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MAIGEN - Maigret Encyclopedia

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Pacaud, Marcel-Joseph-Étienne. see: Marcellin

Pacific. The chief engineer said they'd just got word of the Pacific, of the same class as the Océan. It had struck a rock and sunk. The second officer's wife had come in from Rouen. [1931-REN]

M went on board the Ardena and asked if they had known William Brown. The Swedes said they thought he'd owned the Pacific, but it had changed hands two or three times since. [1932-LIB]

Pacific. Berthe Swaan said Olaf Swaan didn't want to go to the Pacific, where there were more opportunities. Came to Fécamp originally to buy a schooner. [1929-30-LET]

M got a letter from Padailhan, the Inspector of Taxes at Nevers. Ten years in Indo-China. There he knew Émile Gallet. Had arranged a mock marriage with a Malay girl. The idea came from the tax inspector, who'd read a book of Stevenson's about natives in the Pacific, with a similar fake marriage, to get a wild native girl. [1930-GAL]

Prosper Donge saw a picture of Mimi Clark in a magazine with his son, "just returned from a cruise in the Pacific." [1939-MAJ]

Padailhan. M got a letter from M. Padailhan, the Inspector of Taxes at Nevers. Home 17, Rue Creuse. Told M to say he was his cousin from Beaucaire if anyone met him. Ten years in Indo-China. No great boulevards in Saigon then. There he knew Émile Gallet. Said he was crazy about football and women. Had arranged a mock marriage with a Malay girl. The idea came from the tax inspector, who'd read a book of Stevenson's about natives in the Pacific, with a similar fake marriage, to get a wild native girl. [1930-GAL]

Page. Judge Page's office, one of those not yet modernized, was on the top floor of the Law Courts. [1968-ENF]

Page, Jacqueline. For more than a year Jacques Fleury had been seen with Jacqueline Page, 23, sometimes worked as a movie extra. They lived together in an apartment on Rue Washington above an Italian grocers. Mother looked after pews in the church at Picpus. [1954-MIN]

Page, Léontine. Léontine Page had been Robert de Courçon's housekeeper for 15 years. [1953-PEU]

pages, yearly Maigret. see Number of Maigret pages written by year

Paget, Éliane. Émile Grosbois' niece. Henri Paget was 20, his sister, Éliane Paget, 18. [1942-men]

Paget, Françoise. Françoise Paget, the elder sister of Émile Grosbois and his brother, Oscar Grosbois, had been married to a man named Paget, who had died. The business was named for him, Grosbois et Paget. [1942-men]

Paget, Henri. Émile Grosbois' nephew. Henri Paget was 20, his sister, Éliane Paget, 18. [1942-men]

Pagliati, Gino. Gino Pagliati came to Dr Pardon's to say he'd found a wounded man on the Rue Popincourt, a hundred yards away. A Neapolitan, he had a small grocery store on the corner of Rue du Chemin-Vert and the Rue Popincourt. Pardon had treated him for high blood pressure. Short, stockily built, heavy, ruddy complexion. [1969-TUE]

Pagliati, Lucia. Gino Pagliati's wife Lucia ran the grocery shop while he made noodles, ravioli, tortellini. [1969-TUE]

Paillet, Adeline. Hubert Vernoux had a daughter, Adeline, who married a man named Paillet, whom she met while on holiday at Royan. Most of the time they lived in Paris. [1953-PEU]

Paimpol. [village, NW France, Côtes-du-Nord dept. pop. 1962: 8,044. NNW of Saint-Brieuc on the Gulf of Saint-Malo.]

Julie Legrand's brother was on the Saint-Michel of Paimpol. [1932-POR]

Paix, Rue de la. [Paris. 2e, Bourse. from Rue des Capucines to Place de l'Opéra]

Rue de la Paix, Place Vendôme, Rue du Faubourg-Saint-Honoré... Pietr strolled on. [1929-30-LET]

Marchand said a girl [Francine Latour] who's been getting her dresses in the Rue de la Paix for the past four or five months doesn't get tired of visiting race courses. [1947-MOR]

Richard Gendreau-Balthazar had no interest in spending his time chasing street-walkers in the Rue de la Paix. [1948-PRE]

Mme M said there was no point looking in the Rue de la Paix, Rue Saint-Honoré or Avenue Matignon, since they'd have been too expensive and didn't show hats in their windows. [1949-MME]

M said in those days he looked for luxury, not in the shopwindows of the Rue de la Paix, but on pork butchers' counters. [1950-MEM]

The jewels in Éveline Jave's jewel case, about 30 million francs worth, came from the best shops in the Rue de la Paix. [1956-AMU]

Only on a couple of occasions had the jewel thieves chosen the big jewelers, on Place Vendôme and Rue de la Paix, who had alarm systems. [1965-PAT]

Palace. [Brussels] Albert Falconi said he told him the best hotel was the Palace, opposite the Gare du Nord. [1954-JEU]

Palace-Coiffure. Joseph Leroy worked at the Palace-Coiffure. [1945-pip]

Palace Hotel. M stopped at the Palace Hotel in Brussels, where Jehan d'Oulmont and his mistress had taken a room. [1936-pei]

Palace Hôtel. Raoul Sauget was Angèle Sauget's husband, much older than she, a night porter at the Palace Hôtel on the Avenue des Champs-Élysées. [1963-FAN]

Palais, Boulevard du. They crossed the little bridge behind Notre-Dame and stopped at a bar on the corner of the Boulevard du Palais. [1969-TUE]

Palais, Boulevard du. [Paris. 1er, Louvre - 4e, Hotel-de-Ville. from Quai de l'Horloge to Quai des Orfèvres]

M called Lucas from City Police Headquarters, to save time crossing the Boulevard du Palais. [1952-BAN]

M received a call from Emergency Calls in the Boulevard du Palais. A hold-up in the Rue La Fayette, between the Rue Taitbout and the Rue de la Chaussée d'Antin. Shots fired, casualties... A bar in the Boulevard du Palais was just opening, and M had hot croissants and two or three cups of coffee. [1961-PAR]

Gilbert Pigou had written M a letter from a café on the Boulevard du Palais. [1969-VIN]

M had taken a few steps towards the Boulevard du Palais, when Léontine Antoine came up to him. He decided against stopping at the Brasserie Dauphine and was on his way home. M said he was going towards Pont Saint-Michel and they walked together. [1970-FOL]

M had found a summons from the Chief of Police on his arrival at the Police Judiciaire, and as he went to the Boulevard du Palais, he wondered what it meant. (Rue du Palais in Hamilton)... M asked the driver to stop at the corner of the Quai des Orfèvres and the Boulevard du Palais (Rue du Palais in Hamilton). [1972-CHA]

Palais Bourbon. Auguste Point said he avoided certain journalists and unsavory businessmen who haunted the corridors of the Palais Bourbon. [1954-MIN]

Palais de Justice. M and Torrence set out following a maze of corridors and staircases, up to the attics of the Palais de Justice, where the Judicial Identification Laboratory was located. [1929-30-LET]

M called the Police Records Office in Paris, spoke to Benoît. He was up in the attics at the Palais de Justice, and had found the files for Jean Liberge's fingerprints. [1930-PRO]

The photographers from the Technical Branch, who worked in the basement of the Palais de Justice, said no interesting fingerprints had been found. [1931-OMB]

Duhourceau lived on the other side of the Palais de Justice in Bergerac, in a square as big as the Place du Marché . [1932-FOU]

Just as they past the Palais de Justice, M said "I dont' think anything", one of his favorite expressions. [1934-MAI]

On the top floor of the Palais de Justice, two men in gray overalls were painstakingly checking fingerprints. [1937-38-amo]

[Caen] M was sitting on the end of a hard bench in the dusty corridor of the Palais de Justice. It was ten in the morning. [1937-38-bay]

M, in a bistro near the Palais de Justice, refused M. Louis's invitation to come and spend a few days in Cannes.... The man's fingerprints, sent to Paris by tele-photo [bélino], did not appear in the files at the Palais de Justice. [1938-owe]

Oswald Clark went to the Avenue Friedland to see a lawyer, finally to the Palais de Justice to see the Examining Magistrate, Bonneau.... They had to go around the Palais de Justice to get to the Quai de l'Horloge. M went into the Central Police Station to get Prosper Donge. [1939-MAJ]

M went to the Palais de Justice at Versailles and had himself announced. [1940-JUG]

The glass door which provided direct access between the Police Judiciaire headquarters and the Palais de Justice and the Archives. On the right a staircase leading to the attics which housed Police Records and the Forensic Laboratory. [1940-CEC]

Berthe Janiveau, Joseph Mascouvin's foster sister, was a stenographer at a travel agency Boulevard de la Madeleine, but took the métro another four stops that morning to Châtelet, to see M in the Palais de Justice. [1941-SIG]

M passed through the small door which led from Police Headquarters to the Palais de Justice. M had never been able to endure Judge Coméliau. "Let's go and see the old monkey," he sighed. [1947-MOR]

M made his way, via a permanently deserted staircase, to the top floor, where the laboratories and records were located. [1949-MME]

Jacquemain walked with him to the Palais de Justice, the Police Judiciaire, and that night, walking up and down the Seine, talked about his job as a police inspector. [1950-MEM]

M went over to see Moers at the Technical Branch, under the overheated roof of the Palais de Justice, to arrange for Guillaume Serre's car to be checked out. [1951-GRA]

M went to have a drink in the Palais de Justice bar after testifying in the Lecoeur case. [1952-BAN]

M stopped at a small bar opposite the Palais de Justice for a white wine. [1955-COR]

On the steps of the Palais de Justice a woman was forcing her skirt down against the wind. [1956-ECH]

M reached the Quai des Grands-Augustins, right opposite the Palais de Justice, and hesitated a second before entering a little Norman bar, slightly below street level. The bar-owner with carbuncled cheeks had known him for years. [1956-AMU]

The deputy from the Public Prosecutor's said he was going back to the Palais de Justice, but Angelot said he'd prefer to stay... M had a key to the glass-panelled door leading from Police Headquarters into the Palais de Justice, kept locked since a prisoner had made a getaway through it. [1958-TEM]

In the attics of the Palais de Justice, among the Judicial Identity experts, M found his old friend Moers.... M and his colleague Buffet moved from one world to another by going through the inconspicuous dorr that divided the Palais de Justice from the offices of the Judicial Police. [1961-PAR]

M circled the Palais de Justice, passed under the big clock, and crossed the Pont-au-Change. A few minutes later he was waiting for his bus in Place du Châtelet. [1962-CLI]

As they reached the Quai des Célestins, Parrain, the Deputy Public Prosecutor, and Dantziger, the Examining Magistrate, arrived from the Palais de Justice at the same time by car. [1962-CLO]

Jean-Charles Gaillard usually got back from the Palais de Justice a little after 6:00. [1962-COL]

It was not until M was crossing the Pont-au-Change, and was in sight of the Palais de Justice, that he realized why he was uneasy.... The Criminal Investigation Department now had the own ballistics expert, up in the Forensic Laboratory in the attic of the Palais de Justice. [1963-FAN]

Magistrate Ancelin said it was too bad his worked kept him locked up in the Palais de Justice. [1965-PAT]

M walked slowly to the Examining Magistrate's offices in the Palais de Justice. Cayotte's room was straight out of a 19th century novel. [1966-NAH]

Judge Cassure's chambers were in a part of the Palais de Justice that had not yet been modernized. [1971-SEU]

M told Line Marcia he'd take them to the Central Police Station [Dépôt] first, in the basement of the Law Courts [Palais de Justice]. [1971-IND]

Palais de Justice [*Fontenay-le-Comte*]. Julien Chabot told M he'd be at the Palais de Justice in the morning, that it was on the Rue Rabelais, a little furthe up than Hubert Vernoux's house. [1953-PEU]

Palais de la Mediterranée. M read the paper. "Daughter of Mohammedan Ruler married at Nice. festivities in India and Afghanistan... A dinner in Nice at the Palais de la Mediterranée..." A Moslem princess marrying at Nice... [1932-LIB]

Palais d'Orsay. Auguste Point went to a banquet at the Palais d'Orsay the night he received the Calame report. [1954-MIN]

Palais-Royal. Half an hour later they were on the other side of the river by the Palais-Royal. [1930-31-TET]

At his hotel M booked seats for the Palais-Royal: he'd go to the theater with his sister-in-law. [1934-MAI]

The dead man had sold pornographic postcards near the Tuileries and Palais-Royal. [1950-MEM]

Fouad Ouéni said Félix Nahour had seen his wife and Vicente Alvaredo coming out of a restaurant in the Palais-Royal. [1966-NAH]

Palais-Royal, Place. [Paris. 1er, Louvre. from Rue de Rivoli to Rue Saint-Honoré]

Loraine Martin had worked for M. Lorilleux in the Palais-Royal, in a shop which sold souvineers and old coins. [1950-noe]

Jacques Sainval said he'd taken Paulette Lachaume to Chez Marcel, in the Palais-Royal, where they had a table on the entresol. [1958-TEM]

Palavas. Léon Florentin had said he had a plan for developing the coastline between Le Grau-du-Roi and Palavas as a luxury seaside resort. [1968-ENF]

Palestri, Federigo. Mirella Jonker got on the phone and told M the artist Federigo Palestri had been taken to the frunished apartment of Mario de Lucia, 27B Rue de Berri. [1963-FAN]

Palestrino, Pepito. Philippe Lauer said the day before an arrest warrant had been issued for Pepito Palestrino, proprietor of the Floria, 53 Rue Fontaine - next to the eyeglass shop. M said in his day it was called the Toreador. [1934-MAI]

Palladium. Ronald Dexter's friend Germain knew all about show business history, who was related to the anchor man killed in the pyramid act at the Palladium in 1905 or anything. [1946-NEW]

Palloc. Mme. Palloc, who had lived opposite Joséphine Ménard, found her body in her room, her skill cracked, face battered. [1969-VIN]

Palmari, Manuel. Near 60.... Three times that week M had been to Manuel Palmarimi's, the old owner of the Clou Doré on Rue Fontaine, who lived in his bourgeois apartment on the Rue des Acacias with his mistress, Aline. Had reigned for 30 years in Montmartre, where he'd started as a pimp…. The building was unobtrusive, comfortable, with a large, silent elevator. Fourth floor, door at the left. Manuel's hair was white. He didn't smoke or drink…. Three years earlier, as he was opening the door of his club, he'd received half a dozen machine gun bullets in his thigh and stomach. He'd gotten himself transferred to one of the best private clinics in Neuilly. [1964-DEF]

The jewel robberies that would become known as "M's longest investigation" were going to come to an end. It might be said that it started 20 years earlier, when he took an interest in Manuel Palmari, a vagrant from Corsica who had started humbly as a pimp... Was near sixty, bound to his wheelchair since he'd been hit by machine gun bullets and lost his leg one day as he lowered the blinds at the Clou Doré. [1965-PAT]

Palmes, Hôtel des. see: Hôtel des Palmes

Palmieri. [In original, Countess Louise Palmieri. In translation, Palverini] M said Palmieri, like the trees on the Promenade des Anglais, palmier, with an i. [1957-VOY]

Panama. M learned that a Panama was a boat with neither an engine nor horses on board, which hired a carter for a given distance. [1930-PRO]

Panama. Frédéric Michaux and Thérèse were planning to go away to Panama, South America, next spring. [1939-ven]

Méjat found a lable on the man's jacket. Panama. M said his clothes being made in the Republic of Panama was about as useful as it they'd been made in China. [1940-JUG]

Jos MacGill said the day before yesterday John Maura was in Panama, perhaps today in Rio or Venezuela. [1946-NEW]

Fred Alfonsi had gone to Panama on an Italian ship with 5 or 6 girls. [1950-PIC]

Julien Foucrier had lived in Spain, Portugal, and then Panama for fifteen, on the run for killing Mabille. [1951-MEU]

Five years later, a passenger-carrying cargo boat arrived at Cherbourg from Panama. A third-class passenger, who said he was Henri Sauer, was Victor Ricou. [1956-ECH]

Pan American. In Countess Louise Paverini's room were timetables from Air France and Pan American. [1957-VOY]

Panetti, Bella. Bella, the only daughter of Countess Panetti, had married Krynker without consent, at Monte Carlo, 5 years earlier, and the two families had never met.... Two years earlier the Krynkers had gotten a divorce in Switzerland, since divorce is impossible in Italy. The daughter married an American, with whom she lived in Texas. No reconcilliation with her mother. [1949-MME]

Panetti, Countess. Mme M discovered Countess Panetti had been the one who bought the hat at Hélène et Rossine's, and that she'd been staying at Claridge's.... The widow of Count Panetti, the munitions and heavy industry man in Italy. Lived all over - Paris, Cannes, Egypt, Vichy... Murdered by Schwartz. [1949-MME]

Panhard. Charles Besson arrived with his wife and four children in a big, old-fashioned Panhard. [Panhard Dyna-100 X-84 1945-50. The firm of Panhard and Levassor were the first in France to manufacture an internal combustion engine in 1876. The first horseless carriages (of Daimler design, built under licence) left their factory in 1891. The following year, a Panhard car was the first to journey from Paris to Versailles without any major mechanical problems, and then covered the 140 miles from Paris to Étretat at an average speed of 6 mph. It was Panhard who first established the architecture of the modern car with the engine at the front, followed by the clutch and then the gearbox.. In 1910, Panhard licenced a valveless engine from Knight and this design was used until 1939.] [1949-DAM]

The concierge said Véronique Lachaume had been having an affair with a man about 40, smartly dressed, who drove a Panhard convertible. [1958-TEM]

Panthéon. M wondered if like many foreigners the man [Stephan Strevzki] frequented Montparnasse, or the neighborhood of the Panthéon. [1939-hom]

Pantin. [commune, N France, Seine-Saint-Denis dept. pop. 1968: 47,607. NE suburb of Paris]

Dr Rivière's Serums had other buildings at Pantin. Only the labs were at Place des Vosges. [1931-OMB]

They'd built a Juva plant at Le Havre, then at Pantin, a Paris suburb. [1949-DAM]

The taxi driver that Lamballe had sent came from Pantin. [1949-MME]

Pape, Dieudonné. Middle-aged man, broad-shouldered, medium height, red hair, blue eyes, fair-skinned, high color, smallpox scars. Aline Calas' lover, lived in a 5-story building, 56, Rue des Écluses-Saint-Martin, 2nd floor, on the left; three rooms: bedroom, dining room, kitchen; large store-cupboard converted into a bathroom. Warehouseman with Zenith Transport, Rue des Récollets, Roulers and Langlois. Widower for years, his wife had died 3 or 4 years after the marriage. Sister lived in Nogent-sur-Marne, Nogent Phone 3-1-7, married to a builder. He said he'd gone to visit her on Sunday. Saw the sister, husband, children, neighbors. Caught the 8:00 bus home. The confessed murderer of Omer Calas. [1955-COR]

Papeterie Roman. Carried the Morvan Vellum paper the anonymous note had come on. At the top of the Rue du Faubourg-Saint-Honoré on the left. M had often stopped in front of the window.... The scraping knife used to kill Mlle. Antoinette Vague had come from the Papeterie Roman, like all the office supplies. [1968-HES]

Papet, Hector. Joséphine Papet's father was Hector Papet, deep-sea fisherman from Dieppe. [1968-ENF]

Papet, Josée. Léon Florentin's girlfriend was Joséphine Papet, who preferred to be called Josée, 34. [1968-ENF]

Papet, Joséphine. Léon Florentin's girlfriend was Joséphine Papet, who preferred to be called Josée, 34. [1968-ENF]

Papet, Léon. Joséphine Papet introduced Léon Florentin to François Paré as her brother, Léon Papet, an engineer. [1968-ENF]

Papet, Léontine. Joséphine Papet's mother was Léontine Papet, née Léontine Marchaud. [1968-ENF]

Papin. The concierge at Lognon's was Mme. Papin. M suggested to Mme M that she reach some arrangement to have her stay with Solange Lognon a few hours a day. [1963-FAN]

Paradis, Le. see: Le Paradis A year later Charles Dandurand acquired Le Paradis in Béziers for Juliette Boynet Boynet, one of the most profitable establishments of its kind in the country. She owned many houses of prostitution. [1940-CEC]

Paradis, Le. see: Le Paradis At 28 Fred Alfonsi was in Marseilles, supplying brothels. No convictions, but he got in trouble because of a 17-year-old girl he placed in Le Paradis of Béziers with false papers. [1950-PIC]

Paradis, Rue de. [Paris. 10e, Entrepôt. from Rue du Faubourg-Saint-Denis to Rue du Faubourg-Poissonière]

Angèle Louette's mother married a bank clerk who died young. She went to work for a business firm in the Rue Paradis. [1970-FOL]

Paradon. Arsène Vadibert said that at the maison (he pronounced it "maisong"), the Paradon (orig. Fr: Paradou), a girl named Adèle had run off to Paris, but they refused to pay her as she hadn't given proper notice. [1942-FEL]

Paradou. Arsène Vadibert said that at the maison (he pronounced it "maisong"), the Paradou (Eng tr: Paradon), a girl named Adèle had run off to Paris, but they refused to pay her as she hadn't given proper notice. [1942-FEL]

paraffin test. [The "paraffin test", also known as the "Dermal Nitrate" or "diphenylamine test," was the first test developed in an attempt to determine whether an individual had fired a firearm. It was introduced in the United States in 1933 by Teodoro Gonzalez of the criminal identification laboratory, Mexico City Police Headquarters. In this test, the hands were coated with a layer of paraffin. After cooling, the casts were removed and treated with a reagent used to detect nitrates and nitrites that originate from gunpowder. Although this test often – but not invariably – gave positive results on the hands of individuals who had fired weapons, it also sometimes gave positive results on the hands of persons who had not, and is not considered trustworthy. (adapted from Di Maio, "Gunshot Wounds", NY 1985)]
M told the laboratory to try the paraffin test on Jaquette Larrieu's right hand. It turned out positive! [1960-VIE]

Moers had the results of the paraffin test. It had shown positive for Roger Stieb, a Czechoslovak refugee who had worked for a long time in the same factory as Joseph Raison, on the Quai de Javel. [1961-PAR]

M had Moers come in and give a paraffin test to Aline. [1965-PAT]

M told Fouad Ouéni he'd have Moers bring over the equipment to give him a paraffin test, but Ouéni smiled and said he'd been practicing at a shooting range. [1966-NAH]

Paramount. M and Mme M went to the Paramount movie theater on the Boulevard des Italiens. They heard electric organs, saw the orchestra emerge from the bowels of the earth on a platform... [1949-MME]
 

Paray-le-Frésil. As a small boy at Paray-le-Frésil, M had felt sympathy for rabbits. [1956-AMU]

Parc aux Cerfs, Le. see: Le Parc aux Cerfs The nightclub Adrien Josset had visited at 1:30. Ninouche had been doing her strip act. He bought a whiskey for Marina, the hostess, and for himself. [1959-CON]

Parc Monceau. see: Monceau, Parc

Parc Montsouris. see: Montsouris, Parc

Parc-Montsouris, Avenue du. [Paris. 14e, Observatoire. at Rue Émile-Deutsch-de-la-Meurthe]

Lucas called that Superintendent Manicle of the 14th had a murder in a small private house in the Avenue du Parc-Montsouris, a Lebanese named Félix Nahour. The charwoman had found the body. [1966-NAH]

