of the concrete, is characteristic of the Maigrets and of all of Simenon's works. This is what makes the Maigrets so vastly more satisfying than most books in the mystery story genre."

Edward L. Galligan
The South Atlantic Quarterly

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