Pardon, Berthe. Mlle.Cécile Pardon and Gérard Pardon's younger sister. Salesgirl at the Galeries Lafayette. Concierge had seen her with a man about 30 one day. Gérard's sister, a plump little thing, pretty and well-groomed.... Lived at 22, Rue Ordener. Boyfriend was a married man. [1940-CEC]

Pardon, Cécile. 28, but an obvious spinster. Totally lacking in charm. Extreme pallor, slight cast in one eye, black dresses, absurd green hat.... Had sent a note to M that "something terrible happened last night" and was waiting for him in the waiting room when she disappeared. She first come about six months earlier, to report that she'd noticed things had been moved in her Aunt Juliette Boynet 's apartment during the nights.... her absurd green hat a little askew on top of her tightly screwed-back hair.... It was not until five o'clock that afternoon that M learned she was dead. [1940-CEC]

Pardon, Dr. see Dr. Pardon (Le Dr Pardon) by Murielle Wenger

Doctor, M's friend. For about a year, every month the M's had dined with the Pardons, or "at the Doc's" on Boulevard Voltaire, just before the square, only 5 minutes walk from M's house, narrow elevator. ... It was Jussieu, the head of the Forensic Laboratory, who had one evening taken the Inspector around to Dr. Pardon's. "You'll see, he's a man you'll like."... After being on the staff at Val-de-Grâce, an assistant of Lebraz, he spent five years on the staff of Sainte-Anne. Then became a GP, by choice, working 12-15 hours ago, without caring about whether his patients could pay. His passion was cooking. They called each other Maigret and Pardon, while the wives used the Christian names. Two couples were almost the same age. In the living room was a grand piano and embroidery work on all the furniture. A little man, rather stout, very large head, bulging eyes. Mme. Pardon was thin, with a very long nose. ... Jussieu had called M to see if he was going to dinner at Pardon's that evening. Didn't think Dr Paul could come: tête de veau en tortue. calf's head mock turtle, dish Dr Pardon discovered on a visit to Belgium. with a light Beaujolais.... M. called Pardon to pick him up at the Quai, to go to François Lagrange's. [1952-REV]

M called his friend Dr. Pardon, to see if he knew Étienne Gouin. [1953-TRO]

Lucien's wife kept a herb shop in the Rue du Chemin-Vert. M had often seen him and his wife standing in the doorway of the shop when he and his wife went past of their way to dine at Dr Pardon's. [1954-JEU]

M's friend, Dr. Pardon of Rue Popincourt, with whom he and his wife dined regularly once a month, had once asked him why plainclothes policemen, like plumbers, always go about in pairs. [1955-COR]

The traditional monthly visits with the Pardons still continued, so on the previous Friday M and Mme M had made their way to the Rue Picpus. [1955-TEN]

One evening M had gone to see his friend Pardon, the doctor in the Rue Picpus, at whose house they dined regularly once a month. M had had bronchitis and got up too soon, and had had to take to bed a second time, and for a while an attack of pleurisy was feared. Pardon had advised a holiday.... They had come to Joinville in the Pardon's car, and it was M who had chosen the restaurant, facing the Island of Love [Île d'Amour].... M called Pardon to ask if he knew who Dr J-- of Boulevard Haussmann was. Pardon said he'd check the Medical Register, and found it was Dr , Philippe Jave, probably 45, sound practitioner, good-looking. The other doctor was Gilbert Négrel, about 30, one of Professor Lebier's assistants. [1956-AMU]

M called Pardon to arrange to drop by and ask about the Xavier Marton visit. M made his leisurely way to the Rue Picpus where Pardon lived in an old block of flats without a lift. The maid, who knew him, did not take him through the waiting room, but along the corridor and in at the back door. M asked about Steiner. Pardon was just a family doctor, with just a smattering of neurology and psychiatry.... The day before, Pardon, his friend in the Rue Picpus, had called to tell M that Mme M had been in for a checkup. [1957-SCR]

Pardon, at 45, was nearly bald. This was the 44th rice pudding in the four years the M's had dined regularly once a month at the Pardons'. The maid placed the rice pudding on the table. The Pardons in turn came once a month to the M's. Five or six months after the visits had started, Mme. Pardon had made rice pudding, and M had three helpings, saying it reminded him of his childhood, and he hadn't had as good a one in 40 years. After that, every dinner at the Pardons' new apartment on Boulevard Voltaire had it. Daughter Alice had married a vetinary surgeon, Bruart a year ago, was seven months pregnant.... Although M and Pardon had met late in life, they had always been able to understand each other's half spoken utterances. [1959-CON]

M had discussed it with his friend Pardon, the local doctor with whom he and his wife had got into the habit of dining once a month. Once when his office had been full all day, Pardon had displayed a touch of discouragement, almost of bitterness. "28 patients in the afternoon alone!" [1959-ASS]

That evening, the Pardons, instead of asking them to their flat, as usual, had taken them to a little restaurant on the Boulevard du Montparnasse. [1960-VIE]

Only to his old friend Dr. Pardon, who lived in the Rue Popincourt, did he sometimes mutter something that might be considered confidential. [1961-PAR]

Mme M said that Francine Pardon had called. They come back from Italy on Monday. It was the first vacation the Pardons had taken by themselves in over 20 years. They had gone by car, intending to visit Florence, Rome and Naples, and to come back via Venice and Milan, stopping wherever they pleased. They'd invited the Maigrets to dinner next Wednesday. Traditionally it should have been on the first Wednesday of the month. She'd said the trip was exhausting, almost as much traffic on the roads as on the Champs-Élysées. Their daughter was fine, the baby gorgeous... She'd married the year before and had a baby a few months old. They'd decided to buy a small house, by the sea or in the country.... M thought the relationship between the René Josselin's and Dr. Larue were like the Maigrets and the Pardons. He wondered if they too had a set day. [1961-BRA]

M and Mme talked about Doctor Pardon's daughter, who was expecting her second child. [1962-CLI]

He'd suddenly felt an urge to go to the Brasserie Dauphine, and in spite of the advice of his friend Pardon, the Rue Picpus doctor, at whose home he and Mme M had dined the previous week, to treat himself to an apéritif.... Pardon had recommended him to watch his liver. [1962-COL]

It was in the Rue Popincourt, several hundred yards from the Boulevard Richard-Lenoir, at the Pardon's house, where M had for years been dining once a month. The doctor and his wife dined at the M's once a month too. Pardon offered M a cigar. M had only seen him smoke cigarettes. He was neither tall nor fat. His dark hair was turning gray and his face was lined. He was 49. He had last examined M about a year earlier.... Solange, Pardon's daughter,pregnant for the second time, was staying with her parents whileher husband, an engineer in the eastern district, was at acongress in Nice. Her first-born, a boy, was asleep in hiscrib. [1964-DEF]

M had often discussed with Dr. Pardon that people are basically afraid. [1965-PAT]

Pardon called M at 1:30 am. They'd left a little after 11:00, after their monthly dinner which had been a tasty shoulder of mutton. They'd been dining together once a month for almost ten years, and yet the men never thought of being on Christian name terms. At dinner they'd talked about his daughter and son-in-law, and the cruise they were going to make to the Balearic Islands next summer. It was Jan 14, and it had been 12 degrees below zero all day.... In the elevator M had noticed that Pardon's face was strained.... Pardon's maid came with the report that he had typed up. For her he was the guest who came to dinner every month. [1966-NAH]

M would have been interested in hearing Dr. Pardon's impression of François Ricain.... Alone again, M thought of phoning Dr. Pardon. He was no psychiatrist, nor a professional psychologist, but often his advice had reinforced M in his opinions.... Their monthly dinner was not due till the following week. [1966-VOL]

M's trip to Vichy had started because of an evening at Pardon's, when Mme. Pardon had served a canard au sang, one of M's favorites, which he hardly touched. He had even passed up the Armagnac. Pardon had insisted on an examination. [1967-VIC]

M had often argued about Article 64 with his old friend Pardon. [1968-HES]

For the first time since they'd started dining once a month at the Pardons, M would have an unpleasant memory of the evening on the Boulevard Voltaire. Mme. Pardon had made boeuf bourguignon as only she could... they'd talked about provincial cooking, potée lorraine, tripes à la mode de Caen, bouillabaisse... Pardon was tired. He said if he had a son he tell him not to become a doctor... Pardon sat at his desk smoking a cigarette. [1969-TUE]

Mme M suggested having Pardon look in on M for his cold. He hated bothering the doctor, especially when it was his old friend Pardon, who seldom managed to get through a meal without interruption.... M said that while Mme M always felt grog was the best cure for the flu Pardon didn't agree. She said it was time they had them over to dinner, as they hadn't seen them for a month. [1969-VIN]

M had just drunk a glass of Calvados, and stopped himself from having another. His friend. Pardon would have been displeased with him for even contemplating it. [1970-FOL]

M had promised Dr. Pardon to moderate his drinking, but went ahead and had a third draught beer. [1971-SEU]

It had been the Maigrets turn to have the Pardons in. There was an unspoken agreetment between them, consolidated over the years. Once a month Doctor Pardon and his wife had the Maigrets to dinner in their apartment on the Boulevard Voltaire. Two weeks later it would be the Boulevard Richard-Lenoir.... M ordered a pastis. Since his friend Pardon had warned him, he drank less, smoked less. [1971-IND]

M would have liked another pastis, but he remembered his friend Pardon's advice and decided against it. Nor was he supposed to eat the tripes à la mode de Cäen which were on the menu, but he did. [1972-CHA]

Pardon, Émilie. Juliette Boynet's sister, Cécile Pardon's mother. 48 at the time Juliette had met Joseph Boynet, who was rich. Married one of the supervisors in the store she worked in in Fontenay-le-Comte. [1940-CEC]

Pardon, Gérard. Juliette Boynet 's nephew, Cécile Pardon's brother, enlisted in the army, married, lived in Paris near the Bastille. Hardly ever visited, but had come the week before. Wife, Hélène Pardon, was pregnant.... Lived on Rue du Pas-de-la-Mule. Said he'd spent the afternoon at the Canon de la Bastille, waiting for a friend who knew of a job for him. [1940-CEC]

Pardon, Hélène. Gérard Pardon's wife. 23, face aged with the resignation of the poor. Lived in two rooms over a butcher shop on the Rue du Pas-de-la-Mule. [1940-CEC]

Pardon, Solange. Solange, Pardon's daughter, pregnant for the second time, was staying with her parents while her husband, an engineer in the eastern district, was at a congress in Nice. Her first-born, a boy, was asleep in his crib. [1964-DEF]

Paré, François. Léon Florentin said in addition to him Joséphine Papet had other friends, François Paré, Fernand Courcel, Victor Lamotte, and the young redhead [Jean-Luc Bodard]. Paré, in his early 50s, was head of a Department in the Ministry of Public Works, Inland Waterways. He lived in Versailles.... François Paré was 55. His eldest daughter was married to a shipowner in La Rochelle. The second was a schoolteacher at a lycée in Tunis. The youngest lived in Paris, also married, in the 16th. [1968-ENF]

Parendon. Mme. Émile Parendon's wife. About 40, elegant, very vivacious, extremely restless eyes. Murdered Antoinette Vague with a knife. [1968-HES]

Parendon, Bambi. Paulette Parendon, Émile Parendon's daughter. Called herself Bambi, her brother, Gus Parendon. 18, passed her baccalauréat and was taking classes in archaeology. Previous year had wanted to be a lab assistant. Not beautiful, but a pleasant face and well-porportioned figure, hair held back by a ribbon. "Do you think the moral standards of this district are the same as those of a small town town in the provinces or those of the 20th Arondissement?" Had just come home from the Sorbonne when she learned of Mlle. Antoinette Vague's murder. Brought M a bottle of six-year-old Saint-Émilion and a large glass. [1968-HES]

Parendon, Émile. Maître. 46. Lawyer on Avenue Marigny. The third customer for the Morvan Vellum paper. Had been using it for 15 years. Specialized in International Law, especially Maritime Law. Married one of the daughters of Gassin de Beaulieu. Small, frail, curiously light, blue eyes, thick glasses. Came from Berry. [1968-HES]

Parendon, Germain. Doctor. Émile Parendon's brother, specialist in infantile neurology. Wife a former actress. Broad and powerful like his father, and much taller. M had Janvier call him. He was in Nice, staying at the Negresco, where M spoke to him. [1968-HES]

Parendon, Gus. Jacques Parendon, Émile Parendon's son. Called Gus by his sister and others. 15. Third grade at the Lycée Racine. Interested in music and electronics. Electronics of Tomorrow magazine was delivered to him. [1968-HES]

Parendon, Jacques. see: Parendon, Gus

Parendon, Paulette. see: Parendon, Bambi

Parendon, Professor. Surgeon at Laënnec. Émile Parendon's father. Member of the Academy of Medicine, Academy of Ethical and Political Sciences, etc., etc. Came to Paris very young, short, stocky, looked like a bull. Retired, widower for thirty years, lived almost opposite his son in the Rue de Miromesnil. [1968-HES]

Paréo. The dead man was Joe Fazio, came from Marseilles four or five years ago. Was a barman in a sleazy bar called the Paréo. [1972-CHA]

Pari-Mutuel-Urbain. M told Coméliau he'd had all the PMU lessees questioned, the Pari-Mutuel-Urbain, the off-track betting shops.... M had Mme M phone the Pari-Mutuel to see if there had been any racing in the Paris area on Tuesday. He was asleep when she came back, but three hours later, he asked, as if it had only been a moment, "Well, is the line busy, or what?" There'd been a race at Vincennes. [1947-MOR]

Paris, Avenue de. M got off the train at Versailles, and strolled down Avenue de Paris. [1940-JUG]

Paris City Health Department. A truck from the Paris City Health Department came to disinfect François Ricain's apartment. Moers didn't have the necessary equipment. [1966-VOL]

Paris, Hôtel de. see: Hôtel de Paris

Parisien Libéré. One of the first newspapers to appear after the Liberation. The editor was quite a young man. M went to their offices to search the papers of 1945, 1946. Finally, he found, under August 17, 1946: Young woman found strangled on Boulevard Rochechouart. Nina Lassave, aged 22, was found strangled in the bedroom of her apartment... The inquiry is being conducted by Chief Superintendent Piedboeuf of the Criminal Police. Three days later the paper reported on Louis M. [Louis Mahossier], a housepainter, and Marcel V., cabinetmaker, both of whom had apparently been her lovers, and neither of whom could be proven to have been on the scene. Marcel Vivien had witnesses to prove he had been in a café on the Boulevard de la Chapelle at the time of the crime. [1971-SEU]

Paris map books. see Guilmin / Leconte Street Guides

Paris, M outside of. see Maigret - in France, outside Paris

Paris Observatory. M had gone into the phone booth to call the Paris Observatory for the latest weather forecast, and some other details. [1937-38-noy]

Paris-Orléans. M walked short journey along the quayside to the Hôtel d'Orsay with Canonge. Before the war, when the Gare d'Orsay was the terminus for all trains on the Paris-Orléans line, the restaurant had been open all night. [1955-COR]

Paris, Rue de. [Dieppe] Jeanne Fénard's body had been carried into a pharmacy on the corner of the Rue de Paris. [1937-38-man]

Paris Soir. Intran [Intransigeant], Liberté, Presse, Paris Soir... Names of the papers called out by M. Jacob at his stall on the corner of Rue Clignancourt and Boulevard Rochechouart. [1930-GAL]

Paris-Strip. Antonio Farano managed one of Émile Boulay's cabarets, the Paris-Strip, in the Rue de Berri. [1962-COL]

Parquet. The Parquet (Prosecutor's Office) had already arrived. [1938-ceu]

Justin Minard said it looked like the Parquet was there, a gentleman with a white beard, and a young clerk, the Public Prosecutor and his assistant perhaps? [1948-PRE]

M asked the desk for the Parquet, but she didn't understand, so he asked for the Public Prosecutor. [1957-VOY]

Bornique said the Parquet had been there very early. [1962-COL]

Parquet. Public Prosecutor's Office. M called the Parquet from Place des Vosges to report Raymond Couchet's murder. [1931-OMB]

The people in the Parquet, attorneys, deputies and examining magistrates, nearly all belonged to the middle, if not the upper strata, of the bourgeoisie. The was also a certain tendency in the Palais de Justice, to hypocrisy.... M told Lapointe to wait for "the gentlemen of the Parquet". [1957-SCR]

Parrain. As they reached the Quai des Célestins, Parrain, the Deputy Public Prosecutor, and Dantziger, the Examining Magistrate, arrived from the Palais de Justice at the same time by car. Tall, slender, fair-haired and distinguished looking, he offered M a cigarette from a gold case. [1962-CLO]

Parson, Jim. M said they'd met a reporter, Jim Parson, straw-colored hair, blood-shot eyes, dead drunk.... The newsman with the yellow teeth, Jim Parson, said to M, "Good day M. Mégrette" in French. [1946-NEW]

Pas-de-Calais. [dept, N France pop. 1968: 1,397,159.]

Dr. Nobel said that in the villages of Holland, Flanders and the Pas-de-Calais, many town halls had been destroyed or plundered, registers burned. [1965-PAT]

Pas-de-la-Mule, Rue du. [Paris. 3e, Temple. from Boulevard Beaumarchais to Place des Vosges]

A few minutes later M was in the tobacconist's shop at the corner of the Rue du Pas-de-la-Mule, where he made a series of phone calls. [1937-38-amo]

Gérard Pardon Pardon lived in two rooms over a butcher shop on the Rue du Pas-de-la-Mule. [1940-CEC]

Mme. Lorilleux ran a haberdashery shop in the Rue du Pas-de-la-Mule. [1950-noe]

Pasquier. Dr. Pasquier examined Arlette's body. [1950-PIC]

Deputy Prosecutor Pasquier from the Public Prosecutor's Office and and Examining Magistrate M did not know very well, Urbain de Chézaud, arrived at the Comte Armand de Saint-Hilaire's. [1960-VIE]

Pasquier, Lulu. Tony Pasquier 's wife, Lulu. [1965-PAT]

Pasquier, Rue. A little later, when M was on a case that necessitated visiting a special house in the Rue Pasquier, he recognized a young woman who turned her head away. It was Adèle Noirhomme. [1931-REN]

Pasquier, Tony. Tony Pasquier lived on the fifth floor left at Aline's. Second bartender at the Claridge, wife, two children, eight and seven. Spanish maid lived in the attic. [1965-PAT]

passementerie. M was on the point of taking a job at a firm that made passementerie, on the Rue des Victoires. [1950-MEM]

passport. Loriot kept the files in the passport office at Police Headquarters. [1964-DEF]

Passy. Alain Mazeron's wife lived at 23, Rue de la Pompe, Passy. [1960-VIE]

Passy. [Paris. 16e Arondissement.]

Mado Feinstein said when she'd been with James he'd rented a place in Passy. [1931-GUI]

Stephan Strevzki lived in a 12,000-franc flat in Passy, 17 Rue de la Pompe. [1939-hom]

M was surprised at Mme Lucille's to find himself in a little Louis XVI sitting room, such as in Passy or Auteuil. [1946-NEW]

Janvier had left a message that he could be reached at Passy 62-41. [1947-MOR]

There were perhaps 200 women like the Countess von Farnheim in Montmartre, and in a higher bracket, a few dozen in the expensive apartments of Auteuil and Passy. [1950-PIC]

When M reached the Cochin hospital in the Faubourg-Saint-Jacques, Étienne Gouin had already left with his assistant for the Saint-Joseph Clinic at Passy. [1953-TRO]

Louise Paverini had had an apartment in Passy. [1957-VOY]

Lapointe had spent two nights at Passy in the house of M. Ailevard, who'd gone to London for two weeks.... Paulette Lachaume's notary, who'd wound up her father's estate, was Léon Wurmster, Rue de Rivoli, not to be confused with Georges Wurmster, a notary at Passy. [1958-TEM]

The second time M had dealt with Honoré Cuendet was a big jewel robbery in the Rue de la Pompe, in Passy. [1961-PAR]

Baron reported that he'd checked the Madeleine Theater. The two seats had been occupied. Behind were the Demailles, Rue de la Pompe in Passy. He'd question them. [1961-BRA]

Paris. 16e Arondissement. A florist named Mahossier lived in Passy. [1971-SEU]

Pasteur. The sergeant from Lagny kept dropping names as you might say Jesus Christ or Pasteur, and Old Mother Hébart, or Hobart... (see: Hubart) [1949-MME]

Pasteur, Boulevard. [Paris. 15e, Grenele. from Rue de Sèvres to Boulevard de Vaugirard]

Grossot was a sculptor who'd once won the Prix de Rome. With two daughters and his wife, lived on the Boulevard Pasteur, where they manufactured toys. [1949-MME]

Arlette's aunt said she was staying with friends, near the Boulevard Pasteur. [1950-PIC]

Augste Pointe had an apartment at 27, Boulevard Pasteur, 4th floor on the left. M didn't take a taxi from home, as it was just as quick to go by Métro. [1954-MIN]

Pat Delteil. see: Delteil, Pat

Paterson. One of the aka's of Alfred Moss. [1949-MME]

Pathologist. The hearse from the Pathologist's Laboratory [Medico Legal-Institute] had just arrived. [1968-ENF]

Pathologist's Laboratory. M called the Pathologist's Laboratory from the Inspector's Room, asked Delaplanque for the results of Sophie Ricain's autopsy. [1966-VOL]

Patience. Grégoire Brau, known as Patience, also as the Canon, had been at his game for years without ever being caught in the act. [1958-TEM]

Patino. Vittorio Petrini said he was born in Patino, a small village south of Naples. [1972-CHA]

Pâtisserie Bigoreau. The Pâtisserie Bigoreau in the Avenue de Neuilly was an elegant cake shop. [1936-lun]

Pâtisserie Maurin. [Étretat] In the Place de la Mairie M read: Pâtisserie Maurin, formerly Maison Seuret. [1949-DAM]

Patou. Local Constable who had visited the scene of Nina Lassave 's murder with Police Superintendent Maillefer. [1971-SEU]

Pau. [commune, SW France, capital, Pyrénées-Atlantiques dept. pop. 1968: 74,005. on right bank of Gave de Pau 109 mi. S of Bordeaux.]

Lucas was at Pau, where he had relatives. Torrence, who'd recently bought a second-hand car, was touring Normandy and Brittany. [1956-AMU]

Paucot. Third floor right tenant at Cécile Pardon's building. spinster, piano teacher. [1940-CEC]

Paul. John Arnold looked at the photographs. "That's Paul of Yugoslavia; Nanette of Faubourg Saint-Germain; Jef Van Meulen, of the chemical products firm, bowling in one of the squares of Saint-Tropez. [1957-VOY]

Paul. Paul, the proprieter of the Arche de Noé and his wife slept on the floor above M in an attic. His wife, small, faded blonde hair, hard faced. [1949-AMI]

Paul Benoît. see: Benoît, Paul

Paul, Big. see: Big Paul

Paul Bourget. see: Bourget, Paul

Paul, Dr. see "Well, old partner?" ("Alors, vieux complice ?") by Murielle Wenger

Armand Barion said that since M had Dr Paul's report, he knew that Olga Boulanger's intestine had been riddled with tiny perforations. [1936-lun]

Dr Paul had said, in the case of Arthur Aerts, that he'd died betwenn 10 and 10:30. [1936-pen]

Dr Paul had extracted the bullet from Martino's body, a Browning 6 mm 35. [1936-pig]

Sprightly Dr. Paul, with the perky little beard, had dropped in to see how things were going. [1941-SIG]

Dr. Paul's report said that the shot that killed Maurice Tremblet really shouldn't have killed him, but it took an unlucky bounce off a rib. [1946-pau]

Dr. Paul, the police surgeon, had performed the post-mortem on Ernest Combarieu. [1946-obs]

M told Dambois to have the body photographed, then sent to the Forensic Institute to have Dr. Paul do a post-mortem. ... There'd been a gala performance at the Madeleine Theater that night, the 100th performance of some play. Dr. Paul, Parisian to the core, was sure to have been there. [1946-mal]

Dr Paul had also been sent for. The corpse was naked when he appeared, his beard neat and his eyes bright... Dr Paul never stopped smoking during an autopsy, and declared that tobacco was the best antiseptic. [1947-MOR]

A young doctor with a dark beard got out of the car, a Gladstone bag in hand. It was Dr Paul, already quite famous. [1948-PRE]

Moers had left a few minutes too soon, so they called Dr. Paul to come down to Lagny and look at Countess Panetti's body.... With his eternal cigarette in his mouth. [1949-MME]

When M got back to the QDO there was a call from the pathologist, Dr. Paul, handsomely bearded. [1950-PIC]

Jussieu called M to see if he was going to dinner at Dr Pardon's that evening. Didn't think Dr. Paul could come. Dr. Paul was older than M and Pardon. Rateau, the Examining Magistrate; the Public Prosecutor, and Paul, the police medical expert, all gathered at Forensic Laboratory to see André Delteil's body. [1952-REV]

Doctor Paul completed the examination of Louis Thouret's body. [1952-BAN]

Dr Paul had called and asked M to get in touch. He was at the La Pérouse restaurant. [1953-TRO]

The doctor said Dr Paul would have a better idea of when she [Louise Laboine] was killed after the post-mortem.... A cigarette was hanging from his lower lip, as always when he was about to start a post-mortem. [1954-JEU]

M called the Public Prosecutor's office from the dingy bar, spoke with a Deputy. Requested to have Dr. Paul examine the arm as soon as possible. In white overall and rubber gloves, smoked incessantly. During a single autopsy would smoke as many as two packs of Bleues Gauloises. [1955-COR]

Dr Paul, the official pathologist who'd carried out the post-mortems, had a lot to say about the knife. [1955-TEN]

M called the Medico-Legal Institute to speak with Dr Paul. He was busy, but the message was the bullet had come from an automatic. [1956-ECH]

The newspaper reported that Dr Paul was engaged in the post-mortem. [1956-AMU]

Dr Paul appeared, carrying his bag. "Well my old friend?" [1957-VOY]

When Xavier Marton's body was found, M asked them to send for Dr. Paul, photographers from the Criminal Records Office, etc. [1957-SCR]

Old Dr Paul came in shortly afterwards, out of breath but alert, with a well-fed look. [1958-TEM]

M had seen the house, but the men from the Public Prosecutor's Office had been there, and Dr. Paul, and the local Inspector, and 7 or 8 experts from Criminal Records. [1959-CON]

According to Dr Paul, the crime was not committed earlier than the evening of Feb 27, between 5 and 8 o'clock. [1959-ASS]

Dr Paul's successor, Dr. Tudelle arrived with Pasquier and Urbain de Chézaud. [1960-VIE]

Old Dr Paul, who had gone on making post mortems till he was 76, had died, and been succeeded by a man named Lamalle. [1961-PAR]

M called the medical expert who was Dr. Paul's young successor. [1965-PAT]

The medical expert, Collinet, had replaced Dr Paul, with whom M had worked for so many years. [1966-NAH]

Unfortunately the pathologist was no long Dr Paul, whose greatest pleasure in life had been to take him out to dinner and regale him with detailed accounts of his autopsies. [1968-ENF]

M called the medical examiner who'd succeeded his old friend Dr. Paul. [1969-TUE]

Had been Chief Forensic Officer at the time of Nina Lassave's murder. M had worked with him for many years, but he was now dead. He had been a great expert on food. [1971-SEU]

Dr Bourdet, the medical examiner who had replaced Dr Paul, got out of a taxi grumbling. [1971-IND]

Paulette Lachaume. see: Lachaume, Paulette

Paulette Zuber. see: Zuber, Paulette

Paul Fabre. see: Fabre, Paul

Pauline. Mlle. Polish. The third roomer at the Émile Chabot's was Mlle. Pauline, along with the Polish student and Bogdanowsky. [1931-GAI]

Paul Martin. see: Martin, Paul

Paulus, Émile. Émile Paulus, 19. Born in Limoges, his parents still lived there. He'd been living for four months at Mlle. Clément's boarding house in the Rue Lhomond.... M found Paulus under Mlle. Clément's bed.... Paulus had lived with the Jef Van Dammes for two months when he first came to Paris, and worked in the Boulevard Saint-Denis. Had had a room in a hotel in the Rue Rambuteau.... The Press called him the "gangster of the Rue Campagne-Première".... When he arrived in Paris eighteen months earlier, he'd been emplyed by a property dealer in the Boulevard Saint-Denis. His job had been to write out notices and send out circulars. Was fired after a year for taking money from petty cash. Started selling encyclopedias door-to-door, since he couldn't live on what his parents sent him. [1951-MEU]

Paul Vinchon. See: Vinchon, Paul [1936-arr]

Paumelle. Paumelle was the landlord at the Vieux Calvados. [1948-PRE]

Paumelle, Louis. There was an inn at Saint-André-sur-Mer, the Bon Coin, run by Louis Paumelle. Joseph Gastin said the food was good but the rooms had no running water.... Although he was an innkeeper, Louis Paumelle looked more like a peasant in his own farm. [1953-ECO]

Paverini, Louise. The little Countess Louise Paverini [Palmieri in original] was stretched out on her bed, her eyes half closed.... Shortly before 2:00 am the Countess Louise Paverini and Colonel David Ward had got out of a taxi in front of the Hôtel George-V, and gone up together. [1957-VOY]

Paverini, Marco. Louise La Serte [Louise Paverini] had met Count Marco Paverini and fallen in love with him. [1957-VOY]

Pavillon Bleu. By one in the morning the Pavillon Bleu and other restaurants and cafés [in Saint-Cloud] shut their doors. [1930-31-TET]

Pavillon de Flore. M took a taxi to the Pavillon de Flore to get a list of the winners of the National Lottery. Seven years earlier Maurice Tremblet had won 3 million francs.. [1946-pau]

Pavillon Sévigné. [Vichy] If the murderer wasn't at one of the two fanciest hotels, he was probably at the Pavillon Sévigné, near the Pont de Bellerive. [1967-VIC]

Payne, Dorothy. David Ward's first wife was Dorothy Payne, whose family owned an important textile mill in Manchester. [1957-VOY]

PA  PE  PH  PI  PJ  PL  PM  PN  PO  PR  PS  PT  PU  PY  

PE

PEA  PEC  PED  PEE  PEG  PEK  PEL  PEN  PEP  PER  PES  PET  PEU  PEY  

Pearson. An English girl checked the list... Pearson... Louise Paverini - the Countess had been on the plane. [1957-VOY]

Pecq, Le. see: Le Pecq A fish dealer from Honfleur driving along Route 13 in the Forêt de Saint-Germain between Poissy and Le Pecq picked up Lognon, unconscious on the side of the road. Took him to Dr. Grenier's at Saint-Germain. [1951-LOG]

Pecqueur. The newsman who met Martin Duché at the station at Fontenay and told him of Adrien Josset's wife's murder. Baby face, plump cheeks, protruding eyes, red hair, smoked a pipe. [1959-CON]

Pedro. Rondonnet remembered that the previous April, on the Rue Blanche, Pedro, tall, thin, very pale, with a white streak in his black hair, the proprietor of the Chamois, a nightclub like the Pélican but sleazier, was killed. Five men had pulled up in a car. They'd caught four of the men, including the Fly [Monte-en-l'air], who'd fled to the roof. But Albert Babeau, the Musician, the one they call Midget because he wore platform shoes, escaped. He was arrested at Le Havre about a week later on an anonymous tip. [1942-FEL]

Norris Jonker said he'd let a painter named Pedro use his studio. M asked if he was Italian, Spanish... Jonker said he'd never asked. 22 or 23, he said. [1963-FAN]

Peeters, Anna. When M got out of the train at Givet, the first person he saw was Anna Peeters. [1932-FLA]

Peeters, Jean. Alfred Moss used the name Jean Peeters at the Grossots. Told them he represented a big English mill.... Alfred Moss had been living at the Grossot's under the name of Peeters for the past few months. [1949-MME]

Peeters, Joseph. The Peeters kept a shop on the Belgian frontier. Father, mother, three children. Anna Peeters worked in the shop. Maria Peeters was a teacher, Joseph Peeters a law student at Nancy. [1932-FLA]

Peeters, Maria. The Peeters kept a shop on the Belgian frontier. Father, mother, three children. Anna Peeters worked in the shop. Maria Peeters was a teacher, 28, Joseph Peeters a law student at Nancy. [1932-FLA]

Pégasse, Louise. The girl M. Louis was with in the Clou Doré was Louise Pégasse, nicknamed Lulu the Torpedo . [Lulu la Torpille], the name she appeared under in a striptease club, the Boule Verte on Rue Pigalle. [1965-PAT]

Peg Leg. see: Lapie, Jules

Peg Leg. see: Gilson, Arthur

Pekingese. M had just caught the Riviera Express for Cannes, at 4:17, seated opposite a woman with a horrible Pekingese on her lap. [1939-MAJ]

Pélardeau, Louis. Staying at the Hôtel des Ambassadeurs, room 105. Industrialist, lived on Boulevard Suchet in Paris. Friend of the proprieter of the hotel, who also owned one in La Baule. The man who murdered Hélène Lange, thinking she was hiding his son from him. [1967-VIC]

Pelcau. The mother of Albert Retailleau, the boy who was killed, was a Pelcau, a good family. [1943-CAD]

Peletier, Rue, Le. see: Le Peletier, Rue Marinette Augier's brother, François Augier, married, lived in Vanves. Worked for an insurance company, Fraternal Assurance, office in Rue Le Peletier. [1963-FAN]

Pelgrad. American doctor called by Mrs. Mortimer-Levingston in Berlin. [1929-30-LET]

Pelican. The Pelican, Liège café where Jean Chabot and René Delfosse agreed to meet the next day, after seeing the Greek's body in the Gai-Moulin. ... Jean and Delfosse went to the Pelican, sat at a table near the door and ordered English beer. [1931-GAI]

Pélican. The driver of the blue taxi said he'd taken Janvier and Johann Radek to the Pélican, Rue des Écoles. [1930-31-TET]

M said that Germain Cageot owned the Pélican and the Boule Verte, and probably one in Nice as well. [1934-MAI]

M went to the Rue Fontaine, to the Pélican, in Montmartre. [1939-MAJ]

The Commissioner asked Cassieux if there were any fresh developments in the Pélican case. Said he was having the proprieter in at 10, and he'd be bound to talk and the Commissioner warned him to go easy, that he had an influential friend in Parliament. [1940-CEC]

Janvier had been to the Pélican, [Jacques Pétillon was a saxophone player in a nightclub on Rue Pigalle] but Pétillon hadn't been there all night. He hadn't gotten in till 6:00 am, exhausted.... Outside the Pélican, with its blue neon sign and black doorman M found Janvier. [1942-FEL]

Albert Rochain had reached Boxer Jo at Le Pélican, Avenue de Wagram. [1947-MOR]

pelmet. M saw that a large letter "L" was embroidered in silver on the pelmet. [a short valence or small cornice for concealing curtain fixtures.] [1967-VIC]

Penal Code. Article 368 of the Penal Code. Mme. Antoinette Le Cloaguen quoted to M the penalty she might face. [1941-SIG]

A few weeks before he'd spoken bitterly on the Penal Code - the real job of the police was to protect the State... last of all the lives of the citizens. Article 274, on mendicancy comes before Article 295 on wilful homicide. [1961-PAR]

Penette, Anne-Marie. The past season Joseph Daumale was in La Bourboule, where he'd built a villa. Married to Anne-Marie Penette, of Les Sables-d'Olonne. three children. [1946-NEW]

Penguin Bar. Sergeant Ward said he took Bessie Mitchell to the Penguin Bar where his friends, four other Air Force men, were waiting: Sergeant Dan Mullins, Corporal Jimmy Van Fleet, Sergeant Ted O'Neil, and Corporal Wo Lee. Wo Lee was a Chinese who looked barely 16. [1949-CHE]

Pénicaud. An embarrassed Examining Magistrate called M to say Pénicaud was claiming his confession had be given under duress. [1940-CEC]

Pension des Palmiers. Évelina Nahour's children, the girl 5, boy 2, lived in Mougins, Pension des Palmiers. The boy was born in Cannes. [1966-NAH]

Pension Germain. Where Éléonore Boursang was staying in Sancerre. [1930-GAL]

Pension Otard. The policeman recognized Jeanne Fénard as the maid from the Pension Otard. [1937-38-man]

Pépère. Known as Pépère or Old Jules, a well-built man with white hair and a fresh complexion, one of Léonard Planchon's employees. Said he was sometimes called St. Peter.... Old Jules, the one with the white hair they called Pépère, worked for Planchon and had worked for his boss. [1962-CLI]

Pepito. Almost opposite Marina's was a small bar kept by an Auvergnat, and he saw two men, the Niçois and Pepito, who are usually not seen about so early. [1936-pig]

Pepito Giovanni. see: Giovanni, Pepito

Pepito Moretto. see: Moretto, Pepito

Pepito Palestrino. see: Palestrino, Pepito

Pera Palace. At Instanbul Germaine Laboine met a man called Julius Van Cram, a Dutchman apparently, staying at the Pera Palace. [1954-JEU]

Pereire, Boulevard. [Paris. 17e, Batignolles-Monceau. from Rue de Saussure to Avenue de la Grande-Armée]

Jean-Loup Pernelle said the bill of sale for the Clou Doré had been drawn up by Maître Desgrières, of the Boulevard Pereire. [1965-PAT]

Père Lachaise. [cemetery in E section of Paris]

The concierge only knew that Gaston Meurant was a picture-framer, and that he lived near Père Lachaise. [1959-ASS]

Émile Boulay's body had been found in the Rue des Rondeaux, in the 20th, just outside the cemetery of Père Lachaise. [1962-COL]

Père-Lachaise. [cemetery in E section of Paris]

Raymond Couchet used to joke with Nine Moinard about "a cozy little corner in the Père-Lachaise. [1931-OMB]

The misery of the poor quarters of Paris, of the little bistros around the Porte d'Italie or Saint-Ouen, the filthy wretchedness of the Zone and the more decent wretchedness of Montmartre or Père-Lachaise were all familiar to him. The bottom-line misery of the piers, too, of Place Maubert or the Salvation Army. [1949-CHE]

M went by taxi to the Rue Gay-Lussac, to see Maître Orin; the tall trees in the Luxembourg Gardens swayed in the breeze. Probably the oldest lawyer in Paris. Said everyone probably thought he'd been laid to rest in Père-Lachaise long ago. [1951-GRA]

Père Nicolas. see: Nicolas, Père

Peretti. M took the photos to Peretti's office. Peretti was the head of the Vice Squad, the only police inspector to wear a diamond ring, as though something of the underworld had rubbed off on him. A good-looking man with jet-black hair, he was still young, dressed in a flashy way. [1972-CHA]

Pérignon. Mme. Keller said she'd met a former governor of Gabon, Pérignon, who said François Keller had, in effect, been expelled from Gabon. [1962-CLO]

Perigueux. [commune, SWC France, capital, Dordogne dept. pop. 1968: 37,450. 66 mi. ENE of Bordeaux.]

Mme M said the Moulin-Neuf farm had no mill, was said to be 200 journaux - she didn't know what a journal was - the woods begin beyond the house, and then the road to Perigueux. [1932-FOU]

Perkins. The current owners of Judge Forlacroix's house in Versailles were Angela Dodds and Mrs. Perkins. The doorman was Jean. The house was littered with African and Chinese artifacts, all the bric-à-brac of Montparnasse bohemians.... a pair of English eccentrics. [1940-JUG]

Perkins, John. The couple in the Hôtel de Bretagne had registered under the name of Mr. & Mrs. John Perkins of Montreal. [1951-LOG]

Pernelle, Jean-Loup. Tony Pasquier said he'd known the head waiter at Clou Doré, Jean-Loup Pernelle, who'd worked at the Claridge .... The manager of the Clou Doré, Jean-Loup Pernelle, was also the head waiter. Born in Allier, he'd started as a waiter in Vichy. Married young, father of a family. His son was at the Medical College, and one of his daughters was married to a restaurant owner in the Champs-Élysées . He had built himself a house in Choisy-le-Roi . Said he'd bought the restaurant five days earlier from Aline. [1965-PAT]

Pernelle, Rue. [Paris. 4e, Hotel-de-Ville. from Rue Saint-Bon to Boulevard de Sébastopol]

Before her marriage Loraine Martin lived in the Rue Pernelle, off the Boulevard Sébastopol, the first on the right coming from the Rue de Rivoli toward the boulevards. 4th or 5th house on the left was a lodging house; Paul Martin remembered that some girls from the Châtelet theatre lived there. [1950-noe]

Peronnet. Inspector Peronnet brought Jean Chabot to the Sûreté . [1931-GAI]

Pérouse, La. see: La Pérouse Dr Paul had called and asked M to get in touch. He was at the La Pérouse restaurant. [1953-TRO]

Perpignan. [city, S France, capital, Pyrénées-Orientales dept. pop. 1968: 102,191. near Mediterranean 96 mi. S of Toulouse.]

Mina Claes thought she'd gone as far as Perpignan with Jef Claes, and had seen the Mediterranean. M asked if they'd tried to go to Spain, to get to the US, but she'd been 4, didn't know. [1965-PAT]

Perrée, Rue. [Paris. 3e, Temple. from Rue de Picardie to Rue du Temple]

François Mélan's car drew up to the Police Station of the 3rd Arrondissement on Rue Perrée, M got out first. [1964-DEF]

Perret, Alice. Félix Jubert said that Alice Perret might be more brilliant than Louise Léonard. Alice was the one who sang, and had come with Louis, whose parents were rich. He thought they'd get engaged. [1950-MEM]

Perrette. M recognized Lourceau, Perrette and other regular customers of the Brasserie du Remblai. [1947-VAC]

Perrin, Alice. David Ward's second wife, Alice Perrin, was the daughter of a school teacher in Nièvre, and had been working as a fashion model when Ward met her. [1957-VOY]

Perrin, Cécile. The 4-year-old child, Cécile Perrin's body was on a Louis XV sofa, smothered to death. [1959-ASS]

Perrin, Juliette. M noticed Juliette Perrin, Cécile Perrin's mother, a nightclub entertainer, in the front row of the court, since she was claiming damages. Her hair was dyed red and she was wearing a fur coat. [1959-ASS]

Persia. Ronald Dexter had found a handbill for J & J, that they had performed before crowned heads of Europe and the Shah of Persia. [1946-NEW]

Persian. The carpet in Liesbeth Popinga's room was a fine one. [1931-HOL]

In the middle of Valentine Besson's bed, a blue Persian cat was napping. [1949-DAM]

Persian. It would be as if someone were to tear the Persian carpet with its incredible blue tints. [1937-38-not]

Peruvian. A Peruvian couple lived in the second floor apartment at the Émile Parendon's. Left the house at 8:30, came down in the elevator. Came back at 3:00 am. They'd had supper at Maxim's, after a big movie opening on the Champs-Élysées. [1968-HES]

Peskine, Georges. Taxi driver, naturalized Russian, picked up three men near Gare Saint-Lazare and took them to the corner of Rue de Turenne and Rue des Francs-Bourgeois Saturday night. Said the most important of the three was a Levantine (Sarkistian, aka Levine, aka Schwartz). One, a big, fair, heavy man around 30, had a Hungarian accent (Krynker). The third, a middle-aged Frenchman (Alfred Moss). Walked up towards Frans Steuvels'. [1949-MME]

pétanque. petanque style of bowls. Charlot started a game of pétanque with a fisherman. [1949-AMI]

Pétanque. There was a quiet bar close to the port, the Pétanque. [1938-owe]

Pétillon, Jacques. Jules Lapie's nephew, Jacques Pétillon had come up from Paris. He seemed nervous and sickly. [1942-FEL]

Petiot. [When the mass murderer Dr Petiot allowed his pot to overheat while it was crammed with human remains one day in March, 1944, and thick black smoke began to pour out of the chimney at 21 rue Le Sueur, the neighbors did nothing at first, since people were cooking such extraordinary things at the time. Marnham: The Man Who Wasn't Maigret, p. 209] The newspaper reported a corpse found in a cupboard at the house of a Doctor J--, [Philippe Jave], Boulevard Haussmann. He was said to be on the Côte d'Azur with his wife and daughter. The other paper said it might well become a second Petiot case, except that this time two doctors instead of one were involved.... The evening papers called it a "New Petiot Case". The article was written by little Lassagne, one of the sharpest-witted reporters. [1956-AMU]

Petit. The notary at Sancerre. The doctor was with him, and Tarvidon asked M if he should send for him for Moers. His house was in the square, next to the Café du Commerce. M rode over on a bicycle. When asked if he knew a M. Jacob, answered "Good Heavens, no! It must be a Jew." [1930-GAL]

Petit Beyrouth. Félix Nahour usually dined at the Petit Beyrouth. [1966-NAH]

Petit-Casino. M, in those days, was a devotee of the Petit-Casino, in the Porte Saint-Martin. [1946-NEW]

Petit-Clamart. The men in the Citroën had taken the road to Versailles, and went through Petit-Clamart, hardly slackening speed. [1969-TUE]

Petites Soeurs des Pauvres. see: Little Sisters of the Poor

Petitfils. M. Petitfils, the real estate agent, was with Mme. Martini when M went to William Brown's. [1932-LIB]

Petit Langoustier. Walter Lampson had bought an old fort at Porquerolles, the Petit Langoustier. [1930-PRO]

Petit Parisien. Jean Servières said he had worked for the Petit Parisien, Excelsior and the Dispatch. [Dépêche], in Paris. [1931-JAU]

Justin Minard lived in the Rue d'Enghien, just opposite the "Petit Parisien". He'd been going home by the Rue Ballu, then the Rue Chaptal, as usual. [1948-PRE]

Petit Saint-Paul. Honoré Cuendet had taken his meals at a little restaurant called the Petit Saint-Paul.... M went back to his office on foot (from the Petit Saint-Paul). [1961-PAR]

Petits-Champs, Rue des. [Paris. 1er, Louvre - 2e, Bourse. from Rue Radziwill to Avenue de la Opéra]

Moers said nearly all the button makers had their offices on the Rue des Petits-Champs, side by side with the wholesale textile houses. [1955-TEN]

Petit Var, Le. see: Le Petit Var (newspaper) said it was because Marcellin mentioned M that he was killed, according to Ginette. (Draguignan is the capital of, and Hyères is in, Var dept.) [1949-AMI]

Petrelle. Doctor. Canonge: "Old Doctor Petrelle" used to talk about Aline Calas. Dead, replaced by Camuzet, who never knew her. [1955-COR]

Petrini, Vittorio. The chauffeur, Vittorio Petrini, drove Mme. Nathalie Sabin-Levesque when she went out. She called him "Vito". [1972-CHA]

Peuchet. Chief Inspector of Boissier's branch, dealing with professional thieves. An old has-been, always half asleep. Boissier actually ran the department. [1951-GRA]

Peugeot. Reports came in about the chocolate-colored Chrysler, Krynker's car in which he, Countess Panetti and Gloria Lotti had left Claridge's, but they often turned out to be Citroëns or Peugeots. [1949-MME]

Jef van Houtte said he'd heard a splash, as if someone were falling into the Seine, and seen two men running towards a red Peugeot 403. license 7949 LF 75. [1962-CLO]

Fernand Barillard had a Peugeot 404. [1965-PAT]

Peupliers, Rue des. (Juvisy)

The identity card of the man stabbed in the alley was in his wallet. Louis Thouret, warehouse foreman, 37 Rue des Peupliers, Juvisy. Between 40 and 50. [1952-BAN]

Peyrot, Hervé. Arlette Sudre had arrived in a green sportscar with Hervé Peyrot., a wine merchant who lived on the Quai des Grands-Augustins in Paris. [1949-DAM]

PA  PE  PH  PI  PJ  PL  PM  PN  PO  PR  PS  PT  PU  PY  

PH

PHA  PHE  PHI  PHO  PHR  

Phare de Brest. see: Brest Beacon

Phénix. M asked Vladimir if it had been a woman on the Phénix who had fished his cap out of the water. [1930-PRO]

phenobarbitol. Dr. Frère said the Countess Louise Paverini always took some phenobarbitol at night. Whether it had been enough to be fatal he didn't know. [1957-VOY]

Philadelphia. Each of those people in Vichy lived quite a different life somewhere else, in Paris, Brussels, Amsterdam, Rome or Philadelphia... [1967-VIC]

Philadelphia. Spencer Oats, American criminologist from the Institute of Criminology of Philadelphia, wanted to observe M's methods. [1940-CEC]

Phil Atwater. see: Atwater, Phil

Philippe. Jean Chabot's uncle Philippe, the black sheep of the family, whose name was always brought up to Jean: "You'll wind up like your Uncle Philippe." From time to time he'd be seen dead drunk in the street, or on a ladder painting a house. [1931-GAI]

M. Philippe was the managing director of Raymond Couchet's company, Dr Rivière's Serums. Lived not far away in the Île Saint-Louis. Dark beard, about 40, serious, well-bred, intellectual. Responsible for running the company. [1931-OMB]

Louis Fillou asked Philippe at the dairy if Désiré had gone home. He said he'd never left home. [1943-CAD]

Philippe Bellamy. see: Bellamy, Philippe

Philippe Borderel. see: Borderel, Philippe

Philippe de Lancieux. see: Lancieux, Philippe de

Philippe Deligeard. see: Deligeard, Philippe

Philippe de Moricourt. see: de Moricourt, Philippe

Philippe de V--. see: V--, Philippe de

Philippe Jave. see: Jave, Philippe

Philippe Lagrange. see: Lagrange, Philippe

Philippe Lange. see: Lange, Philippe

Philippe Lauer. see: Lauer, Philippe

Philippe Lherbier. see: Lherbier, Philippe

Philippe Liotard. see: Liotard, Philippe

Philippe Mortemart. see: Mortemart, Philippe

Philippe Natali. see: Natali, Philippe

Philippi. Mariette Gibon had once lived with Philippe Natali, aka Philippi, who was sentenced to 10 years for murder in a gang killing. Two or three men killed a man from a rival gang in a tobacco shop in Rue Fontaine. He died in Fontevrault. [1952-BAN]

Philippine Le Flem. see: Le Flem, Philippine

Philps, Donald. The younger Philps brother, Donald Philps, called Joseph Van Meulen. [1957-VOY]

Philps, Herbert. Joseph Van Meulen asked if it was Herbert Philps on the phone, or his younger brother, Donald Philps. [1957-VOY]

Philps, Philps and Hadley. In London David Ward's firm of solicitors was Philps, Philps and Hadley. [1957-VOY]

Phoenix. Harry Cole said that people from Phoenix or Tucson came to Nogales to have a good time. [1949-CHE]

Pholien, Clémentine. Nicknamed "the Madwoman", of Rue Lamarck. Had been coming two or three times a week for months to the Quai des Orfèvres, sat in the waiting room knitting, waiting for "M to send for her when he needed her". A slight, graceful woman, had been running a notions shop in Montmartre, deriving a comfortable income from it. [1962-CLI]

photograph. M said he had to photograph the old lock in the gate in Nettle Lane the next day. [1930-GAL]

Phrygian. [Phrygian cap, soft felt or wool conical headdress fitting closely around the head and characterized by a pointed crown that curls forward. It originated in the ancient country of Phrygia in Asia Minor. Emancipated Roman slaves wore it as a symbol of their freedom, and it was adopted by French Revolutionaries as the "red cap of Liberty."]
M's badge was silver-plated copper, on one side the Republic's Marianne with her Phrygian cap, the letters "FF" and the word "Police" outlined in red enamel. [1966-VOL]
 

PA  PE  PH  PI  PJ  PL  PM  PN  PO  PR  PS  PT  PU  PY  

PI

PIA  PIC  PIE  PIG  PIH  PIJ  PIK  PIL  PIN  PIO  PIP  PIQ  PIR  PIS  PIT  

Piaulet. M wrote a quick note to Superintendent Piaulet: Institute exhaustive search of the 9th and 18th arrondissements tonight.... In one of the offices at Police Headquarters, Inspector Rondonnet and Chief Superintendent Piaulet were talking. [1942-FEL]

Picadilly Circus. M managed to see Charing Cross, Trafalgar Square, Picadilly Circus; mentioned Regent Street. [1952-REV]

Picard. Picard had been a packer in a shoe factory at Caen. His wife had run away. One day in Cannes Mme. Antoinette Le Cloaguen had found him... and he took up life as Octave Le Cloaguen. Had a daughter from a marriage long ago, Marie Picard. [1941-SIG]

Picard, Marie. M got a call from the Rue Damrémont Police Station, that Mlle. Jeanne, a fortuneteller at 67 bis Rue Caulaincourthad been murdered. Real name was Marie Picard, from Bayeux. Good-looking, forty-ish, plump and well-preserved, fair hair. [1941-SIG]

Picardy. [Historical region of N France, bounded before 1790 on N by Strait of Dover, Artois and Flanders, E by Champagne, S by Île de France, SW by Normandy, W by English Channel.]

Carl Lipschitzwas one of a group of agricultural laborers who were directed to big farms in Picardy and Artois.... M had the interpreter [Franz Lehel] ask Maria about the night of December 8 and night. On a farm at Saint-Gilles-les-Vaudreuves, in Picardy, an entire family was hacked to death with an axe.... Since Police Headquarters is only concerned with Paris and the neighborhood, for the past 5 months, with the Flying Squad, Colombani had been running the investigation of the Picardy Killers. [1947-MOR]

Picasso. Norris Jonker said that if a museum in the US or South America were looking for a Renoir, or a blue-period Picasso, a collector might make contacts... [1963-FAN]

On the walls of Gérard Batille's drawing room were Picassos of the blue period, Renoirs, and Marie Laurencins. [1969-TUE]

M. Sorel was one of the oldest artists on the Butte Montmartre in Montmartre, a sculptor. He said he'd seen them come and go, starting with Picasso. [1971-IND]

Pickwick. Dupeu called from the Pickwick, a bistro on Rue Delambre, in the Montparnasse area, near Rue de la Gaîté. [1959-ASS]

Nathalie Sabin-Levesque sometimes went to the Pickwick, an English pub in the Rue de Ponthieu. [1972-CHA]

Pickwick's Bar. M had the taxi take him to Pickwick's Bar from the Majestic Hotel.... Rue La Fayette. The whitish pillars of the Trinité Church, surrounded by scaffolding. Rue de Clichy. Motimer-Levingston's limousine stopped in the Rue Fontaine, outside Pickwick's Bar. [1929-30-LET]

The letter that had been left for Louise Laboine said she should ask for Jimmy [Jimmy O'Malley], at Pickwick's Bar, Rue de l'Étoile. [1954-JEU]

Picot. Picot, the officer outside Police Headquarters along with Latuile, his old friend, when Léontine Antoine first came by. [1970-FOL]

Picpus. Joseph Mascouvin had gone to the Café des Sports, at the corner of Place de la République and Boulevard Voltaire, where he had asked Nestor, the waiter, for some writing paper. On the blotter he claimed to have read the message, "tomorrow afternoon at five, I will kill the fortuneteller. Picpus." ... A calendar in the Café des Sports, for Picpus Moving Company, 101 Rue Picpus, Paris, had provided Mascouvin the inspiration for the false signature. [1941-SIG]

Jacqueline Page's mother looked after pews in the church at Picpus. [1954-MIN]

Picpus. In the Picpus district, the concierges had pulled therir chairs in front of their doorways, like in some provincial town. [1947-MOR]

Dr Pardon started his rounds at 8:00 in the morning. The Picpus quarter is not a rich one. [1966-NAH]

Picpus Moving Company. A calendar in the Café des Sports, for Picpus Moving Company, Rue Picpus, Paris, had provided Joseph Mascouvin the inspiration for the false signature. [1941-SIG]

Picpus, Rue. [Paris. 12e, Reuilly. from Rue du Faubourg Saint-Antoine to Boulevard Poniatowski. ((Rue de Picpus))]

[Paris. 12e, Reuilly. from Rue du Faubourg Saint-Antoine to Boulevard Poniatowski]

A dressmaker had been found murdered in the Rue de Picpus at dawn. [1930-GAL]

Louis Jeunet's wife, Jeanne Jeunet, said her father was a male nurse in Beaujon. He had opened a small herbalist's in the Rue Picpus, which her mother ran. [1930-31-PHO]

A calendar in the Café des Sports, for Picpus Moving Company, 101 Rue Picpus, Paris, had provided Joseph Mascouvin the inspiration for the false signature. [1941-SIG]

The traditional monthly visits with the Dr Pardons still continued, so on the previous Friday M and Mme M had made their way to the Rue Picpus. [1955-TEN]

One evening M had gone to see his friend Dr Pardon, the doctor in the Rue Picpus, at whose house they dined regularly once a month. M had had bronchitis and got up too soon, and had had to take to bed a second time, and for a while an attack of pleurisy was feared. [1956-AMU]

The day before, Dr Pardon, M's friend in the Rue Picpus, had called to tell M that Mme M had been in for a checkup. [1957-SCR]

Germain Lombras, a piano teacher who lived in the Rue #Picpus, came to Gaston Meurant's shop looking for a frame for an Italian gouache, a Neapolitan landscape he'd bought that day from an antique shop. [1959-ASS]

Léonard Planchon had lived with his mother on the Rue de Picpus, not far from M's. [1962-CLI]

M had a drink in spite of the advice of his friend Dr Pardon, the Rue Picpus doctor. [1962-COL]

Picratt's. Officer Jussiaume was on duty near Picratt's. He'd taken shelter in a doorway at the corner of Rue Fontaine and Rue Pigalle. Picratt's red sign was one of the few still lit.... There was a bakery to the left of Picratt's, a wine merchant to the right, narrow facade, a door and one window. [1950-PIC]

picture framer. Overheard M's conversation with Julien at the Brasserie Cyrano, used to have a little shop on Boulevard Rochechouart, had retired three years earlier. Very fat, red in the face, three chins, enormous stomach. Knew Marcel Vivien in 1946, from February, for about 6 months. Vivien and Nina Lassave had always lunched at the same place as him, Bonne Fourchette, Rue Dancourt; small place, perhaps half a dozen tables, only regulars. Proprieter was Boutant. [1971-SEU]

Piéchaud. Mme. Ran the grocery on the ground floor of Cécile Pardon's building. Known as the widow Piéchaud, but actually her husband had run off with another woman, a 'woman of easy virtue.' [1940-CEC]

Piéchaud. Poitiers had called that they were sending Piéchaud and Boivert. They'd left by car over an hour earlier. They'd both worked with M. Piéchaud, about 35, had nearly been killed while arresting a Pole, and his right cheek bore a scar left by a revolver bullet. [1947-VAC]

Piedboeuf. Lucas phoned to Moulins. Found out Mary Lampson's birth certificate had been from there, under the name Marie Dupin. But the Marie Dupin registered in Moulins was 42, married to a baker, Piedboeuf, in the Rue Haute, three children, weighed 13 stone. [1930-PRO]

M. Piedboeuf, bearded, worked at the Bon Marché. Lived on 2nd floor opposite Mlle. Clément's. [1951-MEU]

Piedboeuf, from the Gros-Chêne farm, had asked Joseph Gastin to sign a paper, and so he'd left the classroom, though he first reported he hadn't. [1953-ECO]

Blacksmith listed as a telephone subscriber at Boissancourt-par-Saint-André. [1955-COR]

Piedboeuf. The partner of the policeman who arrested the man at the tower was Piedboeuf. [1931-JAU]

Constable Piedboeuf, on duty in front of a night-club in the Rue de Douai reported that a man of two couples going in reported that the body [Albert Rochain] had been dumped from a yellow Citroën, with Paris numbers ending in 38. [1947-MOR]

Chief Superintendent of the Criminal Police in charge of the investigation of Nina Lassave's murder in August, 1946. By M's memory he should have been a little under 55 at the time. He knew his job inside out and was not a man to be trifled with. [1971-SEU]

Piedboeuf, Gérard. Germaine Piedboeuf lived with her father, a night watchman at the factory, and her brother, Gérard Piedboeuf. [1932-FLA]

Piedboeuf, Germaine. Anna Peeters pointed out the house where Germaine Piedboeuf lived, the woman who claimed to have had her brother Joseph Peeters' child, and who had disappeared. [1932-FLA]

Piedmont. Maurice Marcia had come to M's office about his bartender, Freddy Strazzia, from Piedmont, who'd possibly taken part in a holdup at a branch of a big bank, in Puteaux. [1971-IND]

Pie Qui Danse, La. see: La Pie Qui Danse Jean-Claude Ternel had gone with Marinette Augier to La Pie Qui Danse, out in the country between Meulan and Apremont. [1963-FAN]

Piercot. The Commissioner called M directly at Mlle. Clément's. The Examining Magistrate had asked him to ring about the Piercot case. [1951-MEU]

Pierre. Jean or Pierre or Gaston... M imagined the murderer's wife's surprise... [1967-VIC]

Pierre. Someone called out to The Simoun at the lock at Vitry-le-François where some 60 boats were lined up: Your sister-in-law at Chalon-sur-Saône said she'll see you on the Burgundy canal... the Christening can wait... Pierre sends his regards. [1930-PRO]

M had had an aunt, stouter than Juliette Martin. Whenever she'd come to M's home in his childhood, she'd start, "My poor dear Hermance... What a life! I must tell you what Pierre had done..." [1931-OMB]

Fernande said the men were playing belote - Belote! Rebelote! You, Pierre. Passe! repasse. You, Marcel. [1934-MAI]

M called Pierre, the head porter at the Ritz, about Ed Gollan. [1963-FAN]

Pierre. M answered the call, from Pierre at Emergencies [Emergency] about a crime in the hotel Étoile du Nord. [1937-38-eto]

Pierre #Musellier. see: Musellier, Pierre

Pierre Delteil. see: Delteil, Pierre

Pierre Duché. see: Duché, Pierre

Pierre Eyraud. see: Eyraud, Pierre

Pierre Ferchaud. see: Ferchaud, Pierre

Pierre Le Clinche. see: Le Clinche, Pierre

Pierre Louchard. see: Louchard, Pierre

Pierre Merlot. see: Merlot, Pierre

Pierre Millard. see: Millard, Pierre

Pierre Nahour. see: Nahour, Pierre

Pierre Renoir. see: Renoir, Pierre

Pierre Sabatini. see: Sabatini, Pierre

Pierrot. Émile Ducrau asked Pierrot if it was true that Murier's old tub got caught on a bridge pier at Château-Thierry. [1933-ECL]

[Pierre Eyraud]. Désirée Brault said a man called Pierrot had once called Louise Filon.... The concierge, Mme. Cornet, said Pierrot was about 30, fair and thickset, who looked more like a butcher's apprentice than a musician. [1953-TRO]

Nicolas Cajou said he'd heard Ginette Meurant call the man Pierrot [Pierre Millard], and he had the impression he came from the south, or maybe was a Corsican. [1959-ASS]

Pierrot Basso. see Basso, Pierrot [1931-GUI]

Pierrot Janvier. see: Janvier, Pierrot

Pierrot Le Clinche. see: Le Clinche, Pierrot

Pietr. A coded telegram from Interpol read, To Sûreté Générale, Paris. Police Cracow report Pietr the Lett passed through on way to Bremen.... M glanced through a cable from the International Identification Bureau at Copenhagen, and translated: Pietr le Letton, apparent age, 32 years, height 5' 6 1/2", Nose: bridge straight, base horizontal, jutting out. Ears: large Original Border, crossed lobe, outward anti-tragus, lower fold straight; peculiarity: spaces between the folds. Long face. Sparse light-brown eyebrows. Lower lip prominent, thick, drooping. Long neck. Eyes: halo around the pupil mid-yellow, periphery of the iris mid-green. Light blond hair. A verbal portrait of Pietr, or Piet, the Lett.... M read another telegram in polcod, from Bremen: Pietr the Lett reportedly making for Amsterdam and Brussels.... Pietr, followed by three porters and proceeded by a representative of a luxury hotel in the Champs-Élysées left the North Star.... On the stroke of 8 Pietr came out of his room, in a dinner jacket whose classic lines bore the mark of Savile Row.... Pietr had been arrested twice, once at Wiesbaden, for fraud of half a million marks from a Munich wholesaler, once at Madrid, similarly, with a prominent member of Spanish court society.... Pietr had doubtless met the Mortimer-Levingstons in Berlin, Warsaw, London, or New York.... Pietr was of uncertain nationality, but Nordic origin, probably Latvian or Estonian. Spoke Russian, French, English and German fluently.... Pietr was probably connected with the Maronneti gang, which forged bank notes and identity papers, and the "wall-borers" gang in Cologne.... Pietr was thought to be the head of an international gang, traced at various times to Paris, Amsterdam (the Van Heuvel case), Berne (the United Shipbuilders case), Warsaw (the Lipmann case), and others.... His real name was Pietr Johansson, and he was killed by his brother Hans [Hans Johansson]. He used the name Oswald Oppenheim at the Majestic Hotel, Olaf Swann in Fécamp. Fédor Yurovich, Hans, was the name he used at the Au Roi-de-Sicile hotel. [1929-30-LET]

Pietr Johansson. see: Johannson, Pietr

Pigalle. Émile Lentin said he walked as far as Place Clichy [Place de Clichy] and nearly all the bars were closed. Then he went along the Boulevard as far as Pigalle. [1956-ECH]

Falconi and Scapucci were two regulars at the Eucalyptus, two men with records who cropped up periodically around Pigalle. [1959-ASS]

As for the criminals of Pigalle, he only knew a few of them now, mainly old hands. [1962-COL]

The second floor tenant said she'd rather the pimps around the Pigalle any day over Léon Florentin. [1968-ENF]

Pigalle. Véliard said Inspector Louis of the 9th, who knew Pigalle like the back of his hand, might know more.... [1971-IND]

Pigalle, Brasserie. The driver told M the drunk they'd just passed was Dutilleux, a pal of his, who loved dressing up, especially as a drunk. M told him to stop outside the Brasserie Pigalle. [1955-TEN]

Pigalle, Hôtel. see: Hôtel Pigalle

Pigalle, Place. [Paris. 9e, Opéra. from Boulevard de Clichy to Rue Pigalle]

A tram was passing for the Place Pigalle when M left his house, so he decided to go to the Hôtel Pigalle first.... Through the window of Nine Moinard's hotel room M could see the Place Pigalle., its tiny garden, the hoardings advertising nightclubs. [1931-OMB]

Céline Germain said that Georges Bompard had picked up his case in an all-night bistro in the Place Pigalle. [1937-38-eto]

A tough guy from the Bastille area or the Place Pigalle would have put them down as choirboys. [1949-CHE]

The taxi driver that Lamballe had sent was usually parked in the Place Pigalle. Had eaten lunch in a restaurant in Rue Lepic. Came from Pantin. Took Gloria Lotti and the boy to Porte de Neuilly, then towards Gare Saint-Lazare. They got out at Place Saint-Augustin, and hailed one of the Urbaine Taxi Company's cabs.... The taxi with the woman (Gloria Lotti) and the child drove off toward Boulevard Rochechouart, and turned left towards Place Pigalle. [1949-MME]

Lognon was the great authority on the Place Blanche and Place Pigalle area. [1954-JEU]

If M wanted a beer, he'd have to go to Montparnasse or the Place Pigalle, and he hadn't the heart for it. [1955-TEN]

That eveining they'd done Paris by Night: They'd gone to Les Halles, Place Pigalle, Rue de Lappe and the Champs-Élysées, their tickets including the cost of a drink at each place. [1956-ECH]

One of the people waiting in the "aquarium" was a little pimp who had "Place Pigalle" written all over him. [1957-SCR]

Adrien Josset and his wife had gone to the premierre of Témoins at the Théâtre de la Madeleine [Madeleine Theater] the night before, then ate at a nightclub on Place Pigalle. [1959-CON]

Nicolas Cajou, manager of a small hotel on Rue Victor-Massé, around the corner from Place Pigalle, recognized Ginette Meurant's photo. He'd been convalescing in Morvan, where his family came from. [1959-ASS]

Torrence reported another jewel robbery, at the Plaza Athénée, a fight at 3:15 am in Place Pigalle, a stabbing after a dance in Boulevard Rochechouart. [1962-CLI]

Nora owned a dozen nightclubs, including some in the Place Pigalle area and one on the Champs-Élysées. [1966-VOL]

M returned to the Quai des Orfèvres, where he might learn of a young tough from Pigalle, newly arrived from Marseilles or Bastia, who had done in a rival to prove he was a man. [1968-HES]

Marcel Vivien's girlfriend, Nina Lassave, had her own apartment on the Boulevard Rochechouart, not very far from Place Pigalle, inherited from her mother who had died the year before. [1971-SEU]

Pigalle, Rue. [Paris. 9e, Opéra. from Rue Blanche to Place Pigalle]

M heard footsteps hurrying down the Rue Pigalle after he'd been shot. [1929-30-LET]

Nine Moinard lived at the Hôtel Pigalle, in the Rue Pigalle.... M and Nine walked from the Moulin Bleu to the Rue Pigalle, where they spotted the crowd in front of the Hôtel Pigalle, where Roger Couchet had jumped from a window. [1931-OMB]

A chance visitor to Marina's in the Rue Pigalle wouldn't have suspected that the thickset man in the heavy overcoat was Superintendent Maigret of the Police Judiciaire. [1936-pig]

Louis the Kid told M he'd interrogated him from nine at night to five in the morning. Something to do with dope. A few years back. He'd been a messenger at the Célis in the Rue Pigalle. [1937-38-ber]

Jacques Pétillon was a saxophone player in a nightclub on Rue Pigalle. [1942-FEL]

M's conversation with Georges Simenon was interrupted when he learned a young informer from the Rue Pigalle wanted to speak with him. [1950-MEM]

Officer Jussiaume was on duty near Picratt's. He'd taken shelter in a doorway at the corner of Rue Fontaine and Rue Pigalle. Picratt's red sign was one of the few still lit.... Before taking a taxi to the Rue Pigalle, M had a brandy at the Brasserie Dauphine.... M was walking along the Rue Pigalle when he heard the car with the Public Prosecutor stop. [1950-PIC]

Émile Boulay had bought a nightclub in the Rue Pigalle, the Lotus, and now he owned four.... The Lotus was right at the top of Rue Pigalle. [1962-COL]

During these 30 years plenty of vagrants had disappeared from the Pigalle district. Some... kept slightly shady restaurants somewhere between Marseilles and Nice.... In March there'd been a fight between two gangs in the Pigalle district. [1964-DEF]

The girl M. Louis was with in the Clou Doré was Louise Pégasse, nicknamed Lulu the Torpedo . [Lulu la Torpille], the name she appeared under in a striptease club, the Boule Verte on Rue Pigalle. [1965-PAT]

The Flea lived with a hostess at the Canary on Rue Pigalle. [1971-IND]

Piget. Chief Inspector Piget of the 15th came to the scene of Sophie Ricain's murder. [1966-VOL]

Pigoud, Blanche. The Flea's girlfriend was Blanche Pigoud. [1971-IND]

Pigou, Gilbert. Anne-Marie Boutin remembered that the former accountant, Gilbert Pigou had left the firm towards the end of June, fired in a crude way. [1969-VIN]

Pigou, Liliane. Gilbert Pigou's wife was Liliane. [1969-VIN]

Pihan Tearooms. Maxime Le Bret's wife was supposed to have tea with Lise Gendreau-Balthazar and the Comtesse Bernadette d'Estireau at the Pihan Tearooms in the Rue du Faubourg-Saint-Honoré. [1948-PRE]

Pijpekamp. The Dutch police inspector's name was Pijpekamp. [1931-HOL]

Pike. Superintendent Pike [Pyke], of the Yard [Scotland Yard], whom M knew quite well, phoned from London every morning. [1956-ECH]

Pillement. M had come to Nemours the previous evening on a matter of minor importance that had to be settled with Captain Pillement of the gendarmerie, who had been trained at the artillery school in Saumur. [1937-38-noy]

Pills, Harry. The tall blond man M had seen at the Manhattan Bar was Harry Pills, from St Louis.... Harry Pills told Baron he'd actually met M at a cocktail party in St Louis, and gone to a lecture he'd given.... Harry Pills, the St Louis assistant DA, had a name like a singer. [1951-LOG]

Pinaco, Maria. At the time of Count Hans von Farnheim's death Maria Pinaco had been 23, the kichen maid. [1950-PIC]

Pinard. Maître. Joseph Joseph Mascoulin was sitting at his table in the Filet de Sole with Maître Pinard, a lawyer almost as famous as he was for the ferocity of his speeches. [1954-MIN]

Pincemail, Maison. see: Maison Pincemail

Pineau. A regional French aperitif, made in the départements of Charente and Charente-Maritime in western France. (also: Pineau des Charentes)

Dr Pardon brought out a Pineau from Charentes, which the vineyard owner Jonzac had sent him. [1952-REV]

Pink Rabbit. Lourtie called from the Rue Fontaine to say Émile Branchu had gone to a striptease club, the Pink Rabbit. [1969-TUE]

Pinky. M thought of Sergeant Jimmy Van Fleet as the Dutchman. His friends called him Pinky. [1949-CHE]

Piollet. Maîtres Laval and Piollet, Consultant Solicitors Juliette Martin had contacted on Nov. 16 with regard to Raymond Couchet's will. [1931-OMB]

Pioneer Hotel. M did not say another word until Harry Cole dropped him off at the Pioneer Hotel. [1949-CHE]

pipe. see Maigret's Pipe (La pipe de Maigret) by Murielle Wenger

Talking to Tiburce de Saint-Hilaire, M clenched his jaw so hard the stem of his pipe broke clean in two between his teeth. [1930-GAL]

After Joseph Heurtin disappeared from the Citanguette, M tapped his pockets, feeling for his pipe, but it was not there. No doubt he regarded it as an evil omen... [1930-31-TET]

At that point M bit the stem of his pipe so hard he broke it and the bowl dropped onto the floor. Else Anderson was not in her room. [1931-NUI]

Anna Peeters father smoked his meerschaum pipe, oblivious of everything around him. [1932-FLA]

M had made it a practice ever since the Radek case, during which he'd found himself without a pipe just when he needed one, to carry two or three pipes. [1932-LIB]

Émile Ducrau was smoking a meerschaum with a cherry-wood mouthpiece so long he had to hold the bowl... Émile Ducrau picked up his pipe. It had not been broken - only the meerschaum had cracked, and he moistened his finger and ran it along the crack. [1933-ECL]

M's nerves were so taut that the stem of his pipe cracked between his teeth. [1938-owe]

From the moment he lit it in the doorway of the apartment house on the Boulevard Richard-Lenoir, M savored his pipe with greater enjoyment than on other mornings. [1940-CEC]

Even his pipe, an unusually large one, seemed to taste of spring. [1942-FEL]

Waiting for Félicie's response to "And the wardrobe?", M "was so tense that he bit through the ebonite mouthpiece of his pipe." [1942-FEL]

There were three pipes, one of them a meerschaum, but his favorite, a thick briar with a slightly curved stem which his wife had given him for a birthday present ten years before was not there. [1945-pip]

M had bought himself an expensive pipe, although usually Mme M bought him one for his birthday.... M's jaws clenched so tightly during the conversation with Joseph Daumale that the stem of his pipe snapped between his teeth, the one he had bought on his second day in New York. [1946-NEW]

Pipes were forbidden in the Savoy grill. M got a cigar from a passing cart. [1952-REV]

M went into a tobacconist's to buy a pipe, having left so hastily he only had one with him. [1957-VOY]

M looked at the mantle and saw Honoré Cuendet's three pipes, one of them a meerschaum. [1961-PAR]

It was an idle afternoon, and the 6 or 7 pipes on M's desk lasted him until he went home. [1966-NAH]

M bit down so hard on his pipe that he cracked the ebonite stem. He had the feeling he'd overlooked something important.... M filled his meerschaum pipe that he never smoked anywhere except at home. [1968-ENF]

M looked at Antoinette Vague's dead body. There was a sharp little sound. It was the stem of M's pipe breaking under the pressure of his bite. The bowl fell to the floor. [1968-HES]

M was playing with the 5 or 6 pipes on his desk.... M began to fill a heavy pipe. [1972-CHA]

Pipi. After Philippe Mortemart went to the washroom in a bar on Rue Lepic, Janvier went in and questioned Mme Pipi. [1950-PIC]

Aline told M she had once gone to a Madame Pipi for an abortion, a ladies'-room attendant in Montmartre. [1964-DEF]

Piquart. A policeman in La Ferté-Alais, Piquart, had located Marcel Basso. [1931-GUI]

Piquemal, Jules. 15 years as a supervisor at the National School of Civil Engineering. Brought a copy of the Calame report to Auguste Point. About 45. Lived at the Hôtel du Berry, Rue Jacob.... Lapointe found membership cards in Jules Piquemal's room. The oldest was for the Association of the Croix de Feu. Another, from 1937, was for the Action Française [ultra-right-wing groups. footnote in English ed.] . Immediately after the war, Jules Piquemal had joined the Communist Party. The card was renewed for three years. He also belonged to the International Theosophical League, based in Switzerland. There were also two books about yoga and a manual of judo. [1954-MIN]

piquet. M remembered his own village, where there was a deputy-mayor who drank, but in those days they hadn't played belote, it was piquet. [1953-ECO]

Pirouet. Called Monsieur Pirouet, in the Forensic Laboratory, up under the roof in the Palais de Justice. A curious fellow, fat and hardy, came recently as an assistant chemist, but was an astonishingly good graphologist.... Pirouet had analysed the ink on the signature of the bill of sale for Léonard Planchon's company, and was sure it was more than two weeks old. [1962-CLI]

Pirouet, Marie. Émile Boulay had had an accident while driving to Rouen with his wife, Marie Pirouet, who was pregnant. She was killed in the crash. [1962-COL]

Piroulet. Colombani checked the flights. 315 for London; Stuttgart; Cairo, Beirut... P Potteret; New York by Pan American, Pittsburg... Piroulet... no Louise Paverini. [1957-VOY]

Pissaro. Manessi said Norris Jonker grew up surrounded by Van Goghs, Pissaros, Manets and Renoirs. [1963-FAN]

Pitié. Dr Pardon had told the man they were very close to the Pitié [not in Fr. ed.] and not far from the Hospital Saint-Antoine. [1966-NAH]

Pitois. M. Louis's colleague, Pitois, whom M knew, was sure he'd never seen the dead man. [1938-owe]

Pittsburg. Colombani checked the flights. 315 for London; Stuttgart; Cairo, Beirut... P Potteret; New York by Pan American, Pittsburg... Piroulet... no Louise Paverini. [1957-VOY]

PA  PE  PH  PI  PJ  PL  PM  PN  PO  PR  PS  PT  PU  PY  

PJ

PJS  

PJ's general information. see: Police Judiciaire After dinner M called PJ's general information. An old lady had jumped out of a window on Boulevard Barbès, a corpse had been found in the Seine at Pont de Saint-Cloud. [1962-CLI]

PA  PE  PH  PI  PJ  PL  PM  PN  PO  PR  PS  PT  PU  PY  

PL

PLA  PLO  

Plaine Monceau. Maxime Le Bret was probably the only superintendent in Paris to keep a carriage and live on the Plaine Monceau, in one of the new houses in the Boulevard de Courcelles. [1948-PRE]

Planchard. Charles Dandurand's lawyer. He asked M to call him when he was being confronted by Gérard Pardon. M had Torrence get him from Court 11. [1940-CEC]

Planchart. Alfred Jussiaume had worked for the firm of Planchart, safemakers, and when he left them, took up robbing the safes he'd installed. [1951-GRA]

Planche. The men from the Public Prosecutor's arrived, and the young magistrate, Planche, with whom M hadn't worked before. Then the men from Criminal Records Office arrived. [1956-ECH]

Planchon, Isabelle. 7. Léonard Planchon's daughter. Like her mother, except Planchon's fair hair and pale eyes. [1962-CLI]

Planchon, Léonard. Had a harelip. "the Saturday caller", as he was known at the Quai des Orfèvres. 36. Owned a painting and decorating firm, sometimes employing five or six men. His eyes were pale blue, fair hair slightly reddish. Planchon had lived with his mother on the Rue de Picpus, not far from M's. Mother died when he was 15, had been a cleaning woman. Never knew his father. When Planchon was 26, his boss, who lived on the Rue Tholozé, found out he had heart disease and decided to retire to the country. Took Planchon 6 years to pay off the busines. Rue Tholozé leads into the Rue Lepic, right in front of the Moulin de la Galette, a dead end at a few steps. Lived by the steps in a small house in the yard. About halfway along the street, on the right-hand side, there was a little dance hall, the Bal des Copains, where he met his wife. Murdered by his wife and Roger Prou, one of his workers, who had moved into his house and taken over his position. [1962-CLI]

Planchon, Renée. 27. Léonard Planchon's wife. Dark, like many people from the Vendée. Met him in the Bal des Copains. Came from Saint-Sauveur, near Fontenay-le-Comte in the Vendée, Planchon's mother's town. She'd only been in Paris a month, a general helper at a dairy on the Rue Lepic. She was just 18. Spent her childhood on a farm. [1962-CLI]

plane. M's plane was a two-engine one, for Marseilles. [1971-IND]

Planta, La. see: La Planta

Plaza Athénée. Torrence reported another jewel robbery, at the Plaza Athénée, on Avenue Montaigne. Vacher had been there. Torrence sent Dupeu to help. [1962-CLI]

Plouhinec, Maxime le Bret de. Maxime Le Bret's full name was Maxime le Bret de Plouhinec. He was an officer of the Legion of Honor. [1948-PRE]

PA  PE  PH  PI  PJ  PL  PM  PN  PO  PR  PS  PT  PU  PY  

PM

PMU  

PMU. M told Coméliau he'd had all the P.M.U. lessees questioned, the Pari-Mutuel-Urbain, the off-track betting shops. [1947-MOR]

PA  PE  PH  PI  PJ  PL  PM  PN  PO  PR  PS  PT  PU  PY  

PN

PNE  

pneumatique. The editor of one of the largest morning papers, Frémiet, called M. They'd known each other for many years. An anonymous letter had come by pneumatique, from the Rue du Faubourg-Montmartre pneumatique office. [1969-TUE]

PA  PE  PH  PI  PJ  PL  PM  PN  PO  PR  PS  PT  PU  PY  

PO

POG  POI  POK  POL  POM  PON  POO  POP  POR  POS  POT  POU  POZ  

Pogny. The lock-keeper at Sarry said his dog had barked during the night. Thought the Providence had spent the night at Pogny... The lock-keeper at Pogny, Désiré, told M he proably wouldn't catch up with the Providence till Vitry-le-François.. [1930-PRO]

Point, Anne-Marie. 24. Auguste Point's daughter. Engaged to Alain Courmont, to be married the next month. Graduated in philosophy and literature. [1954-MIN]

Point, Auguste. Minister of Public Works. Called M at his home to tell him of the missing Calame report. 27, Boulevard Pasteur. All M knew was that he was a lawyer from the Vendée, from La Roche-sur-Yon. He was one of those deputies elected after the war for their personal qualities and their conduct during the occupation. About the same build and height as M, though squarer and heavier looking, about the same age.... Julien Chabot told M that Auguste Point had graduated in law from Poitiers, about the same year as Julien Chabot and M. Opened a law office in Town Hall Square, at La Roche-sur-Yon-sur-Yon. Married the daughter of a solicitor, Arthur Belion, whose widow still lived at La Roche-sur-Yon. Everyone was surprised when, a few weeks before the German retreat they arrested him, and took him to Niort, then somewhere in Alsace. They caught three of four others at the same time, one a surgeon from Bressuire. throughout the war Point had hidden British agents and pilots escaped from German camps in the farm he owned near La Roche-sur-Yon. [1954-MIN]

Pointe de l'Aiguillon. In the distance M saw an island, or perhaps the Pointe de l'Aiguillon. [1953-ECO]

Pointe des Baleines. Every two minutes could be heard the foghorn on the Pointe des Baleines, on the Île de Ré across the harbor. [1940-JUG]

Point, Evariste. Evariste Point was Auguste Point's father, owned a well-known hotel at Sainte-Hermine, Clemenceau's town, famous for it's cuisine. [1954-MIN]

Point, Henriette. Auguste Point's wife. Could have been any little middle-aged bourgeoisie. Her father was a lawyer in La Roche-sur-Yon. [1954-MIN]

Point Noire. Désiré Boursicault was now on his way to Pointe Noire, in Equatorial Africa. [1951-MEU]

Poiret. The Public Prosecutor had appointed an Examining Magistrate, Poiret, a young man M had never worked with. Tall, fair hair, crewcut. [1969-TUE]

Poissonière, Rue. [Paris. 2e, Bourse. from Rue de Cléry to Boulevard Bonne-Nouvelle]

A year later, in an exporters on the Rue Poissonière, M met Anna Peeters again. [1932-FLA]

Poissonneau, Olga. Olga-Jeanne-Marie Poissonneau, 29, born at Saint-Joris-sur-Isère, unemployed, residing at the Hôtel Beauséjour, Rue Lepic, Paris 18e. Maurice Tremblet's mistress. Tall, dark, soft-looking, moon-faced. Tremblet visited her twice a week for the past five years. Knew him as Monsieur Charles. Had met him outside a cinema in the Boulevard Rochechouart when she was a waitress at a prix fixe restaurant in the Place de Clichy. Told her he lived near Orléans. [1946-pau]

Poissy. [commune, N France, Yvelines dept. pop. 1968: 33,555. on Seine river 11 mi. WNW of Paris.]

A few miles from Paris M had diverged from the route along the Seine. At Poissy he'd climbed the hill, and suddenly, surrounded by real fields and orchards, was this little isolated community, Jeanneville Estate. [1942-FEL]

A fish dealer from Honfleur driving along Route 13 in the Forêt de Saint-Germain between Poissy and Le Pecq picked up Lognon, unconscious on the side of the road. Took him to Dr. Grenier's at Saint-Germain. [1951-LOG]

The head lock-keeper at Suresnes said De Zwarte Zwaan should have been at Juziers, or at any rate beyond Poissy, depending on how long they'd had to wait at the locks at Bougival and Carrière. [1962-CLO]

Poitiers. [city, WC France, capital, Vienne dept. pop. 1968: 70,681. 100 mi. ESE of Nantes.]

Thérèse, the chambermaid at the hotel said once Albert Forlacroix's sister, Lise Forlacroix had run away to Poitiers. She bought M a razor for 3 francs 50. [1940-JUG]

Mansuy said he'd notified the Public Prosecutor at La Roche-sur-Yon. He'd insisted on notifying the Flying Squad at Poitiers. [1947-VAC]

The Poitiers Flying Squad was also on the scene in Fontenay-le-Comte investigating the murders.... Julien Chabot told M that even for taking fingerprints he was obliged to send for someone from Poitiers. [1953-PEU]

At Poitiers, while the train was in the station, the lights went up all at once along the platforms, but it wasn't dark yet. [1953-ECO]

Julien Chabot told M that Auguste Point had graduated in law from Poitiers, about the same year as Julien Chabot and M. [1954-MIN]

M asked if the wine was from Sancerre. The proprieter (Aline Calas ) replied that it was from a little village near Poitiers, (which accounted for the slight flinty tang)... Aline said her husband must have taken the train to Poitiers. From there by bus to Saint-Aubin or some other village in the district. Usually stayed at a local inn. [1955-COR]

Philippe Jave was born at Poitiers. [1956-AMU]

Lousteau, a grain merchant from near Niort, was in the same car as Martin Duché on his way home. Had recognized him after the car emptied out at Poitiers, and only the two of them were left. [1959-CON]

An elderly lawyer was discussing precedents, in Limoges in 1885 and Poitiers in 1923, in which the preliminary investigation had been recast at the public trial. [1959-ASS]

Jean-Charles Gaillard had left for Poitiers that morning, for a case. [1962-COL]

Joséphine Papet had told François Paré that she came from Poitiers. [1968-ENF]

Poitou. [Historical region of WC France, bounded anciently on NW by Brittany, N by Anjou and Saumurois, NE by Touraine, E by Marche, SE by Limousin, S by Angoumois and Aunis, W by Atlantic Ocean.]

Mme. Doncoeur told M the people who'd lived in the apartment before Jean Martin were an old engineer from the Highway and Bridges Department, his wife, and deaf-and-dumb daughter. When they left Paris they moved to Poitou she believed. [1950-noe]

Poitou, Le. see: Le Poitou . They walked along the Quai de Bourbon as far as the Pont Marie, and as they crossed the bridge they could see a grayish barge with the red and white triangle of the Compagnie Générale painted on the bow of the Le Poitou, being unloaded of sand by a crane. [1962-CLO]

poker. The bartender had noticed John Arnold playing poker with three Americans. [1957-VOY]

Poker d'As, Le. see: Le Poker d'As Arlette had called Marco for Mariette Gibon from a restaurant on the Boulevard Voltaire, to tell him not to come to the house till she told him it was clear. Left a message for him with Félix, a waiter in Le Poker d'As, a bar in Rue de Douai. [1952-BAN]

Polaire. Marie was as slender of waist as Polaire, and tiny. [1948-PRE]

Poland. Pskov was in Russia. M had looked it up in an atlas. Near the Baltic. Several little countries there, Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania, encircled by Poland and Russia.... and there Jews as well, scattered everywhere. [1929-30-LET]

Adolphe Bonvoisin, a Frenchman from Lille, had come from Lwow, representing a cotton-spinning firm with a branch in Poland. [1936-arr]

Armand de Saint-Hilaire was 26 when he met Isabelle de V--, about 1910. Possibly they didn't marry as he'd just started his career in the Foreign Service and had been sent to Poland as 2nd or 3rd secretary to the Ambassador. [1960-VIE]

Mlle. Motte lived in the Rue des Francs-Bourgeois, the Marais district, with a few historic houses, mainly small artisans, from Poland, Hungary or Lithuania. [1964-DEF]

polcod. The secret international language use by police headquarters all over the world. M read another telegram in polcod, from Bremen. [1929-30-LET]

Pole. In a letter from Anna Gorskin's father: We are caught between the Lithuanians and the Poles, they both hate the Jews.... M remembered a Pole, thin, blond, 22, his mother a charwoman. Five years later he was a dsitinguished scientist, aloof, short-spoken, cold, dined with the President.... In the passage near the Au Roi-de-Sicile M ran into two collarless Poles, who looked away when they saw him coming.... At last Pietr came to the Rue du Roi-de-Sicile, a crooked street fringed with blind alleys, still half-Jewish, but already half a Polish colony, and turned into the lobby of a hotel.... The notorious Polish gang whose leaders all ended on the scaffold went in for killing. [1929-30-LET]

There was a Pole whose papers weren't in order. They took him away too. [1930-31-TET]

During the past four years a gang of Poles had attacked five farms, always in Northern France. The farms had been isolated, the farmers elderly. Always on the day after a market day the crimes occurred, and everyone was killed, including children, their throats slashed with knives. A 12-year old boy had seen a one-eyed man. Others said the gang wore black masks... [1937-38-sta]

M said he'd bet the man [Stephan Strevzki] was a Pole. [1939-hom]

Mimile told M he could leave Paris in 24 hours if he could find the Pole to take care of the animals.... Mimile met a Pole at À ma Bourgogne, and since he could speak a little Polish, got him to help him. [1945-FAC]

It seemed to M that there were freshly arrived Italians, Poles and Czechs... [1946-NEW]

In October of the previous winter a Pole, 'Stan the Killer', who had attacked a number of farms in the north of France, had holed up in a small hotel at the corner of the Rue de Birague and the Rue du Faubourg-Saint-Antoine. He'd shot down the two policemen outside, and had then shot himself. [1946-mal]

Piéchaud, about 35, had nearly been killed while arresting a Pole, and his right cheek bore a scar left by a revolver bullet. [1947-VAC]

As a few Poles were living in the area, and no Czechs, some people talked about a "Polish gang".... Asked if there were any Czechs in the neighborhood, the answer would invariably be, "Poles, Italians, and Armenian... but no Czechs." [1947-MOR]

The man from Barodet's squad who was digging was Barrère, who'd been shot a month earlier arresting a Pole in the Rue Caulaincourt. [1948-PRE]

M might find himself asked, "Haven't you arrested your Pole on the Rue de Birague yet?" It wasn't that he had anything against Poles. But at that time thousands had come to France to work in the mines in the north. Most were good workers, but there was also a percentage of trouble-making riff-raff.... In the Saint-Antoine district M found up to 7 or 8 Poles in a single room, most of them sleeping on the floor. [1950-MEM]

They'd been involved in more difficult arrests. M thought of a Pole who had for months terrorized the farms in the North and finally holed up in a little hotel in Paris, armed to the teeth. [1951-LOG]

M had been studying all the historical cases which bore some resemblance... Jack the Ripper, the Düsseldorf Vampire, the Viennese lamplighter, and the Pole who operated among the farms in the Aisne Department. [1955-TEN]

It had happened between two Poles, in a hovel near the Porte d'Italie. A laborer who spoke bad French, a wretched puny man called Stéphane, with an unpronouncable last name, lived there with a woman and four small children. The woman was the wife of Majewski, who'd been a farm laborer on farms in the north. The two eldest children were Majewski's. Stéphane said Majewski had given him his wife... sold her to him. Majewski had come back, and during the night Stéphane had stabbed him and the wife. [1961-BRA]

One of the letters was from Wanda, who Jeanne Chabut thought must be a Russian or a Pole. [1969-VIN]

Poles. All the year round, by tens, hundreds, thousands, Poles, Jews, Rumanians, Italian s were streaming outwards to the four corners of the globe. [1932-FOU]

M glanced through the papers on his desk. Routine stuff. A group of Poles that needed watching... [1940-JUG]

A gang of Poles, 5 or 6 of them, were holed up in the squalid Hôtel des Arcades. One of them, nicknamed the Baron, had changed a bill stolen from the Vansittart farm, at a parimutuel window at Longchamps. [1940-CEC]

M. Lorilleux had a shop in the Palais-Royal, which sold souvineers and old coins. When he disappeared one day, his business was taken over by some Poles. [1950-noe]

Police Benevolent Association. Much against his will, for three years running M had been elected Vice-President of the Police Benevolent Assoiciation. [1954-MIN]

Police Commissioner. Was attending a foreign press dinner at a big hotel on Avenue Montaigne when the head of Police Judiciaire got through to him with the news about André Delteil. [1952-REV]

Police de Jeux. M read in the paper that the assistant directed of the Police de Jeux was likely to be implicated in the Graphopolous cheating affair. [1932-LIB]

Police des Moeurs. At the Police des Moeurs M learned that Sylvie was on the register and was well known. [1932-LIB]

Police Emergency Center. On the enormous map of Paris that covered a large part of the wall, a small white disk lighted up. The roar of the traffic on the Île de la Cité penetrated this room, that was the brain of the Police Emergency Center. Below, in the courtyard of Police Headquarters... [1941-SIG]

Police Headquarters. M greeted the office boy at Police Headquarters by his Christian name.... They reached Meaux, and M told the driver to take them to Police Headquarters, Quai des Orfèvres. [1930-31-PHO]

Oscar said if M checked at Police Headquarters they'd say he'd been picked up once or twice in raids, as he used to go to the Rue de Lappe to dance a java... [1931-NUI]

At Headquarters [Police Headquarters] for the past five days Capt. Yves Joris had been known simply as "the Bloke". [l'Homme] [1932-POR]

Martin pushed open the glazed door of the waiting room of the Head Office; as sparsely lighted as the rest of the building at Police Headquarters. In the middle of it was a huge round sofa covered in red velvet. The old porter was in his glass cage, eating his dinner. [1936-bea]

M ordered Christiani to call Lucas at Police Headquarters. [1936-pig]

Since he'd been landed with this case in the Rue Saint-Denis, M had been in one of his worst moods, tense and edgy, which made him unapproachable at Police Headquarters. [1936-err]

Michael Ozep had turned up at Police Headquarters, introduced himself as a former officer in the Polish army, now a teacher of gymnastics in Paris. He said he'd jumped off the Pont d'Austerlitz into the Seine to kill himself, but the police from the River Squad pulled him out. [1937-38-sta]

The taxi drew up to Police Headquarters and M got out. [1937-38-eto]

M took his favorite attitude, in which Headquarters [Police Headquarters] at the Quai des Orfèvres had so often seen him, pipe between his teeth, back to the fire, hands clasped behind his back, with that indefinable air of stubbornness... [1937-38-man]

When Mme M said they'd called three times, M said "From the House [la Maison]?", what he and his colleagues sometimes called Police Headquarters [Police Judiciaire]. [1939-MAJ]

M arrived at the Gare d'Orsay, then his apartment on the Boulevard Richard-Lenoir. He changed buses at the stop nearest to Police Headquarters, and from there he could see the window that had once been his. [1940-JUG]

On the enormous map of Paris that covered a large part of the wall, a small white disk lighted up. The roar of the traffic on the Île de la Cité penetrated this room, that was the brain of the Police Emergency Center. Below, in the courtyard of Police Headquarters... [1941-SIG]

If M hadn't come, Jacques Pétillon would have climbed the dusty stairs of Police Headquarters... [1942-FEL]

The corridor of Police Headquarters was a long empty stretch of sunlit greyness. [1945-pip]

This was all so different from his surroundings at Police Headquarters in Paris.... M called Police Headquarters in Paris, asked for Lucas and got Torrence. Asked to speak to Janvier, to have him see if anyone had come for letters at the poste restante for Émile Duffieux. [1947-VAC]

M gave orders for one of the Police Headquarters cars to be kept at his disposal, left in the courtyard of the Quai des Orfèvres.... Messengers were rushing from the Hotels Section to the Vice Squad, and from there to Police Headquarters. [1947-MOR]

He would later have a similar stove at the Quai des Orfèvres, and when the central heating was installed at Police Headquarters, Chief-Divisional-Inspector Maigret, chief of the special squad, would manage to have it kept in his office.... M didn't know that 22 years later, he would meet Lise Gendreau-Balthazar again, and it would not be called the Sûreté, but Paris Police Headquarters [1948-PRE]

Pyke already knew all the departments of Police Headquarters, which he had been shown around. [1949-AMI]

M answered the call from the Chief of Police Headquarters. [1949-DAM]

M had ceased to realize, after so many years, that when he arrived at the top of the steep, dusty staircase at Police Headquarters, always slightly out of breath, he would make a brief pause and glance automatically at the glass cage which served as a waiting room, konwn to some of his colleagues as "the aquarium", to others as "Purgatory".... M had been wrong to use 'tu" to Thérèse. Louis Paumelle had noticed and frowned. Officials at Police Headquarters usually speak like that to women of her type. [1953-ECO]

When something big happened, the men in the Exchange would notify Police Headquarters. [1954-JEU]

Victor Cadet lived in the Rue du Chemin-Vert, not far from Police Headquarters. [1955-COR]

He hurried into the arched, drafty entrance of Police Headquarters. [1958-TEM]

M said his investigation had the consent of the Director of Police Headquarters. The Public Prosecutor's office had not been informed, and he had only mentioned it to the Examining Magistrate in passing. He was not acting on his instructions, nor on those of the Attorney General. [1959-ASS]

Climbing the stairs at Police Headquarters as a divisional chief-inspector seemed strange to him. [1960-VIE]

Saint-Hubert said he'd notified the District Attorney [Parquet] and Police Headquarters [PJ]. [1961-BRA]

At the bar of the Brasserie Dauphine he saw at least a dozen men from Police Headquarters who had scarcely more work than he had. [1962-COL]

François Paré said he appreciated not being called down to Police Headquarters. [1968-ENF]

Police Headqurters. All he could see himself was the massive entrance to Police Headquarters with a constable on duty, the yard with its little black cars, and the windows, one of which was his office. [1956-AMU]

Police Infirmary. M had Janvier come up to François Lagrange's room, to take Lagrange to the Police Infirmary. [1952-REV]

Police Judiciaire. One of the clerks had written "Affaire Heurtin" in beautiful writing on the folder. [1930-31-TET]

The University of Nancy had requested that a member of the Police Judiciaire be present in Delfzijl. [1931-HOL]

M told Marcel Basso they'd keep him at Police Judiciaire and then turn him over to the Sûrété later on.... The three men were left in the special cell of the Police Judiciaire, James, M and Marcel Basso. [1931-GUI]

Anna Peeters had brought a letter to the Police Judiciaire, which M had recognized from the writing as being from Mme M's cousin in Nancy. [1932-FLA]

M introduced himself to the mayor, Ernest Grandmaison: "Inspector Maigret, Police Judiciaire." [1932-POR]

M received a letter from Leduc, an old friend who had retired two years earlier from the Police Judiciaire, to settle down to country life in Dordogne. [1932-FOU]

Inspector of the Police Judiciaire. A rotten job, and that's all there was to say about it! [1932-LIB]

M told the maid he was from the Police Judiciaire. [1933-ECL]

A chance visitor to Marina's wouldn't have suspected that the thickset man in the heavy overcoat was Superintendent Maigret of the Police Judiciaire. [1936-pig]

The PJ had suggested that M look into the group of Poles in the Saint-Antoine district.... The Director of the Police Judiciaire got out of his car and asked Lucas where M was. M scarcely noticed the arrival of his Chief. [1937-38-sta]

M had almost ceased to belong to the Police Judiciaire. In 2 more days he would have officially retired. He had spent 30 years in the office in the Quai des Orfèvres. Now he was counting the hours, dreaming constantly of the house on the banks of the Loire, where Mme M was already fixing things up for his arrival. [1937-38-eto]

The girl [Berthe] wrote that she was the niece of a man who was for a long time his colleague in the Police Judiciaire, and who died by his side shortly before M's retirement..... M called Police Judiciaire and asked for his nephew, Jérôme Lacroix, and told him to meet him at the Zanzi-Bar on the Rue Caulaincourt. [1937-38-ber]

M. Motte said he knew M didn't leave the Police Judiciaire and set up as a private detective.... M realized that the theft of the ivories could have a stronger emotional significance than a violent crime at the Police Judiciaire. [1937-38-not]

For no reason M's mind suddenly went to the recent amalgamation of the Police Judiciaire and the Sûreté Générale, with its attendant disruption which... had caused him to be shunted off to Luçon. [1940-JUG]

The glass door which provided direct access between the Police Judiciaire headquarters and the Palais de Justice and the Archives. On the right a staircase leading to the attics which housed Police Records and the Forensic Laboratory. [1940-CEC]

M walked heavily up the stairs of the Police Judiciaire. François, the receptionist, pounced on him before he could reach his office.... M asked the Police Judiciaire receptionist to bring him 2 beers. [1941-SIG]

On being asked of M's methods by a visiting criminologist, the Chief Commissioner of the Police Judiciaire had sad, "He settles into a case like an old pair of slippers." [1942-FEL]

M recognized a pale face, Old Cadaver, Justin Cavre, who'd been called that at Police Judiciaire for 20 years... Only at this point, and for the first time since he had become involved in the case, did he play Maigret, as was said of inspecotrs at the Police Judiciaire who tried to imitate the great man. [1943-CAD]

M's temples were grayer, he was somewhat calmer and heavier, but he didn't feel he'd grown any older since leaving the Police Judiciaire. [1945-FAC]

M told the Chief of the Police Judiciaire they'd see what would come of it, but it was finally a waiter from the Boulevard Saint-Germain who gave them the link to Théodore Ballard. [1946-pau]

M overheard one of the newsmen looking over the passenger list, "Hey, that's the same name as the famous inspector of the Police Judiciaire." [1946-NEW]

Alfonsi had been attached to the Police Judiciaire, but not M's department. For a few years had been in Vice Squad. [1949-MME]

Nowadays everyone knows what's involved in conferences in the Police Judiciaire, but in those days most Parisians would have been hard put to even say which government service was located in the Quai des Orfèvres.... Jacquemain walked with him to the Palais de Justice, the Police Judiciaire, and that night, walking up and down the Seine, talked about his job as a police inspector. [1950-MEM]

The Police Judiciaire had procured a list of all the passengers who had arrived at Le Havre and Cherbourg in the past few weeks. [1951-LOG]

Of all the officers at the Police Judiciaire, Janvier looked least like a policeman. [1953-TRO]

As a young policeman, newly appointed to the Police Judiciaire, which Parisiens still called the Sûreté, M had belong to the Public Highways Squad, and walked the streets of Paris from morning to night. [1962-CLO]

Roland Blutet.... M's first reaction was to go to the chief of the Police Judiciaire. [1964-DEF]

M had found a summons from the Chief of Police on his arrival at the Police Judiciaire, and as he went to the Boulevard du Palais, he wondered what it meant. He told M the Head of the PJ was retiring next month after 12 years, and he and the Minister of the Interior agreed to offer M the post. [1972-CHA]

Police Judiciaire. Police Commissioner was attending a foreign press dinner at a big hotel on Avenue Montaigne when thehead of Police Judiciaire got through to him with the newsabout André Delteil. [1952-REV]

policemen. see Maigret and his collaborators (Maigret et ses collaborateurs ) by Murielle Wenger

Police Pathological Department. Sophie Ricain's father, M. Le Gal, came to M's office. M told him the body was in the Police Pathological Department, near the Pont d'Austerlitz. [1966-VOL]

Police Records. The glass door which provided direct access between the Police Judiciaire headquarters and the Palais de Justice and the Archives. On the right a staircase leading to the attics which housed Police Records and the Forensic Laboratory. [1940-CEC]

Police-Secours. M got a call from Police-Secours (le central de Police-Secours) that a Countess von Farnheim had been found strangled in Rue Victor-Massé. [1950-PIC]

Poliensky, Victor. From his red trade union card, the dead man was Victor Poliensky, Czech nationality, a worker at the Citroën factory. His address was 132 Quai de Javel. [1947-MOR]

Poliet et Chausson. Émile Ducrau looked out the window and said they were letting one of the Poliet et Chausson tugs run them aground. [1933-ECL]

Polin, Line. Line Marcia's maiden name was Line Polin. [1971-IND]

Polintskaïa, Stéphanie. At 18 Stéphanie Polintskaïa was already known to the Warsaw police. She had been married to Michael Ozep, and cut the throat of their child. Known in her group as Stan. [1937-38-sta]

Polish. Mlle. Pauline, Polish. The third roomer at the Émile Chabot's, along with the Polish student and Bogdanowsky. [1931-GAI]

There had been a case in the town of a Polish workman... [1932-FLA]

Lucas said he was working on a case in the Rue Saint-Antoine, a Polish chap who'd been up to some queer tricks. [1934-MAI]

Mme. Irvitch was talking in Polish to Adolphe Bonvoisin. [1936-arr]

Mme M said in the shops they spoke many languages, Italian, Hungarian, Polish... Rita had seemed to understand what they were saying. [1937-38-amo]

The thin, red-headed man with the sad eyes [Michael Ozep] who sat down next to M had a pronounced Polish accent.... One of the newspapers had mentioned the case -- that the Polish gangsters, including Stan the Killer, are at present in Paris. [1937-38-sta]

Germaine Devon started speaking in a language which was no longer English, but Polish or Russian.... M. Saft, a very distinguished Polish young man in Suite 133, requested a wake-up call at four a.m., and left the Excelsior at five to take the plane to London." [1938-owe]

They'd passed [Stephan Strevzki's] photo around in Polish and Russian circles with no result. [1939-hom]

As a few Poles were living in the area, and no Czechs, some people talked about a "Polish gang".... [1947-MOR]

Frans Steuvels said he'd had a suit made a few years earlier by a neighbor, a Polish Jew, who'd since disappeared, perhaps gone to America. [1949-MME]

M knew a Polish woman, who shared a hotel room on Rue Saint-Antoine with five men, whom she used to send out on robberies, rewarding those who were successful in her own fashion. [1950-MEM]

Saft, one of the boarders at Mlle. Clément's. Wife French, husband Polish. [1951-MEU]

Maria Smelker, a Polish woman with 5 children who worked as a char, found Léonie Birard's body. She'd come to the village at 16, as a farm servant, never married. [1953-ECO]

Hans Ziegler spoke fluent French, English, German, Dutch, Italian, Spanish, and a little Polish.... The letter to Louise Laboine from her father told he to go to Brooklyn and look up a Polish tailor who name was Lukasek, 1214 37th St. [1954-JEU]

The second tailor Lapointe saw was Polish, on the Rue Vaneau. [1955-TEN]

Mme. Kruger phoned Dr Pardon during the dinner. Husband a kind of tailor in the Rue Popincourt above an herbalist's, a Polish Jew. [1959-CON]

Polizei Proesidium. [Bremen] M set off towards the Polizei Proesidium. Some policemen, stripped to the waist, were doing PT in a yard. [1930-31-PHO]

Polyte. Didine [Adine Hulot] said someone could probably have gotten some fish from Polyte, a good sole or a plump Saint-Pierre. And old Père Rouillon went out with his gun, so you might get some plovers from him. [1940-JUG]

An inspector told Mansuy they'd kept Polyte for him, and that the Sub-Prefect had called. [1947-VAC]

A Morin, with a green boat; in the summer took tourists round the island; did his service in the navy. Often accompanied the major to Toulon. Polyte started a fight with Philippe de Moricourt the night before at the Arche de Noé, punched him in the face. (at M's instigation, to see de Moricourt's reaction) [1949-AMI]

Polytechnique. Daniélou came of a well-known family at Toulouse, and on the insistence of his parents he'd gone to the Polytechnique, but had opted for the constabulary and read law for two years. [1953-ECO]

Pomel, Raymond. One day Robert Bureau had seen the girl he loved, Renée, about 13, and a boy Raymond Pomel, the pork butcher's son, making love in the bushes. Afterwards he'd killed the boy with the Swedish knife he'd stolen from his uncle. [1969-TUE]

Pommeraye, Germain, La. see: La Pommeraye, Germain Germain La Pommeraye, notary at Versailles arrived in a big, chauffeur-driven car. [1937-38-noy]

Pommeraye, Viviane, La. see: La Pommeraye, Viviane Germain La Pommeraye's daughter, Viviane, 17, looked like 20, he said. [1937-38-noy]

Pommeret, Arthur, Le. see: Le Pommeret, Arthur

Pommeret, Yves Le. see: Le Pommeret, Yves

Pommeret, Yves, Le. see: Le Pommeret, Yves

Pommeroy. Dr. Mme. Parendon's doctor. Lived on Boulevard Haussmann. Had prescribed sleeping pills for her. [1968-HES]

Pompadour. Fernand Barillard said if M checked the records he'd merely find orders for so many Pompadour boxes... [1965-PAT]

Pompadour. The armchair in Mirella Jonker's bedroom had once belonged to Madame Pompadour. [1963-FAN]

Pompe, Rue de la. [Paris. 16e, Passy. from Avenue de la Muette to Avenue Bugeaud]

Stephan Strevzki lived in a 12,000-franc flat in Passy, 17 Rue de la Pompe. [1939-hom]

Alain Mazeron's wife lived at 23, Rue de la Pompe, Passy. [1960-VIE]

The second time M had dealt with Honoré Cuendet was a big jewel robbery in the Rue de la Pompe, in Passy. [1961-PAR]

Baron reported that he'd checked the Madeleine Theater. The two seats had been occupied. Behind were the Demailles, Rue de la Pompe in Passy. He'd question them. [1961-BRA]

Pomponne. Jean-Claude Ternel had gone with Marinette Augier to Félix et Félicie at Pomponne, on the Marne, not far from Lagny, which she especially liked. [1963-FAN]

Pont-au-Change. M circled the Palais de Justice, passed under the big clock, and crossed the Pont-au-Change. A few minutes later he was waiting for his bus in Place du Châtelet. [1962-CLI]

It was not until M was crossing the Pont-au-Change, and was in sight of the Palais de Justice, that he realized why he was uneasy. [1963-FAN]

Pont d'Avroy, Rue de. (Liège.)

Rue de Pont d'Avroy was at the end of the alley from the back door of the Gai-Moulin. Well-lighted, not altogether deserted when Jean Chabot and René Delfosse ran from the club.... It was the traditional thing to do in Liège in the evening, a stroll along Rue de Pont d'Avroy. [1931-GAI]

Pont-de-Flandre. 11 pm. A call from the Police Emergency Center, across the street, in the building of the municipal police, where all calls are inscribed on an illuminated board the length of the wall. The Pont-de-Flandre station has just heard there's been trouble in a bar on Rue de Crimée. [1950-MEM]

Pont de Saint-Cloud. After dinner M called PJ's general information. A corpse had been found in the Seine at Pont de Saint-Cloud. [1962-CLI]

Pont du Brault. Marcel Airaud had been seen in his boat, moving out into the bay in the direction of Pont du Brault. [1940-JUG]

Pont du Grau, Le. see: Le Pont du Grau Frédéric Michaux, better known as Fred the Boxer, was the landlord of the inn Le Pont du Grau, in La Mulatière. Miles from the nearest village, in the middle of the marshes of La Vendée. [1939-ven]

Pont du Las. M suggested that Charlot return to Pont du Las. [1949-AMI]

Pontfarcy. The landlord of the Vieux Calvados announced that he came from Pontfarcy, not far from Vire. [1948-PRE]

Ponthieu, Rue. M went to see Daunard in his hotel room on Rue Ponthieu. [1959-CON]

Ponthieu, Rue de. [Paris. 8e, Élycée. from Avenue Matignon to Rue de Berri]

M had the taxi take him to the Majestic Hotel, tradesmen's entrance, on the Rue de Ponthieu. [1929-30-LET]

Every day Justin Colleboeuf went to a little bar on Rue de Ponthieu.... Prosper Donge turned up Rue de Berri, then Rue de Ponthieu. A small café was open. Two houses further along, a door passers-by never noticed, the service entrance of the hotel, the Majestic. [1939-MAJ]

André Delteil's brother, Pierre Delteil, lived near the Étoile, at a furnished room on the Rue Ponthieu. [1952-REV]

Maurice Labat had a wife, children, and a mistress in an apartment on the Rue de Ponthieu, who was 20 years younger than he was. [1954-MIN]

Priollet had learned that Jeanine Armenieu had lived for some time in the Rue de Ponthieu, near the corner of the Rue de Berri, above a bar. M thought the Rue de Ponthieu was like the wings, or back stairs of the Champs-Élysées. Evey main street of Paris was partnered in this way by a narrow, lively street, usually running parallel to it, where there are small bars and provision shops, restaurants for drivers, cheap hotels, barber shops, and every kind of small trader's. [1954-JEU]

Sergeant Marchal wrote down the information, then called it in to Headquarters. There'd been a fight on the Rue de Ponthieu, as well.... Louise Paverini had called a hotel in the Rue de Ponthieu where Marco Paverini sometimes stayed when he had money. [1957-VOY]

Jacques. Véronique Lachaume's boyfriend was called Jacques Sainval, 44, 23 Rue de Ponthieu. His real name was Arthur Baquet. [1958-TEM]

Nicolas followed one of the men from the Café des Amis, Georges Macagne, to a garage in the Rue La Boétie. He left his car and walked to a house in the Rue de Ponthieu, parallel with the Champs-Élysées. [1961-PAR]

Rémond, who used several aliases, and was suspected of having pulled off swindles throughout Europe, lived in the Rue de Ponthieu. [1962-CLI]

Antonio Farano lived in the Rue de Ponthieu, married to an Italian girl. [1962-COL]

Fernand Courcel had stopped at a bar on the Rue de Ponthieu to place a bet on a horse. [1968-ENF]

One of Antoine Batille's tapes was the sounds of a supermarket on the Rue de Ponthieu. [1969-TUE]

Jo Mori's girlfriend was Marcelle Vanier, from Béziers. She'd been a barmaid on the Rue de Ponthieu previously. [1971-IND]

Nathalie Sabin-Levesque sometimes went to the Pickwick, an English pub in the Rue de Ponthieu. [1972-CHA]

Pontiac. On the last day the first witness was Angelino Pozzi, originally from Italy, a fruit and vegetable dealer, who had picked up the men in his Pontiac. [1949-CHE]

Philippe Jave had the big gray Pontiac at Cannes, which they'd driven down from Paris. [1956-AMU]

Torrence reported that Paulette Lachaume had a blue Pontiac. Her husband didn't drive, but Léonard Lachaume used it as much as she did. [1958-TEM]

Pont-Maguin. (Liège.)

Saint-Léonard Prison stood opposite Pont-Maguin. [1931-GAI]

Pont-Michel. During the morning meeting M idly contemplated the Seine and the passers-by on the Pont-Michel. [1954-MIN]

Pont Neuf. [Paris. 1er, Louvre. from Quai de la Mégisserie to Quai Grands Augustins]

At the Pont Neuf they passed the car bring in Torrence and Tony Cicero. [1951-LOG]

Pont-Neuf. They passed the Lion of Belfort, drove along the Boulevard Raspail, and over the Pont-Neuf. [1934-MAI]

Pont-Neuf. [Paris. 1er, Louvre. from Quai de la Mégisserie to Quai Grands Augustins]

Émile Ducrau asked M if he knew the Tabac Henri IV, in the middle of Pont-Neuf, not far from the Police Judiciaire. He said it was a kind of freighter's bourse. [1933-ECL]

M considered ordering sandwiches from the Brasserie Dauphine but decided to go to the little bar opposite the statue of Henri IV, in the middle of Pont-Neuf, where he ordered a ham sandwich. A game of belote was in progress at a table near the bar. [1940-CEC]

The Belle Jardinière had just shut, and all the shoppers and clerks were streaming out. They were crossing the Pont-Neuf... Joseph Mascouvin jumped off the bridge as Lucas was walking with him to Rue des Pyramides. [1941-SIG]

Francine Tremblet had always arranged to meet her father on the banks of the Seine, near the Pont-Neuf or the Pont des Arts. [1946-pau]

M and Lucas took a taxi, rather than waiting for a bus on the other side of Pont-Neuf, to the Cadran, Rue de Maubeuge. [1947-MOR]

Hubert Balthazar was Hector Balthazar's son, a good-for-nothing. He lived on the quays, not far from the Pont-Neuf, a kind of artist. [1948-PRE]

In the evenings Fernande Steuvals and Frans Steuvels would go for a walk in the Rue des Francs-Bourgeois neighborhood, or on the Île Saint-Louis, or for dinner at a little restaurant near the Pont-Neuf.... Once a week in summer, once a fortnight in winter, on Monday afternoons, Fernande Steuvals did her laundry on a laundry boat in the Seine, at Place du Vert-Galant, just below Pont-Neuf. [1949-MME]

One day as M crossed the Pont-Neuf he saw the Ostrogoth, whose christening had lasted 3 rowdy days. [1950-MEM]

Lourtie and M walked together part of the way, crossed the Pont-Neuf, Rue de Rivoli, where M found a taxi to go back to the Boulevard Richard-Lenoir. [1952-REV]

Back in his office he found Lucas waiting, and they walked to the bank on the Rue de Rivoli, crossing Pont-Neuf. Short-legged Lucas was obliged to take many steps to keep up with him. [1953-ECO]

Ernest had delivered his message, for M saw him head off towards Pont-Neuf. [1956-AMU]

M had once said to Janvier, one night when they were crossing Pont-Neuf returning to the Quai des Orfèvres, that the most frustrating cases are often the ones that start out seeming run-of-the-mill. [1957-VOY]

When Xavier Marton came out of the Quai des Orfèvres looking for Jenny, he first looked in the direction of Pont-Neuf. When he found her she pulled him in the direction of Pont Saint-Michel. [1957-SCR]

Léa said she'd known Doc (François Keller) when he slept under the Pont-Neuf, and before that in the Quai de Bercy. [1962-CLO]

Léon Florentin started off towards the Pont-Neuf, walked along the Quai de la Mégisserie, and suddenly jumped up on the parapet and into the Seine. [1968-ENF]

After inspecting the officers on duty at Police Headquarters, Léontine Antoine made off in the direction of Pont-Neuf. [1970-FOL]

Pontoise. [commune, N France, capital, Val-d'Oise dept. pop. 1968: 17,509. on Oise river 18 mi. NNW of Paris.]

Germain Cageot was born in Pontoise. [1934-MAI]

Ponts-et-Chaussées. A special map was brought out, used by Ponts-et-Chaussées, which showed all the construction going on on the roads. [1931-GUI]

News had just come in to the Café des Mariniers from Ponts-et-Chaussées that the river was open down to Maestricht. [1932-FLA]

Poor Man's Doctor, The. Mme. Keller tried to remember a book, either "The #Poor Man's Doctor" or "The Country Doctor"... [1962-CLO]

Popaul. The proprieter of the little bar on the corner of Rue des Récollets. Tubby little man. [1955-COR]

An anonymous letter said Popaul could be found in the Bar de la Lune on the Rue de Charonne. Said Christine Josset had met Popaul several times at a boarding house near the Saint-Martin Canal. Had bought him a little car, a quatre-chevaux, but he still beat her up from time to time. M never found him.... A sailor who spent a lot of time commuting to South America and Central America on cargo boats offered some information to M about Popaul, who'd used to hang out in the Bastille district. Said he'd met him in Venezuela and he'd claimed he'd killed Christine Josset. [1959-CON]

Popaul Vinchon. See: Vinchon, Popaul [1936-arr]

Pope. He wasn't the Pope: anybody could talk to him. Why the note? [1947-VAC]

Pope Joan. That evening, M, his wife, and brother- and sister-in-law all played Pope Joan, but since Mme M was a poor card-player, she made numerous mistakes... [1931-OMB]

Pope-Joan. [Pope-Joan. A card game resembling Michigan and fan-tan, using a regular deck, but a special round board with eight compartments. Maigret played the game with his brother- and sister-in-law and Mme Maigret at the very end of L'Ombre Chinoise (Maigret Mystified).]
Françoise Paget said there was a Pope-Joan, but she didn't know if it was complete. [1942-men]

Popeye. Léonard Planchon's nickname in the café in Place des Abbesses, where they hadn't known his read name. [1962-CLI]

Popincourt, Rue. [Paris. 11e, Popincourt. from Rue de la Roquette to Boulevard Voltaire]

François Lagrange lived in the Rue Popincourt, a few yards from Dr Pardons. M went by taxi to see Lagrange at Rue Popincourt. Third on the left, far side of the courtyard. 6-story building that faced the street, 3-story building on the far side of the courtyard. Yellowish plastered house front. [1952-REV]

Mme. Kruger in the Rue Popincourt above an herbalist's, phoned Dr Pardon during the dinner. [1959-CON]

Only to his old friend Dr Pardon, who lived in the Rue Popincourt, did he sometimes mutter something that might be considered confidential. A few weeks before he'd spoken bitterly on the Penal Code - the real job of the police was to protect the State... last of all the lives of the citizens. Article 274, on mendicancy comes before Article 295 on wilful homicide. [1961-PAR]

It was in the Rue Popincourt, several hundred yards from the Boulevard Richard-Lenoir, at Dr Pardon's house, where M had for years been dining once a month. [1964-DEF]

Gino Pagliati came to Dr Pardon's to say he'd found a wounded man on the Rue Popincourt, a hundred yards away. His small grocery store was on the corner of Rue du Chemin-Vert and the Rue Popincourt. [1969-TUE]

Popineau. Francis Decoin lived with Mme. Popineau, who they called La Popine. She had a pretty shop on the corner of the Rue de la République. [1947-VAC]

Popine, La. see: La Popine Francis Decoin lived with Mme. Popineau, who they called La Popine. She had a pretty shop on the corner of the Rue de la République.... La Popine said the cooper's daughter was probably older than 14 or 15, "already well developed... nice little full breasts." [1947-VAC]

Popinga, Conrad. Jean Duclos, a professor at the University of Nancy had been a guest of Conrad Popinga at Delfzijl, and Popinga had been murdered. 42, formerly a captain in the merchant service, taught cadets on the training ship at Delfzijl. Married, no children. Spoke English and German fluently, fairly good French. [1931-HOL]

Popinga, Liesbeth. Conrad Popinga's wife, daughter of the headmaster of a lycée in Amsterdam. Good French. [1931-HOL]

Poré. Germaine Laboine received a letter from Mlle. Poré, living in the Rue du Chemin-Vert, who said she'd do well to keep an eye on her daughter. Mlle. Poré, who lived next to Lucien's wife's herb shop, was Jeanine Armenieu's aunt. Worked at the telephone exchange. [1954-JEU]

Porquerolles. [A small island in the Mediterranean, off Hyères and Toulon. (Côte d'Azur)]

Willy Marco said they were on their way to the Mediterranean, to the island of Porquerolles, opposite Hyères, where they spent the greater part of the year. The colonel had bought an old fort there, the Petit Langoustier.... Once during the Porquerolles festival there'd been a regular orgy at the Petit Langoustier that went on for a week. Mary Lampson disappeared on the third day and they found her at an inn at Grien. [1930-PRO]

Scene of the murder of Marcellin and the investigation. Porquerolles was "supposed to be as beautiful as Capri and the Greek isles." About three miles from Giens Point to Porquerolles. ...peaks, bays, ancient fortresses in the greenery, a group of light-colored houses and the white church tower in the middle. The harbor was tiny, jetty on the left, rocky promontory covered with sea pines on the right; palm trees, mimosas and tamarisks. The square was vast and deserted, enclosed by eucalyptus trees and colored houses, little yellow church with a white tower. several cafés with shaded terraces. (There was hardly any crime: A woman from the north, 4 or 5 years ago, tried suicide with pills. An Italian sailor stabbed Baptiste in the arm...). Unnamed residents include the page from the Grand Hotel, the porter with the uniform cap, the priest, who M hadn't seen, the young married couple, the butcher, the postman, the doctor, very ill, a bachelor, settled on the island to cure himself. [1949-AMI]

On the few occasions M had traveled on summer vacations it had been to meet Georges Simenon at his various homes, while he was still living in France: in Alsace, at Porquerolles, in the Charentes, the Vendée, etc. And when M had gone on a semi-official tour of the US, it was mainly since he knew he'd meet him in Arizona, where he'd been living. [1950-MEM]

M told Lecoeur he used to plays bowls a bit years ago at Porquerolles. [1967-VIC]

M reminded Marella that it had been 10 or 12 years since they'd met, "over that business at Porquerolles." [see: AMI. (Marella does not appear in AMI.)] [1970-FOL]

Port-en-Bessin. [fishing village, NW France, Calvados dept. pop. 1962: 1,737. about 5 mi. N of Bayeux on shore of Bay of the Seine.]

Julie Legrand was born in Port-en-Bressin. [1932-POR]

porter. The old porter had come into his office at the Quai des Orfèvres with the black edged visiting card: Mme. Veuve Ferdinand Besson, La Bicoque, Étretat. [1949-DAM]

The phone rang. It was the voice of the old office clerk upstairs, who had been in his job nearly 50 years. [1950-MEM]

Port, Hôtel du. see: Hôtel du Port

Port, Hôtel du. see: Hôtel du Port

Portland. Someone called the mayor at La Ferté-Alais to see if Portland cement might have been spilled on any of the nearby roads. [1931-GUI]

Port-Marchand. Marella told M that Le Grand Marcel had spent the night whooping it up with his buddies at the Restaurant Victor, opposite the Port-Marchand.. [1970-FOL]

Port Said. Eugène Labri was not an old offender. He was a Frenchman, born in Cairo or Port Said, about 45, fat, with dark brilliant eyes, obsequious. [1936-err]

Portugal. Julien Foucrier had lived in Spain, Portugal, and then Panama for fifteen, on the run for killing Mabille. [1951-MEU]

Some of Isabelle de V--'s letters were from Tyrol, a good many from Switzerland and Portugal. [1960-VIE]

Portuguese. It is generally known that there is one squad solely concerned with the 2-300,000 North Africans, Portuguese and others who live on the outskirts of the 20th, who camp there, scarcely knowing the language if at all. [1950-MEM]

Poste. Castaing said while they were in the bar at the "Poste" Théo Besson had had a phone call. [1949-DAM]

Poste, Café de la. see: Café de la Poste

Poste, Hôtel de la. see: Hôtel de la Poste

Poste Parisien. The famous gala programme of Poste Parisien - the same tune was being heard everywhere that night on the radio. [1946-mal]

Post Office Savings. Léontine Antoine had a Post Office Savings account. [1970-FOL]

pot. Billy Louette said when they told the customers they didn't smoke pot or hash they were disappointed. [1970-FOL]

Pot-au-Noir, Rue du. [Liège] The body hanging from the door-knocker was Émile Klein, 20-year-old house painter, born in Angleur, living in the Rue du Pot-au-Noir. He'd apparently hanged himself in the middle of the night with a sash-cord. [1930-31-PHO]

Pot d'Or, Rue. (Liège.)

(Liège.)

The front door of the Gai-Moulin, used by customers, opened onto the Rue Pot d'Or. [1931-GAI]

Poteaux, Route des. The body was discovered in the Bois de Boulogne, Route des Poteaux, a turning off the Avenue Fortunée, not far from the Porte Dauphine. A middle-aged man... [1961-PAR]

Potier, Urban. One of Jean-Charles Gaillard's cases was Urban Potier, receiving, one month in prison, stay of execution. Lucas had been in charge of the case. He kept a junk-shop on the Boulevard de la Chapelle. [1962-COL]

Potru. M asked the driver of the butcher's truck to drop him at the Potru sisters' house, opposite the church. [1936-lar]

Potru, Amélie. Amélie Potru, 65, was found lying in a pool of blood with eleven stab wounds, none serious. [1936-lar]

Potru, Marcel. Three days after a visit from the Public Prosecutors of Orléans, Marcel Potru, the son of Marguerite Potru, 39 was arrested. He was a woodcutter in the forest and lived in a ruined farm 10 km away, close to the Loup-Pendu pond. [1936-lar]

Potru, Marguerite. Marguerite Potru, 62, was found dead in her bed, three stab wounds in her chest. [1936-lar]

Potsi Siveschi. see: Siveschi, Potsi

Potteret. Colombani checked the flights. 315 for London; Stuttgart; Cairo, Beirut... P Potteret; New York by Pan American, Pittsburg... Piroulet... no Louise Paverini. [1957-VOY]

Potut. On the vast, pedimented depot was written Catoire & Potut, Metals, familiar words to M, since he had looked down on it every day for more than 30 years. [1956-AMU]

Potut. Arlette's aunt said she knew someone in Caen who'd seen Arlette going in to Dr. Potut's, the delivery doctor. [1950-PIC]

Pougues-les-Eaux. [commune, C France, Nièvre dept. pop. 1959: 1,640. Nevers arr.]

A new tenant at the Place Constantin-Pecquer had convinced Mme. Lognon to try the cure at Pougues-les-Eaux. While she was gone Lognon wore a straw hat and red tie, and almost a smile. [1955-TEN]

Pouilly. The waiter at the Hôtel du Commerce who had served the young man seen quarreling with Émile Gallet was on holiday in Pouilly, 12 miles away. [1930-GAL]

Pouilly-sur-Loire. Richard Gendreau-Balthazar said his sister, Lise Gendreau-Balthazar, was at Anseval, the Château d'Anseval, near Pouilly-sur-Loire, in the Nièvre. [1948-PRE]

Poujolle, Henri. Valentine Besson's first husband had been Henri Poujolle, from Rouen, who worked in the Post Office. [1949-DAM]

Poupard. Maître Poupard, the criminal lawyer, was one of the leading lights of the Bar, married to a very rich American woman. They had a magnificent apartment on the Île Saint-Louis. [1969-VIN]

Pozzi. The owner of the Bar des Tilleuls said someone named Pozzi ran the club on the first floor. [1966-NAH]

Pozzi, Angelino. On the last day the first witness was Angelino Pozzi, originally from Italy, a fruit and vegetable dealer, who had picked up the men in his Pontiac. [1949-CHE]

Pozzo. Pozzo was short, almost bald, with prominent eyes, a nose as bulbous as Lognon's and a clown's flexible mouth. [1951-LOG]

Pozzo's. One of the desk clerks at the Hôtel Wagram thought Bill Larner often ate at Pozzo's on Rue des Acacias. [1951-LOG]

PA  PE  PH  PI  PJ  PL  PM  PN  PO  PR  PS  PT  PU  PY  

PR

PRA  PRE  PRI  PRO  PRU  

Prado. Jaquette Larrieu said she stayed in a room near the Prado when she was separated from Armand de Saint-Hilaire in Cuba for five months. [1960-VIE]

Prague. [City, capital of Czechoslovakia and Czech S.R. on both sides of the Vitava (Moldau) R. 115 mi. NW of Brno. pop. 1970: 1,078,096.]

The Head of the Criminal Police was in Prague for a technical Police Conference. [1930-GAL]

The interpreter [Franz Lehel] seemed relieved they she was a Slovak peasant, not a pure Czech from Prague, like himself.... The dossier said that Jean Bronsky, 35, had been born in Prague. [1947-MOR]

The Prague Police had circulated Hans Ziegler's photo. [1954-JEU]

Prange, Comtesse de. Mme. Parendon asked Julien Baud to call the Comtesse de Prange to say she'd be late. [1968-HES]

Prefect. Alban Groult-Cotelle said he'd been with the Prefect's private secretary, Pierre Musellier, who had an apartment on Place Napoléon, above the Murs garages, about 50 years from the Hôtel de l'Europe. [1943-CAD]

An inspector told Mansuy they'd kept Polyte for him, and that the Sub-Prefect had called. [1947-VAC]

M's report would be sent to the Prefect of Police, who would judge whether to send it to the Public Prosecutor.... Hadn't Maxime Le Bret approached the Prefect of Police or the Minister of the Interior? [1948-PRE]

M told Coméliau he'd gone to see the Prefect of Police and gotten permission to use volunteers from the women's section of the municipal police. [1955-TEN]

M's badge had the number 0004. Number 1 was the Prefect. [1966-VOL]

Pepito Giovanni said he was on the best of terms with all those in authority, from the Prefect downward. [1970-FOL]

Prefect. M asked Joseph if the Director was in, but he was in conference with the Prefect. [1957-SCR]

Prefecture. M held out his Prefecture of Police card. [1948-PRE]

Émile Boulay had a gun licensed by the Prefecture of Police. [1962-COL]

Préfecture. M reached Tarraud at the Préfecture. Told him to go to the Chief's place and have him come to meet M at the Majestic Hotel. An hour later the Director of the Criminal Investigation Department knocked at the door. [1929-30-LET]

The Black Maria drove out of the Préfecture about 2:00 and came back and unloaded its booty in the Dépôt yard. [1931-NUI]

Joseph said he'd just come from the Préfecture where he'd had his identity card renewed. Joseph Ambrosini, born at Milan. waiter. [1932-LIB]

M told the driver "The Préfecture". "At the Quai?" "No, the one at City Police Headquarters. [1952-BAN]

M had once overheard Lucas telling Janvier, then a newcomer to the Préfecture, "When he's in a brown study it doesn't necessarily mean he's in a bad temper. [1961-PAR]

M's first thought was that Jean Bauche had hanged himself in his cell at the Préfecture. [1963-FAN]

Prefecutre. Since Philippe Jave had left the Prefecture of Police, he had refused to see anyone. [1956-AMU]

Préjean. [Albert Prejean 1893-1979. A former WWI flying ace, Prejean is best known for playing heroes in the silent films of René Clair. Before entering the military, Prejean had worked as a nightclub entertainer and acrobat. His popularity in film began to wane after the advent of sound and he spent the rest of his career appearing in average-quality mainstream films.~ Sandra Brennan, All Movie Guide]
M felt the first screen Maigret, Pierre Renoir, was relatively true to life. But in Abel Tarride he'd become flabby and obese. Harry Baur may have been a great actor, but he was 20 years older! And with Préjean he suddenly got younger. Finally, lately, with Charles Laughton, he'd become stout again, and spoke English! At least Pierre Renoir hadn't worn a bowler. [1950-MEM]
 

Préjean, Auguste. Aurore Gallet's father, secretary of the last Bourbon prince, editor of the Legitimist paper Le Soleil. Died a year after her marriage. [1930-GAL]

Préjean, Aurore. Aurore Gallet's maiden name. [1930-GAL]

Premier. M and Janvier were lunching in a restaurant in the Rue de Bourgogne. They'd picked it on account of its terrace, and soon noticed it was patronized by ministry officials, especially from the Premier's department, and a few officers in mufti from the War Office. [1960-VIE]

Presbourg, Rue de. [Paris. 8e, Élycée - 16e, Passy. from Avenue Champs-Élysées to Avenue de la Grande-Armée]

Mme. Aubain-Vasconcelos lived in the Rue de Presbourg in one of those huge stone houses which have one facade overlooking the Place de l'Éoile. Her husband had been a State Councillor, and she'd had herself introduced by a Minister who had telephoned the Chief of Police Headquarters personally. She said her son-in-law, Gaston, hadn't been sleeping there for some time. [1947-MOR]

M happened to glance down the quiet Rue de Presbourg, and he saw Dédé's car. [1948-PRE]

The girl in Jean Destouches ' apartment had met him the night before in a bar on the Rue de Presbourg. [1965-PAT]

Presbyterian. M imagined that Harry Brown's house in Australia had been inhabited by grave people, looking like Presbyterian ministers. [1932-LIB]

President. On the walls were diagrams, announcements, and a portrait of the President of the Republic. [1931-REN]

The evening paper's reported that the President of the Republic had turned down the reprieve of Jean Lenoir, ringleader of the Belleville gang. He would be executed the next day. [1931-GUI]

It was April 15, 1913. That morning a foreign monarch had arrived at Longchamps Station, and the President of the Republic had been there to welcome him. [1948-PRE]

President of the Republic. M took the bus to Rond-Pont, and walked along Avenue Marigny, alongside the gardens of the Élysée Palace, the gardens of the President of the Republic. [1968-HES]

President of the State Council. Oscar Malterre, President of the Council, was also Minister of the Interior, and thus had Criminal Investigation Department in the palm of his hand.... Auguste Point told M he hadn't even informed the President of the State Council. [1954-MIN]

President-Wilson, Avenue. [Nice] Germaine Devon said Ernst Owen had told her to bring a letter to a certain address in Nice, 317 Avenue President-Wilson, which didn't exist. [1938-owe]

Presse. Intran [Intransigeant], Liberté, Presse, Paris Soir... Names of the papers called out by M. Jacob at his stall on the corner of Rue Clignancourt and Boulevard Rochechouart. [1930-GAL]

Presse, La. see: La Presse That evening La Presse reported that Louis Viaud, 56, the butler, from Anseval, Nièvre, had shot a burglar. [1948-PRE]

Presse Médicale, La. see: La Presse Médicale The books under the bridge included Verlaine's "Sagesse", Bossuet's "Oraisons Funèbres," the second half of Las Cases' "Memorial de Sainte-Hélène," and an old issue of "La Presse Médicale." [1962-CLO]

Pressyl. A considerable quantity of digitalis had been found in Éveline Jave's intestines. Prof. Loireau provided some comments. Rather than digitalis, he said, which for her was counter-indicated, she'd needed camphor or Pressyl, fashionable nowadays. [1956-AMU]

Pretty Emma. [La Belle Emma]. My found a letter to Emma from Léon Le Glérec, saying that the Quimper priest would bless his new boat, the Pretty Emma, next week. He'd make good money carrying onions to England, and they could get married. [1931-JAU]

Pretty Pigeon. Inn at Morsang [Morsang-sur-Seine], on the Seine by the barrage a little above Corbeil, run by Mme. Roy. [1941-SIG]

Prieur, Christophe. Jean-Baptiste Prieur's brother. Was married, had a daughter, lived in Morocco, committed suicide, wife disappeared, perhaps married an American living in Texas. Daughter was Nicole Prieur. [1964-DEF]

Prieur, Jean-Baptiste. Head of Petitions at the State Council. Lived at 42 Boulevard de Courcelles. Nicole Prieur's uncle. She lived with him.... M told Janvier to find out about Jean-Baptiste Prieur if he had time... Brilliant jurist, married, wife killed in a car accident 10 years earlier. Father was a shipowner at La Rochelle. [1964-DEF]

Prieur, Nicole. 17. 42 Boulevard de Courcelles. Her name was on the members list at the Hundred Keys Club, backed by Dr. François Mélan and Martine Bouet.... Went to lectures at the Sorbonne.... The Chief Commissioner asked M if he knew Mlle. Prieur. She'd reported to her uncle that M had attempted to molest her. ... Jean-Baptiste Prieur's brother, Christophe Prieur, was married, had a daughter, lived in Morocco, committed suicide, wife disappeared, perhaps married an American living in Texas. Daughter was Nicole Prieur. [1964-DEF]

Prijean. Maître Prijean was Jacqueline Rousselet's lawyer, Rue de Bassano. [1962-CLO]

Prince. [On February 20, 1934, the mangled body of Albert Prince was discovered on the railroad tracks in La Combe-aux-Fées, near Dijon. Prince, a court of appeals magistrate and chief of the financial division of the Seine prosecutor's office, had recently been assigned to draft a report on a man whose activities he had been following for several years: Alexandre Stavisky. ... the editor of Paris-Soir offered Simenon the chance to "play Maigret" and investigate the death (which he would be disappointed to discover was a suicide...) Assouline p.122]
Harry Cole reminded M of the case in France of a town council member named Prince found with a rope on his wrists on a railroad track. [1949-CHE]

Prince de Galles. Did the pharmacy have customers from the Hôtel George-V and the Price de Galles next door? [1957-VOY]

Princess Helen. see: Helen, Princess

Printemps. Mme M said it wasn't a hat from the Galeries Lafayette or the Printemps either.... Last Christmas the Grossots had received an order from Printemps for their toys. [1949-MME]

Printemps. Whether at Bon Marché, the Louvre or Printemps, the clientele was regular. [1950-MEM]

Priollet. Chief Inpector of the Vice Squad. The Caracci case should have been under his jurisdiction, but M was handling it as Priollet was in the Jura attending the funeral of a relative. [1949-AMI]

Various conversations, not all business: "How's your daughter, Priollet, her measles?" [1950-MEM]

Thérèse said Inspector Priollet would vouch that she hadn't taken the pocketbook, it was her friend Lucille. M remembered being called in to the office of the head of the "mondaine" section, the Vice Squad, and seeing the dark, touseled-haired girl, dabbing at her eyes. [1953-ECO]

M went down to the end of the passage, to Priollet's office, of the Society Division to check on Marco Santoni. [1954-JEU]

Prisunic. Francine Tremblet had been working for a year in a Prisunic in the Rue Réuamur, next to the Rue du Sentier, the same subway line. She'd probably traveled with her father. [1946-pau]

Prix de Diane. Francine Josselin said they hadn't been to Longchamp or Auteuil more than ten times in their lives. Her husband had once taken her to see the Prix de Diane at Chantilly. [1961-BRA]

Prix de Rome. Grossot was a sculptor who'd once won the Prix de Rome. [1949-MME]

Prohibition. One day in Sing Sing Léon Le Glérec had met an American from Brest, who'd been a Prohibition agent, in England, France, and Germany. [1931-JAU]

Promenade des Anglais. [Wide promenade of Nice, facing due south, bordering the Baie des Anges on the sea for its entire length.]

M scanned the horizon to Nice, where the Promenade des Anglais was just visible as a white line. [1932-LIB]

16 years earlier Stanley Hobson had been staying in Nice at one of the big hotels on the Promenade des Anglais. [1963-FAN]

M imagined that Germain Parendon was looking at the Promenade des Anglais and the blue waters of the Baie des Anges while he was speaking to him on the phone. [1968-HES]

Promenade des Anglais. [Nice] Julius Van Cram and Germaine Laboine lived in a flat off the Promenade des Anglais. [1954-JEU]

[Fr. ed. only] M said Palmieri, like the trees on the Promenade des Anglais, palmier, with an i. [1957-VOY]

Prony, Rue de. [Paris. 17e, Batignolles-Monceau. from Boulevard de Courcelles to Avenue de Villiers]

There was a servant's entrance in the Rue de Prony, a back door that used to be the tradesmen's entrance. [1956-ECH]

Prosecutor. The Deputy Prosecutor had decided the crime was a vendetta, committed in Montmartre, the body dumped there. [1961-PAR]

Oron, the Deputy Prosecutor [deputy officer in Hamilton], couldn't have been more than 30. [1972-CHA]

Prosecutor's Office. The Parquet (Prosecutor's Office) had already arrived. [1938-ceu]

Sometimes people, especially from the Prosecutor's Office, criticized M for doing the inspectors' work for them. [1966-VOL]

Prosper Donge. see: Donge, Prosper

Protestant. Beetje Liewens said of course everyone was Protestant, but Liesbeth Popinga belonged to the strictest sect of all. [1931-HOL]

Harry Brown had struck M more as a Protestant than a Catholic. [1932-LIB]

M. Louis, with his stern delivery, was sometimes reminiscent of a Protestant minister. [1938-owe]

Maître Ballu remembered that when he'd first met Amorelle, around the time of the Exposition of 1900, he'd asked him if he were connected to the Amorelles of Geneva, an old Protestant family. [1945-FAC]

Gilbert Négrel said perhaps it was the Protestant atmosphere at Nîmes which kept him from saying "tu" to many people. [1956-AMU]

Gérard Aubin was one of a group of powerful Protestant financiers. [1969-VIN]

Proud and Drouin. real estate agent on Boulevard Bonne-Nouvelle, where Joseph Mascouvin had worked for 15 years.... Since the Café des Sports was only a few steps from Boulevard Bonne-Nouvelle, M decided to visit Proud and Drouin. M. Proud had been dead for three years. Drouin was a mistrustful looking man in his fifties. [1941-SIG]

Prou, Gustave. Roger Prou's father, a carpenter, had lent Prou 10,000 f to buy out Léonard Planchon. [1962-CLI]

Prou, Roger. Roger Etienne Ferdinand Prou. 29. Born in Paris on Rue de la Roquette. M imagined that he could have been a pimp... not at the Étoile, but at Porte Saint-Denisor Bastille... or he could organize warehouse burglaries around Gare du Nord... Worked with his father, a carpenter, till he was 16. Wanted to be a professional bicycle racer. Not Tour de France, track. Raced two years as a junior in the Vélodrome d'Hiver. Worked for Desjardins and Brosse, Boulevard Rochechouart, in the painting-decorating business. Had been living alone at the end of Rue Lepic in the Hôtel Beauséjour.... Worked for Léonard Planchon, took up with his wife, and moved in, taking over Planchon's position in the company as well, for two years. With his wife, murdered Planchon, dumping the body in the Seine. [1962-CLI]

Proust, Marcel. Fernande Steuvals said Frans Steuvels was in the middle of rereading Marcel Proust all the way through while he was being held in Santé prison. [1949-MME]

Prouvaires, Rue des. [Paris. 1er, Louvre. from Rue Saint-Honoré to Rue Berger]

It was not far from Quai des Orfèvres to Superintendent Ascan's office in the police station in the First Arondissement, Rue des Prouvaires. [1971-SEU]

Provençal. Raoul Comitat said the Provençal furniture in Maurice Marcia's villa at Bandol was first class.... The dining room was in antique Provençal style. [1971-IND]

Provençal. There was nothing to be seen except a typical Provençal inn and several fisherman's cottages painted pink and pale blue. [1949-AMI]

Provençal, The. Harry Brown was staying in Juan-les-Pins at a big hotel, The Provençal. [1932-LIB]

Provence. [Historical region of SE France; bounded anciently on the N by Dauphiné E by countship of Nice; S by Mediterranean; W by Languedoc; NW by Comtat Venaissin.]

Émile Ducrau's son-in-law, Decharme, said if he gave him his share of the inheritance he'd settle in Provence. [1933-ECL]

Boissier came from Provence, would have been a Chief Inspector except that his handwriting and spelling kept him from passing the exams. [1951-GRA]

Past Montélimar, Gaston Meurant was discovering the atmosphere of Provence. [1959-ASS]

In the glove compartment of Oscar Chabut's red Jaguar were a Guide Michelin, two road maps of Provence, and a box of cough drops. [1969-VIN]

M took the night train to Toulon, awoke at dawn just as the train drew into Montélimar. To him it had always been the frontier town of Provence. From there on he couldn't bear to miss an inch of the landscape. He loved everything about it. [1970-FOL]

Provence, Rue de. [Paris. 8e, Élycée - 9e, Opéra. from Rue du Faubourg-Montmartre to Rue de Rome]

M had recognized the hard-of-hearing man [Colin] as the proprietor of a brothel in the Rue de Provence. [1934-MAI]

M sent some men to the Rue de Provence, opposite the Folies-Bergère. [1947-MOR]

Mickey Boubée asked M if he remembered Fat Louis, who owned the three brothels in the Rue de Provence. [1962-COL]

Provence, Rue de la. [Liège] Armand Lecocq d'Arneville said they'd lived in the Rue de la Provence, in Liège. [1930-31-PHO]

Providence. Jean Liberge, the carter from the Providence, a horse barge, told the lock-keeper his skipper wanted to get to Juvigny by the next night. [1930-PRO]

Prunier. The Prunier warehouse manager had complained that someone had been stealing his lobsters during the night. [1931-JAU]

Prussian. The officials wearing orange caps and those in Prussian blue or green meet and wait for the Customs formalities. [1930-31-PHO]

PA  PE  PH  PI  PJ  PL  PM  PN  PO  PR  PS  PT  PU  PY  

PS

PSK  

Pskov. [City, capital of Pskov Oblast, Russian SFSR, USSR, on Velikaya river near SE shore of Lake Pskov, 155 mi. SW of Leningrad. pop. 1970: 127,000.]

The photographer of the family scene M found in Anna Gorskin's room, K. Akel, Pskov.... Pskov was in Russia. M had looked it up in an atlas. Near the Baltic. Several little countries there, Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania, encircled by Poland and Russia.... and there Jews as well, scattered everywhere.... M said of the area of Pskov, some of the intelligentsia are in favor of German culture, others prefer Slav. Some of the peasants look like Lapps or Kalmuks... there's a whole mass of Jews and part-Jews, who eat garlic and slaughter their livestock differently from the rest. [1929-30-LET]

PA  PE  PH  PI  PJ  PL  PM  PN  PO  PR  PS  PT  PU  PY  

PT

PTI  

P'tit Louis. see: Louis, P'tit

M thought names like Bébert, P'tit Louis, and Grand Jules were common enough in his profession. [1967-VIC]

PA  PE  PH  PI  PJ  PL  PM  PN  PO  PR  PS  PT  PU  PY  

PU

PUB  PUE  PUG  PUI  PUL  PUN  PUR  PUT  

Public Highways Squad. As a young policeman, newly appointed to the Police Judiciaire, which Parisiens still called the Sûreté, M had belong to the Public Highways Squad, and walked the streets of Paris from morning to night. [1962-CLO]

Public Morals. Members of the Public Morals Squad still had the habit of playing a game of belote before thay started on a day's work. [1934-MAI]

Public Prosecution. The lock keeper of Le Coudray made no distinction between the policemen from Corbeil, M, the journalists, or the representatives of the Department of Public Prosecution. [1936-pen]

That Sunday had been All Saint's Day. Towards evening the officials of the Department of Public Prosecution made their way towards the Boulevard Beaumarchais. [1936-bea]

Public Prosecutions. The Chief said the Director of Prosecutions had put Judge Coméliau in charge of the preliminary investigations. [1947-MOR]

M had Lapointe call the Laboratory for Moers and his men to come to Léontine Antoine's, and to call Public Prosecutions. [1970-FOL]

Public Prosecutions. Afterwards, M heading for the little connecting door which led to the Dept. of Public Prosecutions, passing through the Examining Magistrate's wing. [1955-COR]

Public Prosecutor. Carl Anderson said the Public Prosecutor's had sealed the garage. [1931-NUI]

The lawyer was telling a story of a conversation he'd had with the Public Prosecutor at Bourges. [1932-FIA]

M told the policeman to call the Public Prosecutor at Caen. [1932-POR]

Outside, five men were waiting in the corridor, the Public Prosecutor of Bergerac, the Examining Magistrate and his clerk, an inspector, and a police pathologist. [1932-FOU]

Émile Ducrau said that when the Public Prosecutor had come the day before there'd been a bossy little chap of an Examining Magistrate with yellow gloves on, who'd looked as if he didn't want to get his hands dirty. [1933-ECL]

Two cars drew up in quick succession. The Public Prosecutor had arrived. [1934-MAI]

Three days after a visit from the Public Prosecutors of Orléans, Marcel Potru, the son of Marguerite Potru, 39 was arrested. He was a woodcutter in the forest and lived in a ruined farm 10 km away, close to the Loup-Pendu pond. [1936-lar]

The car from the Departmet of Public Prosecution arrived. [1937-38-amo]

A quarter of an hour later M was closeted with the Public Prosecutor of Caen. [1937-38-bay]

M left the local policeman to collect the data and receive the gentlemen from the DPP. [1937-38-eto]

The inspector said that tomorrow he'd have to deal with the Public Prosecutor's lot. [1937-38-man]

The visit from the Public Prosecutor's Office had been short, and the Examining Magistrate, Bonneau, had given M free hand, as usual.... M had the taxi take him to the Public Prosecutor's Office, Financial Section. [1939-MAJ]

Judge Forlacroix offered M an Armagnac, which he said an old friend, who had been the Public Prosecutor in Versailles, sends him from his estate in the Gers region. [1940-JUG]

Victor Bréjon had written to the Public Prosecutor at Fontenay-le-Comte, since Aubin [Saint-Aubin-les-Marais] comes under the jurisdiction of Fontenay.... Étienne Naud told Alban Groult-Cotelle he'd met the Public Prosecutor in Fontenay-le-Comte that morning, almost a relative of Alban's, since he'd married a Deharme, from Cholet. [1943-CAD]

Mansuy said he'd notified the Public Prosecutor at La Roche-sur-Yon. He'd insisted on notifying the Flying Squad at Poitiers. [1947-VAC]

M's report would be sent to the Prefect of Police, who would judge whether to send it to the Public Prosecutor. [1948-PRE]

M tried to get it straight. He said Mike O'Rourke's position was similar to his own, and the sheriff, over him, more or less like the director of the Judiciary Police, except that he's elected. And the Attorney was like the Public Prosecutor, while the deputies were like M's brigade chiefs and inspectors. [1949-CHE]

M told Janvier to wait for the Public Prosecutor [le Parquet] and the people from the Identité Judiciaire. [1950-PIC]

Lomel told M the Public Prosecutor was in his office, and that the night before he'd been in La Rochelle, where he'd gone by car. [1953-PEU]

M told Moers to wait before starting, and to call the Public Prosecutor. [1953-TRO]

M telephoned the Public Prosecutor's Office before breakfast. [1956-ECH]

The Public Prosecutor's Office had been apprised of the case. [1956-AMU]

M asked the desk for the Parquet, but she didn't understand, so he asked for the Public Prosecutor. [1957-VOY]

M had Lucas call the Public Prosecutor's office. Lachaume of Lachaume's Biscuits had been shot in the heart. He reminded him to call the Identity people as well. [1958-TEM]

M said his investigation had the consent of the Director of Police Headquarters. The Public Prosecutor's office had not been informed, and he had only mentioned it to the Examining Magistrate in passing. He was not acting on his instructions, nor on those of the Attorney General.... Then came the voice of Justin Aillevard, the procurator, who sat on the Public Prosecutor's bench. [1959-ASS]

M had Janvier phone for the Public Prosecutor from the lodge. [1960-VIE]

Aristide Fumel said he'd already notified the Public Prosecutor's. [1961-PAR]

As they reached the Quai des Célestins, Parrain, the Deputy Public Prosecutor, and Dantziger, the Examining Magistrate, arrived from the Palais de Justice at the same time by car. [1962-CLO]

The best thing about these cases was that the Public Prosecutor and the Examining Magistrate's didn't care much. "One less to be given board and lodging for years in prison..." [1962-COL]

Intimidated, Dr Pardon was talking faster than usual, as if he were being interrogated by a Public Prosecutor.... Noiret looked for the magistrate so that they could leave together, because the Public Prosecutor appeared only as a formality. [1966-NAH]

M told Janvier to call the Divisional Superintendent, and have him bring a pathologist. Then the Public Prosecutor's. [1968-ENF]

The Public Prosecutor had appointed an Examining Magistrate, Poiret, a young man M had never worked with.... Robert Bureau told M he'd read he sometimes went against the Public Prosecutor's Office. [1969-TUE]

M could imagine the Public Prosecutor, addressing the Court of Assize: With bestial ferocity, Théo Stiernet struck down his grandmother.... The Public Prosecutor's office was sending over a Deputy and an Examining Magistrate.... Lucas had already sent in his report to the Public Prosecutor's Office. [1969-VIN]

Public Prosecutor. Rateau, the Examining Magistrate, the Public Prosecutor, Dr. Paul, police medical expert, all gathered at Forensic Laboratory. [1952-REV]

M called the Public Prosecutor's office from the dingy bar, spoke with a Deputy. Requested to have Dr Paul examine the arm as soon as possible. [1955-COR]

M called the Public Prosecutor to inform him that Xavier Marton was dead.... The Public Prosecutor's office was in the Palais de Justice too, in the same buildings, but a different world, where the walls were covered with carved paneling... M went through the glass doors separating the two worlds. [1957-SCR]

Daumas was appointed as the Examining Magistrate for the Antoinette Vague case by the Public Prosecutor's Office.... De Claes, the Deputy Public Prosecutor came to the crime scene. [1968-HES]

Public Prosecutor's Office. It was nearly 11:00 when M climbed out of his car on Rue Lopert, 200 or 300 meters from the parish church of Auteuil. The men from the Public Prosecutor's Office were already there; Criminal Identification Division arrived five minutes later.... M had seen the house, but the men from the Public Prosecutor's office had been there, and Dr. Paul, and the local Inspector, and 7 or 8 experts from Criminal Records. [1959-CON]

Public Roads. The duties of the Public Roads Squad, were to keep walking along the sidewalks, from morning till night, night till morning.... M remembered in his early days, when he was working in the Public Roads department. He'd been on the point of arresting a pickpocket outside a métro station, when the fellow began yelling "Stop, thief" or something. The crowd fell on M, despite his explanations, giving the man time to escape.... When a certain specialist has left his hotel on the Boulevard Haussmann for a more modest one in the République district, we can expect a jewel robbery shortly. The Public Roads squad has been warned to keep an eye on the jewelers. [1950-MEM]

Puerto Rico Club. Tony Lacour, the accordionist, said he'd recently finished up a job at the Puerto Rico Club. [1949-CHE]

Puget. Vicente Alvaredo said he worked as an apprentice for Maître Puget, in the Boulevard Raspail, a professor of International Law. [1966-NAH]

Puits-en-Soc, Rue. (Liège.)

Jean Chabot and René Delfosse parted at the Rue Puits-en-Soc, on being released from the Sûreté . [1931-GAI]

Pullman. The Commodore sought out his dupes in Pullman cars between Amsterdam and Paris. [1937-38-not]

Pullman. M joined the English detective in the Pullman corridor. [1949-AMI]

Punta Arenas. [(or: Magallanes) seaport city, capital of Magallanes prov., S Chile, on Brunswick Penin; pop. 1966: 67,514.]

Among Yves Joris' letters were a receipt for a subscription service from the Merchant Service League, a picture postcard from Punta Arenas. [1932-POR]

Purgatory. M had ceased to realize, after so many years, that when he arrived at the top of the steep, dusty staircase at Police Headquarters, always slightly out of breath, he would make a brief pause and glance automatically at the glass cage which served as a waiting room, konwn to some of his colleagues as "the aquarium", to others as "Purgatory".... [1953-ECO]

Puteaux. [industrial commune, N France, Hauts-de-Seine dept. pop. 1962: 39,640. NW suburb of Paris, on Seine River.]

Eugénie, the charmwoman at the Guillaume Serres'. Came in daily from 9 to 5. Lived in Puteaux, on the other side of the Seine, above a hardware store, directly opposite the bridge. [1951-GRA]

Alain Lagrange got a taxi coming from Puteaux at Jeanne Debul's house. [1952-REV]

A call came in from the Puteaux Police Station. Roger Gaillardin was dead, had apparently shot himself on the bank of the Seine. [1956-ECH]

The other man, Loubières, burly, hirsute, born at Fécamp, kept a garage at Puteaux. [1961-PAR]

Julien Mila, the bartender at the Pink Rabbit, had served two years of a four-year sentence for an armed robbery at a factory entrance in Puteaux.... One of Antoine Batille's tapes was the sounds of a café in Puteaux. [1969-TUE]

Maurice Marcia had come to M's office about his bartender, Freddy Strazzia, from Piedmont, who'd possibly taken part in a holdup at a branch of a big bank, in Puteaux. [1971-IND]

A police office in Puteaux reported a black Citroën found abandoned with bloodstains on the front passenger seat. [1972-CHA]

PA  PE  PH  PI  PJ  PL  PM  PN  PO  PR  PS  PT  PU  PY  

PY

PYK  PYR  

Pyke. Hadn't M acted the same way when Inspector Pyke of Scotland Yard had come to visit France two years earlier? Had he often left Pyke at some terrace café, just like a checked umbrella? [see AMI] [1949-CHE]

By chance the few friends he usually met at the International Police Congress, like Mr. Pyke, were not there this year. [1953-PEU]

Superintendent Pike [Pyke], of the Yard [Scotland Yard], whom M knew quite well, phoned from London every morning. [1956-ECH]

At least once in his career M had been forced to work in front of a witness who followed his every move. A certain Inspector Pyke, from Scotland Yard, had obtained permission to follow one of M's cases, and seldom in his life had M felt so awkward. [1958-TEM]

Pyke called M to say the marriage between Marcelle Maillant and Herbert Muir had lasted two years. She'd been caught with Stanley Hobson in Manchester, and Muir had gotten a divorce. Pyke was checking further with some of his men in Soho. Said Hobson was known as "Bald Stan". [1963-FAN]

Pyke, Inspector. Present during the interrogation of Caracci, on his third day visiting from Scotland Yard to observe M's methods. He accompanied M to Porquerolles for the investigation of Marcellin's murder. 35-40 years old, non-smoker, Protestant. He bought himself a pair of blue canvas espadrilles as almost everyone wore. Was troubled to find the "birds" at lunch were robins. He told M of his relation with a jewel thief -- they even drank whisky and played chess together. Pyke mentioned a case where a colleague spent 11 weeks at an inn, fishing and drinking. [1949-AMI]

When M landed in England, at Croydon, he was met by Inspector Pyke. It had been years since they had seen each other, and 12 or 13 years since M had set foot in England. Pyke spoke French... but he spoke it with difficulty and hated making mistakes. Drove from the airport in a Scotland Yard Bentley, with a uniformed driver. Pyke assigned Bryan and Fenton to help M track Alain Lagrange. When M called Pyke to say he was leaving England, Pyke said he'd pick them up to drive them to the 6:30 plane. In the car, with Alain, Pyke made a sign that he understood and didn't ask any questions. [1952-REV]

Pyramides, Rue des. [Paris. 1er, Louvre. from Place des Pyramides to Avenue de l'Opéra]

Joseph Mascouvin played bridge every evening at a club on Rue des Pyramides, run by the Countess. [1941-SIG]

Gisèle Marton and Xavier Marton usually left for work together from the Avenue de Châtillon, and took the same bus as far as Rue des Pyramides. [1957-SCR]

Pyrenees. The concierge at Marcel Moncin's usually drank a liqueur from the Pyrenees at night. [1955-TEN]

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